Frequently Asked Questions

Former Waratah Gasworks

What is the historical Waratah gasworks site and where is it located?

Site contamination exists in most urbanised areas in the world. Newcastle is no exception, particularly suburbs on or near former industrial land. Like other industrialised cities, Newcastle has contaminated sites that are the direct result of historical practices such as gasworks. Over 60 former gasworks sites have been identified in NSW, including five sites in Newcastle.

In July 2016, City Of Newcastle (Council) received advice from the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) that a former gasworks may have operated on land bounded by Ellis, Turton and Georgetown roads at Waratah.

Council records did not contain evidence of any former gasworks at this location, but a review of historical sources confirmed that a gasworks operated at this site in Waratah from 1889 to 1926.

After a review of historical sources indicated that a gasworks may have operated at the site, Council engaged an independent environmental consultant to undertake preliminary and then a detailed environmental investigation. This investigation work occurred from late-2016 until late-2017. Findings from the environmental investigation and updates about management activities at the site are available on Council’s website.

What is Council doing about it?

Council engaged an independent environmental consultant to undertake an environmental investigation at the historical gasworks site. This Stage 2B Detailed Site Investigation was completed in November 2017. The Stage 2B Detailed Site Investigation report is currently being finalised and is expected to be issued in early 2018.

A key recommendation of the investigation was to undertake a Remediation Options Assessment for properties with elevated results. The investigation identified the need for further action at 13 properties with elevated results within the Investigation Area, to minimise residents’ potential exposure to gasworks-related substances. Council has now engaged an environmental consultant to conduct a Remediation Options Assessment (ROA) for these properties.

The purpose of the ROA is to identify practical remediation options to minimise potential exposure to gasworks-related  substances, for ongoing residential land use at these properties. Some remedial strategies may include physical measures, such as excavating and replacing accessible soil in garden areas and replanting.

Council is liaising directly with affected residents about possible options for remediation and management measures.

Remediation

What is remediation?

Remediation is the action, or combination of actions taken to minimise the potential risks associated with contamination.

Remediation can range from administrative procedures (such as wearing gloves while gardening), to engineering controls (such as fencing and signage) through to elimination (such as active removal or treatment of contamination).

Physically removing contaminants through excavation may not be necessary at all sites. It may be possible to remediate a site by isolating contaminants through installing barriers, treating contaminants on-site, or introducing management measures to prevent people from coming into contact with the contaminants.

What is a Remediation Options Assessment (ROA)?

Council has engaged an environmental consultant to conduct a Remediation Options Assessment (ROA) for 13 properties impacted by gasworks substances within the eastern portion of the former Waratah Gasworks.

The purpose of the ROA is to identify practical remediation options that minimise potential exposure to gasworks-related substances for residents living at the 13 properties.

The ROA is not intended to determine the preferred remediation option for any particular property; but to present the feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of various remediation options, as a basis for discussion with the property owners.

Council is liaising directly with affected residents about possible options for remediation and management measures.

Who is Council consulting with about remediation?

The investigation identified the need for further action at 13 properties within the former Waratah Gasworks, to minimise residents’ potential exposure to gasworks-related substances through remediation. Council held information sessions on 20 and 21 November 2017 for the 13 affected properties. Council also met with each property owner one-on-one to answer questions about remediation, and seek information about their specific circumstances and remediation preferences.

What will be included in the ROA?

The ROA will provide a clearer understanding of what remediation and management strategies may be practicable and achievable on the properties. The ROA will present the range of remediation approaches that are technically viable for the former Waratah Gasworks and examine the associated logistics, costs, timing and social constraints (as identified through discussions with the owners) associated with each approach. Individual property-owner preferences will also be presented. The ROA will include a preliminary cost analysis for various remediation options.

The ROA will not make recommendations for remediation, but will provide a detailed overview of all practicable remediation approaches, for Council’s consideration and discussion with the property owners. 

What will happen after the ROA is complete?

Findings from the ROA will inform the development of a Remediation Action Plan (RAP), which will outline the specific remediation and management options to be implemented at each property. Developing a long-term site management plan (SMP) may be required for some properties, where some form of post-remediation monitoring or management is required.

Further detail, including timeframes, scope of remediation works and source of funding will depend on the outcome of several possible scenarios:

  1. The New South Wales Environment Protection Authority (EPA) may declare and regulate the former Waratah Gasworks. The EPA can direct the polluter, the local authority or the landowner to remediate the site.
  2. Council may determine to fully or partially fund the remediation of the former Waratah Gasworks. Further engagement with property owners will occur to determine the specific remediation and management options to be implemented at each property. Findings from the ROA will inform the development of a Remediation Action Plan (RAP) for each property.
  3. Council may determine not to fund remediation of the former Waratah Gasworks. Further engagement with property owners will occur.

When will the ROA be complete?

It is expected that the ROA will be completed in mid-2018. As part of the process of completing the ROA, significant consultation on the approaches needs to occur. Time needs to be allowed to undertake this consultation and to incorporate feedback received into the final ROA.

Who will pay for the remediation of the properties?

In completing the ROA, Council is working to determine practicable remediation and long-term management options in conjunction with the affected property owners. Once the ROA is complete, Council will make a determination about remediation funding.

How will Council remediate the Council owned land (including roads, footpaths and verges)?

The ROA will also present remediation approaches for Council owned land, in particular the portions of Ellis Road and Turton Road within the footprint of the former Waratah Gasworks. As part of the Stage 2B Detailed Site Investigation, background sampling was taken within a 500 metre radius of the former gasworks. Specific consideration will be given to the potential exposure scenarios which exist in this wider area to determine the appropriate remediation approach.

Is clean-up\remediation of the site necessary and is it possible?

The Detailed Site Investigation identified the need for further action at 13 properties in the eastern portion of the former Waratah Gasworks, to minimise residents’ potential exposure to gasworks-related substances. The ROA commenced in late-2017 and is the next step to determine what strategies may be appropriate for each property.

There are a number of examples from across Australia where former gasworks sites have been successfully remediated for a range of uses, including recreational and residential. 

Could the gasworks contamination go away without remediation?

Over time, given suitable conditions, there is potential for natural degradation processes to reduce concentrations of some of the substances, for example; phenolic compounds, volatile monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
 
Degradation rates for some ‘heavier’ organic compounds can be slow in many soil and groundwater environments and, as a consequence, these substances may persist for many years. Heavy metals and complex cyanides do not break down and will remain in the soil, although there is the potential for these to reduce in concentration due to leaching over time.
 

Environmental investigation

Why was the site investigated?

Former gasworks sites may be contaminated by residual waste materials buried at sites during operation or decommissioning. There are a range of potential residual contaminants associated with gasworks sites. A detailed environmental investigation was undertaken to help determine the extent and nature of residual gasworks contamination detected in soil and groundwater at the site during the initial investigation in September 2016. 

What area was investigated?

The investigation area comprised 20 residential properties located within the footprint of the former gasworks and two off-site properties occupied by the Family Support Centre and Callaghan College – Waratah Technology Campus. Non-sensitive public locations within a 500 metre radius of the former gasworks site were also investigated.

The following map outlines the investigation area.
mapgas3.jpg

What investigations occurred?

The initial investigations (Stages 1 and 2A) occurred between July and November 2016 and involved:
  • Reviewing information about the history of the site
  • Reviewing the condition of the site through a visual site inspection within accessible areas
  • Undertaking initial sampling of the site – more than 200 soil samples were collected and analysed
  • Identifying potential gasworks contaminant locations and types
  • Identifying a need for further detailed site investigation and analysis.
The initial shallow soil samples were assessed by an independent laboratory and the results have been reviewed by Council, NSW EPA, Hunter New England Local Health District, the site auditor and other relevant government agencies. The results were provided to Council in an Environmental Investigation Report and to property owners/occupiers.
 
Stage 2B of the investigation occurred from December 2016 to November 2017 and involved:
  • Collecting more than 300 soil, vapour and groundwater samples from private and public land
  • Installing groundwater soil vapour monitoring wells on selected properties
  • Investigating locations within a 500 metre radius of the site
  • Recommending further action at properties in the Eastern portion of the site, to reduce residents’ potential exposure to substances associated with historical gasworks.
All detailed environmental investigations have been undertaken in accordance with the Australian National Environment Protection Measure Framework.  View the fact sheet from NSW EPA

What were the findings from the investigation?

The environmental investigation identified contaminants considered to be related to former gasworks activities within the eastern portion of the former gasworks site, at concentrations above typical background concentrations. This is consistent with the area where former gasworks infrastructure is understood to have been located.

Contaminants in shallow soils were significantly lower in the western portion of the site, outside the footprint of the former gasworks infrastructure, and within typical background concentrations. Similar results were also detected at the Family Support Centre and Waratah College. At these locations, gasworks indicator substances were absent or at much lower concentrations.

The western portion of the former gasworks site, Family Support Centre and Waratah College, are not considered to be impacted by substances from the former Waratah Gasworks. These areas recorded concentrations of substances considered to be typical of background conditions within the local Waratah area, and not related to former gasworks activity.

See more information about the investigation

The following map outlines the eastern and western portion of the investigation area.

Were gasworks-related substances identified outside of the former gasworks site?

Results from samples collected outside of the former gasworks site and investigation area indicate that some contaminants were present at elevated concentrations; however, gasworks indicator substances were typically absent in these off-site samples. As such, these concentrations are considered typical of background levels within the local Waratah area.

This is understood to reflect the long term impacts of a range of industrial activities in the neighbourhood, including brickworks, collieries, foundries, smelters, steelworks and incinerators, as well as vehicular traffic.

I live near the former gasworks site, will my property be tested?

As part of the environmental investigation, samples were collected from public spaces up to 500 metres from the gasworks site, to characterise typical background substances that may be present from man-made sources other than the former gasworks. As the environmental investigation is now complete, further sampling from outside the former gasworks site is not required at this stage.

Did the investigation find contamination that is not associated with the gasworks?

In Australia, many urban areas have a strong industrial heritage and urban soils are often found to contain concentrations of chemical substances above screening criteria, due to a variety of man-made sources. The investigation results show this to be the case for the local Waratah area.

This is understood to reflect the long term impacts of a range of industrial activities in the neighbourhood, including brickworks, collieries, foundries, smelters, steelworks and incinerators, as well as vehicular traffic.

The Detailed Site Investigation found that areas outside of the eastern portion of the site are not considered to be impacted by gasworks-related substances. These areas recorded concentrations of substances considered to be typical of background conditions within the local Waratah area, and not related to former gasworks activity.
 

Health

Is there any health risk associated with the site?

Council has liaised with Hunter New England Local Health District and the NSW EPA to seek advice throughout the investigation to ensure any health and environmental concerns are addressed.
 
Management measures to mitigate short-term exposure risks were recommended by Council and Hunter New England Local Health District in November 2016. As the Detailed Site Investigation found that results from the eastern portion of the former gasworks have shown concentrations of gasworks-related substances above screening criteria and background concentrations, the precautionary advice provided by Council and NSW Health remains in-place for residents in this area until further action has been carried out:
 
  • Not eating any vegetables grown at the property or eggs laid by hens on the property.
  • Avoid having areas of bare soil by maintaining grass cover or otherwise covering bare areas.
  • Minimise exposure to soil during gardening activities by minimising dust generation, wearing gloves and washing hands after handling soil.
  • If children are playing in sand pits or soil, it is advised that this occur in a raised bed or structure above the natural ground level. The raised bed or structure should contain sand or soil that has not been sourced from onsite so as to avoid any potential contamination.
Now that the Investigation is complete, residents outside the eastern portion properties may choose to no longer follow these precautions. However, residents within the eastern portion should continue to observe this precautionary advice to mitigate potential exposure to gasworks-related substances until further remediation action has occurred.

In Australia, many urban areas have a strong industrial heritage and urban soils are often found to contain concentrations of chemical substances above screening criteria, due to a variety of man-made sources. The investigation results show this to be the case for the local Waratah area. Although this does not necessarily mean that such substances present a risk to health, residents outside the eastern portion may choose to continue applying some of the precautionary advice and thus to further limit any risk of exposure to contaminants in the environment.

Could there be potential health effects for residents, due to past exposure, and what are they?

Council is not an authority on health and recommends that residents direct all health-related questions to Hunter New England Public Health or their local GP.

For an environmental contaminant to pose a health risk to people, there needs to be a mechanism for it to enter a person’s body, e.g. through breathing chemical vapour, skin contact or ingestion (eating); in a sufficient amount to cause health effects. The mechanisms by which a contaminant can enter a person’s body are known as 'exposure pathways'.
 
Although the Stage 2B Detailed Site Investigation found elevated concentrations of some substances likely to be related to the former gasworks in shallow soil within the eastern portion of the former gasworks site, there were limited exposure pathways of these chemicals for residents.

The Investigation confirmed that the main pathway for potential exposure to gasworks substances is through direct contact with shallow soil. Due to most affected properties having significant coverage from dwellings, driveways, paved areas and lawn, the potential for exposure is limited, but possible. If direct exposure were to occur frequently, over many years, there may be the potential for adverse health effects to occur.

Health effects from exposure to contaminants found on an old gasworks site can range from minor skin irritations due to high or low pH of the chemical through to more serious health conditions. Some groups of people, such as young children, may be more vulnerable to exposure due to behaviours such as playing in or eating dirt.

To mitigate potential exposure risk, it is recommended that residents continue following the precautionary advice to minimise exposure to shallow soil and the consumption of home grown vegetables or eggs from chickens raised on the property. If these precautions are followed, all properties within the affected area remain safe for people to continue living in.

Council recommends that residents direct all health-related questions to Hunter New England Population Health or their local GP for more tailored health advice.

If my property’s soil sampling results exceed the screening criteria for some substances, am I likely to experience health effects?

Screening criteria are used to provide an initial understanding of whether further investigation and assessment is required. Where a substance is present at a concentration above the criteria, this indicates that further investigation and assessment is appropriate, but does not necessarily mean that the substance presents a risk to health.

The screening criteria adopt a conservative or precautionary approach. For example, they are based on assessments of risk that assume direct, long-term exposure to the soils. Often further assessment at particular sites will show that the risk is less than assumed in the models – for example direct or long-term exposure is often not likely.

The preliminary health screening criteria used during the investigation have been sourced from Australian and international guidance that has been agreed in consultation with the Site Auditor.

Is there a risk for residents who garden, or have children playing in the backyard?

The Stage 2B Detailed Site Investigation, completed in November 2017, identified the need for further action at properties in the eastern portion of the Investigation Area, to minimise residents’ potential exposure to gasworks-related substances.

As the Detailed Site Investigation found that results from the eastern portion of the site have shown concentrations of gasworks-related substances above screening criteria and background concentrations, the precautionary advice provided by Council and NSW Health remains in-place for residents in this area until further action has been carried out:
 
  • Not eating any vegetables grown at the property or eggs laid by hens on the property
  • Avoid having areas of bare soil by maintaining grass cover or otherwise covering bare areas
  • Minimise exposure to soil during gardening activities by minimising dust generation, wearing gloves and washing hands after handling soil
  • If children are playing in sand pits or soil, it is advised that this occur in a raised bed or structure above the natural ground level. The raised bed or structure should contain sand or soil that has not been sourced from onsite so as to avoid any potential contamination.
Now that the Investigation is complete, this precautionary advice does not need to remain in place to mitigate potential exposure to gasworks-related substances outside the eastern portion properties.

In Australia, many urban areas have a strong industrial heritage and urban soils are often found to contain concentrations of chemical substances above screening criteria, due to a variety of man-made sources. The investigation results show this to be the case for the local Waratah area. Although this does not necessarily mean that such substances present a risk to health, residents may consider it good practice to continue applying some of the precautionary advice.

General precautions for residents living in areas with urban contamination are available on the Council website here.

Can/will the fruit on our trees and vegetables growing in our gardens be tested?

Some fruit was tested during the Stage 2B investigation. Results indicate that the fruit is unlikely to be impacted by gasworks-related substances and suitable for consumption. Vegetables were not tested during Stage 2B, and the precautionary recommendation not to consume home-grown vegetables remains in place for properties in the eastern portion of the former gasworks site.

General precautions for residents living in areas with urban contamination are available on the Council website here.

Will people be tested as part of the investigation?

At this stage, there are no plans to conduct any blood testing or other type of human sample analysis.

Property development and valuation

Will this affect property prices in the area? Will property owners be compensated for any loss of property value?

As an historically industrial city, there are thousands of properties across Newcastle which have been investigated for a range of potentially contaminating land uses. Following investigation and/or remediation (to confirm their suitability for use), these properties continue to be sold without ongoing concerns being raised with Council regarding loss of value. 

Contamination of land is a matter that is relevant to the assessment of land value. The Investigation has identified 13 properties in the eastern portion of the Investigation Area that need remediation. Remediation Options for these properties are being considered, but no remediation has yet been undertaken. Until appropriate remediation is undertaken, there is a potential impact on the value of these properties, however any actual loss of value is not realised until the properties are sold. In this regards, without actual substantiated losses being realised, the questions related to compensation cannot be determined.

Any purchaser of these properties will be notified on the section 149 Certificate of the completed investigation reports undertaken to date. 

What is a section 149 certificate and how does it affect me and my property?

A section 149 certificate is a planning certificate issued by Council. It sets out a range of information, some mandatory information and some non-mandatory information held by Council in relation to the land. Information is placed on a certificate which relates to its contaminated land status. 

What information should be contained in the s149 certificates?

The section 149 certificate includes the information that is contained in schedule 4 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 which is relevant to the land the subject of the certificate. This includes, among others, relevant planning instruments and development controls, approvals and policies.

For the purposes of section 149 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, the following matters are prescribed in addition to any other matters, prescribed by the regulations under that section, to be specified in a certificate under that section:
 
  • That the land to which the certificate relates is significantly contaminated land—if the land (or part of the land) is significantly contaminated land at the date when the certificate is issued
  • That the land to which the certificate relates is subject to a management order—if it is subject to such an order at the date when the certificate is issued
  • That the land to which the certificate relates is the subject of an approved voluntary management proposal—if it is the subject of such an approved proposal at the date when the certificate is issued
  • That the land to which the certificate relates is subject to an ongoing maintenance order—if it is subject to such an order at the date when the certificate is issued
  • That the land to which the certificate relates is the subject of a site audit statement—if a copy of such a statement has been provided at any time to the local authority issuing the certificate.
The section 149 Certificate will be updated as more information becomes available, for example, when an investigation report has been completed in respect of any potential contaminants on the land, Council will refer to this report in the certificate.  

What will happen if we lodged a Development Application for the affected land (on the former gasworks site) to either renovate\extend or redevelop? 

Council will need to consider the issue of potential contamination associated with the former gasworks in relation to any DA lodged with Council. Council's approach to contaminated land is set out in the  Newcastle DCP Section 5.02
 
Depending on the nature of the application, Council may require further information in relation to potential contamination on the land prior to a determination of the application being made. 

What about developments in High Street, adjacent to the former gasworks site?

The Detailed Site Investigation involved collecting samples from beyond the investigation area up to 500 metres from the gasworks site, to characterise typical background substances that may be present from man-made sources other than the former gasworks.

Results from these off-site samples indicated that although some contaminants were present at elevated concentrations, gasworks indicator substances were typically absent. As such, these concentrations are considered typical of background levels within the local Waratah area, and not related to former gasworks activity.

Should we get a valuation of our home?

Property owners should obtain their own independent advice. 

Should I talk to my bank about this? 

Property owners should obtain their own independent advice.

Can Council provide legal advice?

Property owners and residents should seek their own independent legal advice. You may wish to contact the Law Society which can provide a list of local lawyers with relevant experience. 

Solicitor Referral Service Law Society of NSW
170 Phillip Street
Sydney NSW 2000
DX 362 Sydney
T: (02) 9926 0300, or
1800 422 713 (outside Sydney)
E:  crs@lawsociety.com.au
 

Background

Why didn't the Council know about this sooner?

The former gasworks was constructed in 1889 by Waratah Municipal Council and was decommissioned around 1928, before the formation of the City Of Newcastle (Council). Waratah Municipal Council merged with the Council of Greater Newcastle in 1938. Consistent with the normal practices of local councils in NSW, council documents such as meeting minutes and reports cease being records in use after a period of time (currently 25 years) and are usually destroyed after a period of time in accordance with established protocols. As a result Council’s records of the gasworks are expected to be extremely limited (if any).
 
Similarly, any internal corporate knowledge in relation to the gasworks would have been lost to the organisation in the 90 odd years since the gasworks closed. Indeed, when Council's contaminated land database was being updated with historical information on land uses, no records or corporate knowledge was uncovered to identify this site within the local government area. Council has as part of the current investigations identified some limited archival material held by the Newcastle Regional Library.
 
In addition, the site was not included in the list of the locations of known gasworks sites maintained by EPA. Until this matter was brought to the EPA's attention by a member of the public, the site was not known to either the EPA or Council. The gasworks was brought to Council’s attention in June 2016 via a public enquiry to the NSW EPA in relation to an historic map showing a small gasworks in the area bounded by High, Turton and Georgetown Roads, Waratah. 

If City Of Newcastle and the EPA were not aware of the former gasworks in Waratah, what is the likelihood for other unknown contaminated sites or gasworks to exist in other areas?

Following the discovery of the Waratah gasworks site, Council undertook an additional search of information available on the internet to identify other potential unknown gasworks sites. No additional information has been found to-date to suggest there are additional former gasworks sites in the Newcastle LGA, of which Council and the EPA are not aware of.
 
New information regarding potentially contaminating former land uses and other contaminated land information is being added to Council's register on an ongoing basis. Due to the industrial history of Newcastle, there is always the potential for other unknown contaminated sites to exist. 

What types of wastes and by-products are associated with old gasworks sites and what might impacted areas look like or be characterised by?

Products associated with former gasworks sites have typically included:
  • Tars
  • Oils
  • Hydrocarbon sludges
  • Spent oxides (including complex cyanides)
  • Ash
  • Ammoniacal recovery wastes.
Some of the wastes, such as tars, commonly exist in soils and in groundwater in the form of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), which are a range of substances that can either float on a water body or sink to the base of an aquifer. Many of the wastes and by-products at gasworks were recycled or reused. However, it was common for some to be buried on or near the gasworks site, for instance in underground tar wells, liquor wells, pipes and purifier beds and were not necessarily removed when gasworks were decommissioned.
 
Many of the principal wastes can be identified visually or by the odour they emit. For example:
  • Tar oils are easily identifiable as a black to dark brown, strong phenolic odorous ooze
  • Iron cyanide complexes (formed during the removal of hydrogen cyanide) are recognisable by their distinctive Prussian blue colour (when weathered) or by grey/black/green colours (when not weathered)
  • Iron staining can also be a common characteristic identifying the presence of spent oxides, but can also occur naturally (especially in low lying waterlogged areas). 
Additional information on the types of wastes and by-products associated with former gasworks sites can be found on the  NSW EPA website
 
More information about specific contaminants is available on the  ATSDR website
What types of substances are associated with old gasworks sites?

There are a range of substances associated with former gasworks sites, which may include:
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)
  • Petroleum hydrocarbons including Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Total Xylenes (BTEX)
  • Complex and free cyanides
  • Metals
  • Phenols
  • Ammonia
  • Nitrates
  • Sulfates
  • Sulfides
It is important to note that these substances can also be found in the environment from other natural or man- made sources and are not therefore exclusive to former gasworks.
 
Additional information on the types of chemicals associated with gasworks sites can be found on
the  NSW EPA website 
 
More information about specific contaminants is available on the  ATSDR website.

Community consultation and contact details

Who can I call for more information?

For enquiries about the Environmental Investigation, please contact City Of Newcastle's Regulatory Services on 02 4974 2522, Monday to Friday, between 8.30am and 5pm.
 
For more information about related matters, please see contact details below:
 
  • Specific health advice: Your doctor
  • General health information: Hunter New England Local Health District: 1300 066 055
  • Other contamination information: NSW EPA Environment Line: 13 15 55.

How has Council informed the public?

Council has informed all residents within the immediate and surrounding area by door knocks and letterbox drops, and has provided email information to property owners of tenanted properties. Council has also provided information about the investigation to three local schools and the Family Support Centre in the surrounding area.

Community members attended information sessions held by Council at the Ethnic Communities Council Hall in Waratah on Monday 15 August 2016 and Thursday 18 August 2016. Affected residents were provided with broad options identified from the Remediation Options Assessment at information sessions held by Council at the Ethnic Communities Council Hall in Waratah on Monday 20 November 2017 and Tuesday 21 November 2017.

Council will use a range of communication channels to keep the community informed of the investigation, including direct engagement, emails, information updates, flyers and further information sessions.

How do I get ongoing information\updates?

Council is committed to keeping the community fully informed about progress at the historical Waratah gasworks site.

The project website will continue to be updated with the latest information, Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), location map and downloadable materials and resources. Go to www.newcastle.nsw.gov.au and search for ‘Waratah Gasworks’.

If you have any questions, please contact Council's Regulatory Services on 4974 2522, or visit www.newcastle.nsw.gov.au. 

Contact

For enquiries about the Environmental Investigation, please contact Newcastle City Council's Regulatory Services on 02 4974 2522, Monday to Friday, between 8.30am and 5pm.

For more information about related matters, please see contact details below:

  • Specific health advice: Your doctor
  • General health information: Hunter New England Local Health District: 1300 066 055

Other contamination information: NSW EPA Environment Line:
13 15 55