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Newcastle Art Gallery Staff

Cultural Director
Liz Burcham

Assistant Director
Lauretta Morton

Administration Officer
Lana Rogers

Curator
Sarah Johnson

Assistant Curator - Collection and Exhibitions
Sally Cunningham

Exhibitions Coordinator
Tobias Spitzer

Technical Officer
Joshua White

Audience Development and Visitor Services Coordinator
Lauren van Katwyk

Audience Programs Officer
Julianne Lawson (Acting)
Jade Hull (on leave)

Front of House Officer
Ruth Bridgeman (Acting)


Any vacancies for jobs at Newcastle Art Gallery are advertised on The City of Newcastle website.




The History of Newcastle Art Gallery

In 1945 Dr Roland Pope, an ophthalmic surgeon from Sydney made the promise of the bequest of his art collection of some 137 Australian paintings to Newcastle, conditional upon the construction of a gallery to house them. A bold promise fuelled by a passionate belief that a steel city could have the best gallery in the country. Pope's collection was held in storage for 12 years awaiting a gallery. In 1957 Newcastle City Art Gallery, as it was then known, opened on the second floor of the War Memorial Cultural Centre adjacent to the gallery's current home.

Newcastle Art Gallery, Australia's first purpose built regional gallery, was officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on Friday 11 March 1977. Applauded as a model for medium sized galleries with its innovative floor plan and hanging system. The building is also an important example of early 1970s architecture with its geometric forms and brutalist aesthetic. Today the Gallery has 6100 works of art in its collection and it is considered as one of the most significant public collections in Australia.

Newcastle is the second oldest and sixth largest city in Australia. First established as a penal settlement, the earliest works in the Gallery's collection are by convict artists. Joseph Lycett's paintings of early Newcastle, or Coal River as it was known in the early nineteenth century, give central prominence to Nobbys headland, the quintessential feature of Newcastle harbour. Today, Newcastle is the busiest harbour on the eastern seaboard. Lycett's early views of Newcastle also document the Indigenous inhabitants of the region, namely the Awabakal and Worimi people whose lands spread north of the Hunter River and south to encompass Lake Macquarie.

Newcastle has a proud working class history and is still the largest coal exporting port in the world. The city has also produced its share of artists. William Dobell, John Olsen, William Rose, Tom Gleghorn, Ross Morrow, John Molvig were all born and bred in the city, while artists including John Passmore, Royston Harpur, Stanislaus Rapotec, Matthew Perceval, Shay Docking, and Margaret Olley have been drawn to the city, to its architecture and industrial vistas.




VISITING
Open 10am – 5pm
Tuesday to Sunday

 

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS
Closed - Monday 6 October 2014
Closed - Thursday 25 December 2014 (Christmas Day)
Closed - Friday 26 December 2014 (Boxing Day)

Admission to the Gallery is free. Some special exhibitions and events may incur a charge.


CONTACT
Gallery contact line - 02 4974 5100
Gallery email - artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au
Gallery Society enquiry line - 02 4974 5123 (answering machine checked daily)
Gallery Society email - gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au


CLOAKROOM
Although the Gallery does not offer a formal cloakroom service, our staff will store personal and bulky items as a courtesy while you are at the Gallery.

Please be aware it is a requirement of the Gallery to leave any bags or items exceeding A3 in size at our front counter. It is at the Gallery’s discretion to request a bag or item be left in the bag check area. This policy is to ensure that you can enjoy your visit and also to ensure the safety of the Gallery’s collection and the exhibitions on display.


HOW TO FIND US
Newcastle Art Gallery
1 Laman Street Newcastle
Across from Civic Park and adjacent to Newcastle Region Library, the Art Gallery is situated on the corner of Laman and Darby Streets.


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ACCESS INFORMATION
The Gallery is situated within easy access of Civic Park and the Darby Street cafe and shopping precinct. After an extended period of redevelopment, Laman Street has been reopened to the public. This fantastic new shared space is pedestrian and cycle friendly and accessible to all. 


TRANSPORT
By Train
Civic Station operates on the Hunter Line. The station is approximately a 500 metre walk from the Gallery via Wheeler Place and Civic Park

By Bus Stops for various routes operate on Hunter Street, King Street and Darby Street. For more information call 131 500 or visit 131500.com.au


PARKING
Limited on-street parking with time limits and paid ticketing systems operate in the Civic Park and Cooks Hill area. For information, contact the Gallery before your visit.


PLAN YOUR VISIT
Large groups are encouraged to call and inform us of their visit. Newcastle Art Gallery Guides provide free tours to interested groups booking at least a week in advance.

Courtesy wheelchair is available on request.

For more information, visit our exhibitions page, our what’s on page, or call the gallery on 4974 5100 for more information.


VENUE HIRE
Private events at the Art Gallery
Our distinctive venue can be tailored to suit your requirements from smaller cocktail functions to larger, formal events – all in amongst some of the Australia’s most revered works of art from the Gallery’s collection. You can also choose to enhance your guests’ experience with a tour conducted by one of our Gallery guides. We can work closely with you to tailor and individualise your event vision. We have established relationships with local caterers and suppliers to ensure smooth delivery of your special event.
For more information contact 4974 5100 or artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au




Newcastle Art Gallery Collection

Newcastle Art Gallery's collection is one of the finest in regional Australia with its quality and breadth is recognised as a significant cultural asset. The collection includes over 5,000 works of art, and presents a comprehensive overview of Australian art from colonial times to the present day. In addition, the Gallery has a significant collection of Indigenous bark paintings and one of the nation's finest collections of twentieth century Australian and Japanese ceramics. In recent years, the gallery has also developed a bold collection of contemporary Australian art.

In the early years the Gallery’s first director Gil Docking procured the donation of key works including William Dobell’s Portrait of a strapper 1941, described by the artist as one of his finest portraits. Former director David Thomas’s scholarship on Rupert Bunny resulted in exceptional purchases and donations. Thomas also procured the works of early Modernists including Grace Cossington Smith, Margaret Preston, Roland Wakelin and Jack Noel Kilgour among others.

The presence of industry and the mandate to meet the cultural needs of a working class city resulted in substantial donations including the Nagano Japanese ceramics collection, which derives its name from Shigeo Nagano, the former chairman of Nippon Steel. This collection paved the way for subsequent gifts of Japanese ceramics including the landmark gift of the avant-garde Sodeisha collection. The Gallery Society’s presentation of Gwyn Hanssen Pigott’s major installation At the gates continues the focus on sculptural ceramics.

The establishment of von Bertouch Galleries, the City’s first commercial gallery, in 1963 greatly enhanced the cultural life of Newcastle. Anne von Bertouch introduced many significant artists and their work to Novocastrian audiences. Her stable included Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, Lloyd Rees, Judy Cassab, Margaret Olley, Donald Friend and John Coburn. Her quest to make Newcastle the “art capital of Australia" was furthered in 2003 when she bequeathed her own private collection to the city.

Arguably the Gallery’s most loved painting is Summer at Carcoar by Brett Whiteley. Commissioned by Newcastle resident and collector Dr William Bowmore, this massive painting condenses all of Whiteley’s stylistic trademarks and influences. In 1978 Whiteley won the Wynne Prize with Summer at Carcoar, along with the prestigious Archibald and Sulman prizes in the same year. Bowmore has also been responsible for the donation of much of the international collection including important bronze sculptures by Jules Dalou, Jacob Epstein, Henri Gaudier-Brzeska and Auguste Rodin.

Acquisitions of contemporary art attest to the gallery’s charter to reflect the finest examples of Australian art making practice. An unlikely mascot for contemporary art is Patricia Piccinini’s Surrogate (for the northern hairy nosed wombat). A recent acquisition, this beguiling sculptural installation invites audiences to consider the implications of biological and scientific tampering and reminds us that contemporary art is a state of encounter.

Following the success of the exhibition of the Laverty collection of Indigenous art, recent acquisitions have included paintings by Bidyadanga artists Jan Billycan and Daniel Walbidi, as well as Arnhem Land artist Galumbu Yunupingu.

Collection viewing
Works in the Collection that are not on display can be made available for viewing. A minimum of four weeks prior notice to the Gallery is required.  In the case of special circumstances, timeframes can be reviewed by the curatorial team. 

Image reproduction and copyright enquiries
Unauthorised reproduction of images is not permitted. For all enquiries relating to reproduction rights of the Collection, please contact the curatorial team.

Contact:
Sally Cunningham, Assistant Curator, Collections and Exhibitions
p: 02 4974 5120
e: swcunningham@ncc.nsw.gov.au







Gordon Darling Foundation Newcastle City Council







Australian Painting

 

The Newcastle Art Gallery contains one of the few collections in regional Australia where it is possible to chart the complex history of art in Australia with works of stellar quality. Paintings dominate the key holdings since, from the time Europeans arrived in Australia, painting has been the ascendant form of expression in the visual arts. Before this, Indigenous Australians painted on bark and stone but the new arrivals did not take particular interest, since their vision of art was attuned to Europe.

Read More
 




 








JOIN US ON SOCIAL MEDIA

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On Insta yourself? Show us something - tag @newcastle_art_gallery - we would love to see what others are doing around Newcastle and Australia.

SKYWHALE IS COMING

Patricia Piccinini's Skywhale is coming to Newcastle. Intrigued?

The big event is coming up on Friday 28 November 2014. Join us on Facebook to stay updated on all the action.

KILGOUR PRIZE 2014

The list of Finalists for this year's Kilgour Prize has been announced. Click here to see who has the chance of winning $50 000. Exhibition opens 8 November.




BADEN PAILTHORPE:
Spatial Operations

7 February – 26 April 2015

Spatial Operations addresses the power of artefacts and ANZAC mythology. Made from 212 individual sculptures, each piece is a cast pulped paper replica of the SAS helmet used by Victoria Cross recipient Ben Roberts-Smith from the Afghanistan campaign and displayed as a dramatic grid installation in the Gallery space.

Baden Pailthorpe was the Artist in Residence at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra in 2013 and Spatial Operations is the result of this residency. Instead of being sent to interpret a war zone, Pailthorpe was ‘embedded’ within the institution itself, turning his attention to the artefacts and practices that make up its collection. This inaugural display of the work at the Newcastle Art Gallery will coincide with the 100th anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli in 2015.










KILGOUR PRIZE 2014

8 November 2014 – 25 January 2015

The annual Kilgour Prize for figurative and portrait painting awards $50,000 for the most outstanding work of art, as judged by a selection panel. A People’s Choice prize of $5,000 is also awarded.

Born in 1900, Jack Noel Kilgour was known for his academic modernism, many of his works were paintings of urban landscapes and portraiture. His contemporaries included Jean Bellette, William Dobell, Paul Haefliger, Eric Wilson and his wife Nancy Kilgour, with whom he established a significant artistic partnership. His work is well represented in the Newcastle Art Gallery collection, as well as in significant state and national collections.

All Kilgour Prize entries are assessed by two independent judges and Sarah Johnson, Curator Newcastle Art Gallery.

The Kilgour Prize is financed by the Jack Noel Kilgour bequest which is administered by The Trust Company, Part of Perpetual.



2014 Judges:

John Cheeseman, Manager Cultural Services/ Gallery Director Mosman Art Gallery

Andrew Frost, Art writer and critic

Sarah Johnson, Curator Newcastle Art Gallery

 

2014 Finalists:

Michael Bell

Alvina Bishop-Edwards

Clare Brodie

Anh Do

Graeme Drendel

John Edwards

Melissa Hartley

Alan Jones

Steve Lopes

Stewart MacFarlane

Rachel Milne

Michael Muir

Tom Phillips

Liam Power

Matthew Quick

Paul Ryan

Robin Stewart

Mark Tweedie

Deborah Wilkinson




ONE FROM NONE
The minimal aesthetic in art

23 August - 16 November 2014

One from none: The minimal aesthetic in art brings together diverse works of art from the Newcastle Art Gallery collection where actual space becomes more powerful than depicted space, and where artists push the boundaries of material usage.

For the first time since its unveiling at Newcastle Art Gallery in 1978, this exhibition includes the steel floor installation by seminal minimalist artist Carl Andre, SumΣ16.




The Hannell Cricket Challenge Cup, a highly important piece of colonial silver was originally donated to the Newcastle Cricket Club by well-known Newcastle identity, Clarence Hannell (1836 - 1909), the son of our first mayor, James Hannell and his wife Mary.

Clarence Hannell was for over forty years Newcastle’s Shipping Master; a philanthropist and a leading figure in theatrical and sporting circles, especially rowing, yachting and horse racing. Hannell was secretary of the Newcastle Cricket Club for many years and could be referred to in today’s terminology, ‘a cricket tragic’.

Other tangible links with him survive. A watercolour of Hannell’s barque Memento painted by leading colonial marine artist Frederick Garling (1806 - 73) is in the Newcastle Maritime Museum collection. His home, Minimbah, corner of Church and Brown streets, Newcastle is classifi ed by the National Trust.

The Cricket Challenge Cup is the work of leading colonial silver and goldsmith and medal designer, Evan Jones (1846 - 1917) of Hunter Street, Sydney. Evans migrated to Australia in 1855. One of his works is in the National Gallery of Australia collection and there are four in the National Gallery of Victoria collection.

The news of this recent purchase was serendipitous for me, having watched the cup being sold to a private collector at a Newcastle auction about a decade ago, when the Newcastle Museum tried unsuccessfully to raise donations from the local business community. It is fitting that the Gallery has acquired its first piece of colonial silver, an area of interest for many leading public galleries.

The cup stands 39cm high, has width of 21cm and weighs 600g. It is surmounted by a gentleman batsman wearing a boater hat. There is no wooden base, often found with such trophies, but design characteristics are of cast and repousse silver decoration which are typical of the period.

It is engraved: The Hannell Challenge Cup Won by The Newcastle Cricket Club, Seasons 1882, 83, 84. And at the bottom: And presented by them to their esteemed vice president Geo. Bewick Sept 12th 1895.

George Bewick (junior) was responsible for bringing a number of English cricket teams to Newcastle. He died in 1916 and presumably the cup passed down through his family.

Keith Parsons
Chair
Hunter Regional Committee
National Trust of Australia

Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 45, Number 1
February - June 2014




Friday, 1 January, 2010







BEARDS, MO'S & BRO'S
A celebration of the hirsute in art

8 November - 25 January 2015

In concert with Kilgour Prize 2014 - an exhibition showcasing figurative and portraiture genres, Beards, Mo's & Bro's brings together works from the Newcastle Art Gallery collection that feature the diversity of beards and moustaches from the 'hipster' beard, to the grand style of the mutton chops.







LIKE US: Patricia Piccinini

29 November 2014 - 22 February 2015

Like Us is an substantial exhibition that highlights the key themes of my practice. The work is often intense, sometimes strange, sometimes beautiful, frequently emotional, accessible yet complex and always looking to create connections with the audience and stimulate thought and discussion.

Like Us invites the viewer to enter a world that is clearly different from the one we live in. It is a world unlike our own but not so far removed from it. It is a world that plays out the implications of the processes and ideas that animate much of contemporary life. It is a reflection of our world, but reshaped by my own personal perceptions. Many of the works reflect on what might come from contemporary research, but it is more ambiguous than didactic. I am inspired by the implications of the science that shows how closely related all earthly life is. I am intrigued by the possibilities and compromises that are tied together when research is put into practice. I am aware of what happens in the space between certainty and reality, where people do the wrong things for all the right reasons. I am not trying to tell people what to think, I am more interested in how they feel, and in offering them a space to reflect for themselves or just to wonder.

Connection and empathy are at the heart of my practice, and at the heart of this exhibition. Many of the works are beings of one sort or another; creatures. The word creature comes from Middle English and means literally ‘something created’. My creatures are just that, imaginary beings that are almost possible. They are not always traditionally beautiful, but they always have a beauty and an honesty within them. They are more vulnerable than threatening. People sometimes find their strangeness off-putting at first, but they usually learn to see past this. The creatures literally appeal to the audience’s empathy, they entreat the viewer to look beyond their strangeness and see the connections. This is the double meaning of the title. ‘Like us’ - the creatures implore; ‘because, deep down, you are just like us.’

This process of connection is led to a certain degree by the other inhabitants of the exhibition, which tend to be children. Many of my works contain different representations of children and infants, who for me embody a number of the key issues. Obviously children directly express the idea of genetics – both natural and artificial – but beyond that they also imply the responsibilities that a creator has to their creations. The innocence and vulnerability of children is powerfully emotive and evokes empathy – their presence softens the hardness of some of the more difficult ideas. The children in my works are young enough to accept the strangeness and difference of my world without difficulty, and they hint at the speed at which the extraordinary becomes commonplace in contemporary society. For me, the clear emotional bonds that connect the children and the creatures in my work are simultaneously optimistic and disturbing. Their closeness is both moving and unsettling.

Like Us is comprised of sculptures, paintings, drawings and video works that approach these issues, and others, from numerous different angles. There are important early works as well as some of my most recent, alongside significant pieces from the last fifteen years. The space has been broken into a series of connected, yet discrete spaces, some large and some more intimate. There is flow from dark to light and the works arranged in a way that emphasises the more unexpected connections between them rather than the obvious. The gallery becomes an immersive world that the viewer enters and moves through, discovering unexpected places and occupants at every turn.

 

Exhibition text by Patricia Piccinini

Friday, 1 January, 2010







Australian Drawing

 

The collection includes some notable nineteenth-century drawings, such as Adelaide Ironside’s Self portrait 1855, but the bulk of quality holdings of works on paper are from the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on drawings produced in the period since the establishment of the Gallery in 1957. From 1900 onwards, the collection is of such depth that in 1984 and 2005 the Gallery was able to mount survey exhibitions of drawing in Australia with major representation by most significant twentieth-century Australian artists along with prime examples by many contemporary practitioners.

Read more




Australian Prints

 

Richard Browne’s Newcastle, in New South Wales with a distant view of Point Stephen 1812 and another of his engravings, View of the Hunters River, near Newcastle, from the same date, are the earliest prints in the collection. There are almost fifty prints from the colonial era in the works on paper holdings and many of these, like Browne’s engravings, relate to the early history of the Hunter region. Prints by Walter Preston and Joseph Lycett are strongly represented along with works by J. H. Clark and John Skinner Prout. The collection also contains many of the other images by S. T. Gill and Eugène von Guérard that circulated throughout Australia and Britain, representing picturesque views of colonial landscapes and life on the gold fields. Such prints are important historical documents but because of the great rarity of material for this period the collecting focus has been on items relevant to the region.

Read more




The Art Gallery acknowledges the support of our major sponsors.

Newcastle City Council

Newcastle Region Art Gallery Foundation logo    

 Newcastle Art Gallery Society logo   

artsNSW


Our corporate partners include:

 

Pepper Tree Wines

 

ABC1233

 

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ARTCART sponsors:

BMT Tax Depreciation logo

 

The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney logo

 

Mega Pacific Newcastle logo

 

S&S Creativity unlimited logo

 

 




Address
Newcastle Art Gallery
1 Laman Street
Newcastle NSW 2300

Postal Address
PO Box 489
Newcastle NSW 2300

Telephone
+61 2 4974 5100

Facsimile
+61 2 4974 5105

Email
artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au




Donations 

Newcastle Art Gallery’s collection was established through the generousity and  philanthropy of individuals who endeavoured to broaden the cultural life of Newcastle.

Under the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program the Australian Taxation Office now provides tax incentives to encourage gifts of culturally significant items from private collections to public institutions. This program has greatly enhanced the Gallery’s collection. Many of these donations are an acknowledgement of the Gallery’s past and its role in the community and have been gifted with an expectation of the Gallery’s future redevelopment.

There are several ways that you can personally support the Gallery’s activities and contribute to a project or area that is of special interest to you. These include:

  - Donations of cash, property or other assets
  - Making a bequest or legacy in a will
  - Becoming a Member of the Foundation
  - Gifting art through the Cultural Gifts Program

For more information about all aspects of sponsorship and giving, please contact the Director on 02 4974 5100.

 




Ceramics

 

Australian Ceramics

Since the early years of the Gallery’s establishment, but particularly during the 1970s, studio ceramics has been a significant force in Newcastle. The Newcastle Studio Potters group was among the early examples of such collectives formed in Australia and one of the few to purchase its own building, which still operates as a workshop and gallery. Given such an active, long-term engagement with ceramics in the local art community, the depth of the Newcastle Art Gallery ceramics collection comes as no surprise.

Most regional galleries to a large degree reflect the cultural and social interests of their communities, although during the seventies and eighties the Gallery played a leading role in establishing Newcastle as a centre of national significance in ceramics— even initiating and regularly hosting a national ceramics award exhibition.

The strengths of the Australian ceramics collection consists of works from 1950 to the present. However, the scope of the holdings are best illustrated by a comparison of the earliest Australian ceramic work, Beer jug with four mugs 1935 by Anne Dangar with a recent acquisition by Gwyn Hanssen Pigott At the gates 2003. Both of these works may be made from wheel-thrown clay but they are dramatically different in style and intention. The Dangar work is a classic example of studio pottery, functional ware whose claims to artistic merit were based on the form and decoration, in this case applied by Rah Fizelle. The Hanssen Pigott was made to be exhibited as a contemporary work of art, an installation of sculptural forms with absolutely no functional intention.

The divergence between these two works defines not only the direction of the development in ceramics since 1950 but also the great tensions and debates that occurred during that period, between traditional potters and ceramic artists, who argued for no distinction between art and craft. The resplendent non-functional clay forms by Marea Gazzard Mantel pot 1964 and Syros 1973 elegantly put the case for ceramic-based sculpture but many potters believed that the essence of the aesthetic appeal of ceramics was irrevocably dependent on its historical ties to the functional or domestic demands of cup, platter and bowl.

The joke among potters in the 1980s was that a pot became a work of art when you called it a vessel - and, of course, there was some truth in this. A beautifully formed bowl with a deeply lustrous glaze or one of unfathomable complexity and subtlety is a work of art whatever it is called. Les Blakebrough’s porcelain bowl, Southern ice 1995 is but one of many examples from the collection that could be chosen to demonstrate this. The collection contains many ceramic pieces by artists whose works are whimsically or formally sculptural, such as those by Jenny Orchard and Bernard Sahm, respectively, but by far the majority of the works in the ceramic collection confirm that the domestic or functional roots of ceramic practice can provide an inexhaustible source of sustenance for contemporary art. Leading contemporary ceramists such as Louise Boscacci, Victor Greenaway and Pippin Drysdale, with works like her beautiful Constellation I, II, III (Pinnacle series) 1995, also establish that symbolic reference and metaphor are all within the range of the potter’s craft.

 

Japanese Ceramics

The collection of Japanese ceramics in the Newcastle Art Gallery is one of the most significant in Australia. The foundations of the collection were established over thirty years ago at a time when most Australian studio potters were working under the influence of Japanese ceramic traditions.

Traditional Japanese potters always placed primary aesthetic value on the relationship between form and function. From the twelfth century, the development of Japanese pottery and other crafts is inseparable from the increasing importance of the Tea Ceremony as a contemplative ritual with spiritual overtones. Ceramic objects associated with the Tea Ceremony were appreciated for their tactility and simple functionality. Clay objects were beautiful to use and their form honestly expressed the origins of pottery in earth and fire. It was, and remains, a captivating aesthetic. Within the Gallery’s extensive holdings of Japanese ceramics, the Nagano Collection contains 27 prime examples of objects that rigorously maintained these Japanese ceramic traditions of quietude, exquisite subtlety and expression of material origins.

Shôji Hamada (1894 - 1978), the most celebrated potter of the twentieth century is well represented in the collection with eleven items, including Vase from 1970 decorated with a simple creamy-white rice husk glaze and the salt-glazed stoneware Serving bowl. Hamada worked in England in the early 1920s and became an important conduit for the influence of Japanese aesthetics on English and Australian potters but he was also designated as a National Living Treasure in Japan, as were several other potters in the collection.

The Nagano Collection contains representation by many of the great Japanese potters of the twentieth century. In 1985 these were complemented with the acquisition of the Blakebrough Collection. Among the 58 items from this group assembled by the Australian potter Les Blakebrough, while working in Japan during the 1960s, are outstanding works by Takeichi Kawai (1908 - 1991), Kanjirô Kawai (1890 - 1966) and Kentichi Tomimoto (1886 - 1963).

The third element within the aggregation of Japanese ceramics in Newcastle is The Sodeisha Collection. In the 1950s, at the very time when traditional Japanese ceramic attitudes and aesthetics were being embraced by Australian craft workers, young potters in Japan were in rebellion against the constraints of tradition. Yagi Kazuo, Suzuki Osamo, Yamada Hikaru and Kumakura Junkichi were among a group of potters who were seeking to use clay as an expressive medium in its own right without the need to conform to a functional aesthetic. To activate for change and collectively exhibit their work they formed the Sodeisha Group.

The Group expanded over the years in numbers and influence and in 1978 an exhibition of 54 outstanding works by thirty-two members of Sodeisha toured Australia. This exhibition had been organized from the Newcastle Region Art Gallery and on completion of the tour, in 1981, the Group made the decision to donate the entire Sodeisha Collection to Newcastle in recognition of the Gallery’s commitment to Japanese ceramics.

It is now possible to display the full range of Japanese ceramics from traditional to contemporary. The majority of works in the Sodeisha Collection are purely sculptural or non-functional objects that nevertheless express the particular qualities of clay and glaze. In contradiction to all traditional Japanese ceramic practice, many of the Sodeisha potters have taken the lead from other forms of contemporary art by giving titles to their pieces. Examples are: On the table 2 1978 by Hirokuni Katsuno, Message A from KK (I & II) by Rikizô Kawakami, Bridge by Rikichi Miyanaga, and Design plan (face) by Kazuo Yagi 1977. Even when the titles are seemingly descriptive of a functional form, such as Hikaru Yamada’s Semi-cylinder in earthenware, the actual object makes manifest its sculptural intentions. When the Sodeisha Collection toured Australia in the late 1970s it had a significant impact on liberating the attitudes of many Australian ceramic artists who were still under the spell of traditional Japanese functionalist aesthetics.

The cultural exchange between Australia and Japan over the last forty years can be plotted in its most condensed form in the ceramic arts. With the extensive combined collection of Australian and Japanese ceramics in the Newcastle Art Gallery it is possible to trace this rich interaction between two cultures and to appreciate the value of traditional and contemporary approaches to ceramic practice.

 

Written by Ross Woodrow

 




Australian Prints

 

Richard Browne’s Newcastle, in New South Wales with a distant view of Point Stephen 1812 and another of his engravings, View of the Hunters River, near Newcastle, from the same date, are the earliest prints in the collection. There are almost fifty prints from the colonial era in the works on paper holdings and many of these, like Browne’s engravings, relate to the early history of the Hunter region. Prints by Walter Preston and Joseph Lycett are strongly represented along with works by J. H. Clark and John Skinner Prout. The collection also contains many of the other images by S. T. Gill and Eugène von Guérard that circulated throughout Australia and Britain, representing picturesque views of colonial landscapes and life on the gold fields. Such prints are important historical documents but because of the great rarity of material for this period the collecting focus has been on items relevant to the region.

The great strength of the collection is in twentieth-century and contemporary original artist’s prints. The Newcastle Region Art Gallery is nationally recognized for the quality and depth of its print collection and no doubt this is partly due to the fact that it is one of the few galleries, state or regional, that has published a comprehensive catalogue of its holdings; in particular, a four-volume fully-illustrated catalogue from 1812 to 1996. Now approaching 800 items, the collection includes important complete suites, series and folios: John Coburn’s Seven days of Creation, Lloyd Rees’ Australian Landscape I - IV, Keith Looby’s History of Australia,Imants Tillers and George Baldessin’s According to Des Esseintes, Arthur Boyd’s Narcissus Suite, Jan Senberg’s Voyage Six - Antarctica, Bea Maddock’s Forty pages from Antarctica and Mike Parr’s Untitled self portrait (1989).

In the first half of the twentieth century both conservative artists and modernists gave particular attention to production of prints and this has resulted in a great variety of works from this period. Along side the compulsively detailed etchings, drypoints and wood engravings of traditionalists, exemplified by Lionel Lindsay, the collection holds the bold prints of progressives such as Jessie Traill and Eirene Mort and decorative icons by the modernists Margaret Preston and Thea Proctor. Proctor’s woodcut The Rose 1927 was derived from a cover design she produced for the ultra-stylish magazine the Home.

For the period 1965 to 1985 the collection is exhaustively inclusive since this was the period of an enormous Australian and international resurgence of interest in printmaking. Many leading painters, both abstract and figurative, were engaged in the print renaissance. Of these, Fred Williams is particularly well represented in the print collection, as is John Brack, Sydney Ball, John Olsen and Bea Maddock. Such was the interest in printmaking during the 1970s that a number of artists made the print their primary medium of expression. Barbara Hanrahan was one of these. Tart and stars 1975 is typical of the prints that gained her national acclaim. Newcastle also figured in this print revival through the work of the Newcastle Printmaker’s Workshop. East End: Before and After was a huge collective printmaking project based on the history of Newcastle's East End around Nobbys Head. The project, exhibited in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery in 1985, achieved national recognition and the collection of prints were later acquired by the National Gallery of Australia.

Contemporary printmaking has been invigorated by new digital technology. But many contemporary artists, most notably Imants Tillers and Mike Parr, have shown that the traditional approaches still have great potential for powerful pictorial expression. Recent acquisitions have included new digital print formats along with more traditional printmaking forms.

 

Written by Ross Woodrow




Just as a novice architect might arduously fashion a replica of their favourite building, James Angus has made a copy in aircraft plywood and medium density fibreboard (MDF) of Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana, an exemplar of Fascist architecture situated in Rome. Only Angus has recreated the Italian Modernist tower four times over and joined each of his four models end to end and twisted them to create a möebius loop. The möebius loop is a three dimensional form that only has one edge and one side, an emblem of infinity that defies physical laws. Invented by German mathematician, August Möebius, the loop is a fitting form to describe art and architecture’s perpetual cycle of self-reference.

Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana is an intriguing play with form and space, an Escher-like contortion, resembling the embellished marine forms found in Renaissance collections more than Modernist design. What is in reality a strident, phallic skyscraper has been simulated and transformed into an elegant, feminine form where the repetitious colonnades of the Italian building read as decorative striations on a larger than life organism. The unfinished Fascist monument has been made complete as an ornate orb small enough to be enveloped by the human body.




Untitled snake oil is an installation of different shaped and coloured drinking glasses, placed upside down and adorned with strange, elegant forms. To produce this work, Hany Armanious has cast the negative space within each glass, the space usually reserved for liquids, in a liquid form of petroleum called ‘hotmelt’. The cast space, which has become solid emptiness, is placed on top of each inverted glass. The glass therefore becomes a tiny pedestal for each mould, a clever play on the traditional sculpture and plinth.

By altering the physical presentation of a found object, Armanious transforms the everyday and by placing the work within a glass display case the work takes on a rare and precious quality. The banal form and function of the drinking glass and the formless quality of liquid petroleum are transformed into a sculptural presence. Armanious is obsessed with the magical properties of the casting process and many of his works deal with the alchemical transformation of one substance into another via what the artist describes as the ‘cult of casting’.




Council has an obligation to protect the privacy of site users. This statement describes what information is collected, and why it is collected.

Privacy Statement

Newcastle City Council is committed to protecting your personal information. This Statement outlines Council’s practices relating to personal information obtained through access to its website. This statement is provided in accordance with the “Guidelines for Government Websites” issued by the Australian Privacy Commissioner.

Council has adopted a Privacy Management Plan in accordance with the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (the Privacy Act). It is recommended that you read the Privacy Management Plan prior to submitting any personal information to us. Newcastle City Council respects and protects the privacy of users.

Collecting information about you from the website

Council will only collect personal information directly from you, or your authorised agent.

The information collected will be for lawful purposes directly related to the functions of Council.

Council will only request information that is necessary for the purpose of the collection.

If you do not wish to provide personal information to Council, it may be unable to provide you with the services required.

In accordance with the Privacy Act you can make application for Council to consider suppressing your personal information from a public register held by Council.

Statistical Information

If you visit Council’s website to read or download information, the following information will be recorded for statistical purposes:

  • Your server’s address.
  • The name of the top level domain from which you access the Internet (for example, .gov, .com, .edu, .org, .au, .nz etc).
  • The type of browser you use.
  • The date and time you accessed its site.
  • The pages you accessed and the documents you downloaded.
  • The previous Internet address from which you linked directly to its site.
  • The Internet address to which you link directly from its site. 

The above information is used to create summary statistics which allow Council to assess the number of visitors to the different sections of its site, discover what information is most and least used, determine technical design specifications, and help it make its site more useful to visitors.

How Council will use your Personal Information

Council will use your information for the purpose for which it was collected.

Council will use your information to understand community and customer needs to continuously improve its services.

Council may use your information to let you know about its services or other information available. (eg Newsletters).

Council may share your information within other sections of Council, its agents and contractors to expedite services to its customers. The provisions of the Privacy Act bind council’s agents and contractors.

Disclosure of your Personal Information
Council will only disclose your personal information if: you have consented to the disclosure. The disclosure is required or permitted by legislation. Where it is necessary to lessen a threat to someone’s life or health.

Accuracy of your Personal Information

Council will take reasonable care to ensure that the personal information it collects, uses or discloses is accurate, complete and up to date.

Storage and Security of your Personal Information

Council will take all reasonable steps to protect the personal information it holds from misuse, unauthorised access and modification.

How to Access, Correct or Update your Personal Information

If you want to know exactly what personal information Council is holding about you, you are welcome to request such information by contacting Council’s Privacy Officer.

You can apply to Council to amend your personal information to ensure it is relevant, up to date, complete and not misleading.

How we Dispose of your Personal Information

Council will dispose of your personal information in accordance with the State Records General Disposal Authority.10 (GDA10).

Other Important Information

Cookies

Council tracks the pattern of visitor usage using a facility called a cookie. This cookie identifies and recognises the computer (but not the person using the computer) when you visit Council’s website.

Cookies are pieces of information that a website can transfer to an individual’s computer hard drive for record keeping.

The use of cookies is an industry standard and you will find most major websites use them. Most Internet browsers are pre-set to accept cookies. If you prefer not to receive cookies, you can adjust your Internet browser to disable cookies or to warn you when cookies are being used.

Links to other Websites

Council’s website contains links to other websites. These linked sites are not under the control of Council.

Council is not responsible for the management or protection of any personal information you provide to these sites.

Before disclosing your personal information on any other web-site Council recommends you examine the terms and conditions of using that website.

Children’s Privacy

Council will take all reasonable steps to protect the privacy of children.

Council asks that children under the age of 18 have a parent or guardian submit personal information on their behalf when required.

Contacting Newcastle City Council Online by e-mail

Newcastle City Council will only record your e-mail address if you choose to send it a message. It will only be used for the purpose for which you have provided it and will not be added to any mailing list. Council will not use your e-mail address for any other purpose, and will not disclose it without your consent.

Subscribe and Unsubscribe e-mail Service

The Newcastle City Council Online site offers a subscribe and unsubscribe e-mail service for those people who wish to receive the Newcastle City Council Online news and other updates via its list-serv system. When you subscribe to this service your e-mail address and, as an option, your name is added to a database. This information is used only to provide the service and will not be used for any other purpose, and it will not be disclosed without your consent.

Changes to this Statement

Council will occasionally update this privacy statement. When it is updated Council will revise the “last updated” date at the top of the statement.

How to Contact Us

If you have any questions please contact us or telephone Councils Privacy Officer on 4974 2118.

Other information can be obtained from Privacy NSW.

Copyright

Council reserves copyright on its publications.

The content of this site is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part of any such content may be reproduced, modified, adapted or published in any way for any commercial purposes whatsoever.

Requests and enquiries concerning reproduction and copyright should be addressed in writing to:

The General Manager
Newcastle City Council
PO Box 489
NEWCASTLE NSW 2300

Other Sites

Newcastle City Council has no control over the content of material accessible on any site cross-referenced. It accordingly is the responsibility of the Internet user to make their own decisions about the relevance or accuracy, currency and reliability of information found on those sites.

In addition, Newcastle City Council does not necessarily endorse or support the views, opinions, standards or information expressed at linked sites. They have been set up as information sources only.

Disclaimer

Newcastle City Council is committed to quality service and makes every attempt to ensure accuracy, currency and reliability of the data contained in these documents. However changes in circumstances after time of publication may impact the quality of this information. It is the responsibility of the user to make his/her own decisions about the correctness of information found.

Other Documents

Department of Local Government PPIPA Management Plan (110Kb PDF). The Management Plan provides a framework to guide councils in helping to manage the State of New South Wales' relationship with local government.

Hunter Councils Personal and Privacy Management Procedures (372Kb PDF). A tool to assist Local Government in the Hunter Valley in the management, storage and collection of personal and private information.

PPIP Code of Practice for Local Government (122Kb PDF). This Privacy Code of Practice is made under Part 3 Division 1 of the PPIP Act. The effect of this Code is to modify :

  • The Information Protection Principles contained in Part 2, Division 1 of the PPIPA; and
  • the provisions of Part 6 of the PPIPA, as they relate to Local Government

Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (247Kb PDF). PDF version of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998.




A panoramic photograph documents a natural disaster where a red stain invades pristine, verdant rainforest. On close inspection the blood like stain is revealed to be lurid nineteen seventies carpet, the type of carpet found in RSL clubs and Chinese restaurants across Australia. Axminster carpet, a clever trope for the British colonisation of Australia, is meticulously laid in a secret location in Jervis Bay National Park by a team of professional carpet layers and then documented. This dramatic and Romantic intervention is Rosemary Laing’s groundspeed.

No digital manipulation has taken place to produce this series, the physical process of entering the landscape and laying carpet mimics the ongoing colonising and domesticating of native environments. This absurd, excessive act along with the Baroque patterning of the carpet speaks of our attempts to out-do nature and reminds us of the symbolism of the carpet as an exotic garden brought indoors, of tamed wilderness and nature made culture.




Council has an obligation to protect the privacy of site users. This statement describes what information is collected, and why it is collected.

Privacy Statement

Newcastle City Council is committed to protecting your personal information. This Statement outlines Council’s practices relating to personal information obtained through access to its website. This statement is provided in accordance with the “Guidelines for Government Websites” issued by the Australian Privacy Commissioner.

Council has adopted a Privacy Management Plan in accordance with the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (the Privacy Act). It is recommended that you read the Privacy Management Plan prior to submitting any personal information to us. Newcastle City Council respects and protects the privacy of users.

Collecting information about you from the website

Council will only collect personal information directly from you, or your authorised agent.

The information collected will be for lawful purposes directly related to the functions of Council.

Council will only request information that is necessary for the purpose of the collection.

If you do not wish to provide personal information to Council, it may be unable to provide you with the services required.

In accordance with the Privacy Act you can make application for Council to consider suppressing your personal information from a public register held by Council.

Statistical Information

If you visit Council’s website to read or download information, the following information will be recorded for statistical purposes:

  • Your server’s address.
  • The name of the top level domain from which you access the Internet (for example, .gov, .com, .edu, .org, .au, .nz etc).
  • The type of browser you use.
  • The date and time you accessed its site.
  • The pages you accessed and the documents you downloaded.
  • The previous Internet address from which you linked directly to its site.
  • The Internet address to which you link directly from its site. 

The above information is used to create summary statistics which allow Council to assess the number of visitors to the different sections of its site, discover what information is most and least used, determine technical design specifications, and help it make its site more useful to visitors.

How Council will use your Personal Information

Council will use your information for the purpose for which it was collected.

Council will use your information to understand community and customer needs to continuously improve its services.

Council may use your information to let you know about its services or other information available. (eg Newsletters).

Council may share your information within other sections of Council, its agents and contractors to expedite services to its customers. The provisions of the Privacy Act bind council’s agents and contractors.

Disclosure of your Personal Information
Council will only disclose your personal information if: you have consented to the disclosure. The disclosure is required or permitted by legislation. Where it is necessary to lessen a threat to someone’s life or health.

Accuracy of your Personal Information

Council will take reasonable care to ensure that the personal information it collects, uses or discloses is accurate, complete and up to date.

Storage and Security of your Personal Information

Council will take all reasonable steps to protect the personal information it holds from misuse, unauthorised access and modification.

How to Access, Correct or Update your Personal Information

If you want to know exactly what personal information Council is holding about you, you are welcome to request such information by contacting Council’s Privacy Officer.

You can apply to Council to amend your personal information to ensure it is relevant, up to date, complete and not misleading.

How we Dispose of your Personal Information

Council will dispose of your personal information in accordance with the State Records General Disposal Authority.10 (GDA10).

Other Important Information

Cookies

Council tracks the pattern of visitor usage using a facility called a cookie. This cookie identifies and recognises the computer (but not the person using the computer) when you visit Council’s website.

Cookies are pieces of information that a website can transfer to an individual’s computer hard drive for record keeping.

The use of cookies is an industry standard and you will find most major websites use them. Most Internet browsers are pre-set to accept cookies. If you prefer not to receive cookies, you can adjust your Internet browser to disable cookies or to warn you when cookies are being used.

Links to other Websites

Council’s website contains links to other websites. These linked sites are not under the control of Council.

Council is not responsible for the management or protection of any personal information you provide to these sites.

Before disclosing your personal information on any other web-site Council recommends you examine the terms and conditions of using that website.

Children’s Privacy

Council will take all reasonable steps to protect the privacy of children.

Council asks that children under the age of 18 have a parent or guardian submit personal information on their behalf when required.

Contacting Newcastle City Council Online by e-mail

Newcastle City Council will only record your e-mail address if you choose to send it a message. It will only be used for the purpose for which you have provided it and will not be added to any mailing list. Council will not use your e-mail address for any other purpose, and will not disclose it without your consent.

Subscribe and Unsubscribe e-mail Service

The Newcastle City Council Online site offers a subscribe and unsubscribe e-mail service for those people who wish to receive the Newcastle City Council Online news and other updates via its list-serv system. When you subscribe to this service your e-mail address and, as an option, your name is added to a database. This information is used only to provide the service and will not be used for any other purpose, and it will not be disclosed without your consent.

Changes to this Statement

Council will occasionally update this privacy statement. When it is updated Council will revise the “last updated” date at the top of the statement.

How to Contact Us

If you have any questions please contact us or telephone Councils Privacy Officer on 4974 2118.

Other information can be obtained from Privacy NSW.

Copyright

Council reserves copyright on its publications.

The content of this site is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part of any such content may be reproduced, modified, adapted or published in any way for any commercial purposes whatsoever.

Requests and enquiries concerning reproduction and copyright should be addressed in writing to:

The General Manager
Newcastle City Council
PO Box 489
NEWCASTLE NSW 2300

Other Sites

Newcastle City Council has no control over the content of material accessible on any site cross-referenced. It accordingly is the responsibility of the Internet user to make their own decisions about the relevance or accuracy, currency and reliability of information found on those sites.

In addition, Newcastle City Council does not necessarily endorse or support the views, opinions, standards or information expressed at linked sites. They have been set up as information sources only.

Disclaimer

Newcastle City Council is committed to quality service and makes every attempt to ensure accuracy, currency and reliability of the data contained in these documents. However changes in circumstances after time of publication may impact the quality of this information. It is the responsibility of the user to make his/her own decisions about the correctness of information found.

Other Documents

Department of Local Government PPIPA Management Plan (110Kb PDF). The Management Plan provides a framework to guide councils in helping to manage the State of New South Wales' relationship with local government.

Hunter Councils Personal and Privacy Management Procedures (372Kb PDF). A tool to assist Local Government in the Hunter Valley in the management, storage and collection of personal and private information.

PPIP Code of Practice for Local Government (122Kb PDF). This Privacy Code of Practice is made under Part 3 Division 1 of the PPIP Act. The effect of this Code is to modify :

  • The Information Protection Principles contained in Part 2, Division 1 of the PPIPA; and
  • the provisions of Part 6 of the PPIPA, as they relate to Local Government

Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (247Kb PDF). PDF version of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998.




Three weird little guys made from what looks like liquid metal adorn a gallery plinth. Inspired by the world of toys artist Michael Doolan enacts a perverse reversal where the cheap and disposable child’s toy is transformed into a precious and permanent sculptural object. Doolan constructs his bizarre creatures using traditional hand building techniques and each object is then fired up to one dozen times to produce its transformative platinum-lustred surface. This surface carries the associations of top end consumer goods, the recent craze for stainless steel appliances for example. Their highly reflective faux liquid surfaces also prevent the objects from assuming fixed identities; like the Terminator’s liquid man, they appear to be in a constant state of transformation.

Comparisons have frequently been made between the sculptures of Michael Doolan and Jeff Koons, specifically with Koons’ calling card 1986 stainless steel Rabbit. Rather than emulating the seamless perfection of assembly line commodity production, Doolan cultivates the quirky, personalized appearance of his figures. Visible seams and impression marks of molding instruments reveal the traces of hand modeling.

For Doolan the shiny surfaces also implicate the viewer in the work. As the viewer gets close they catch themselves in the reflective figures. Doolan refuses to give the figures facial characteristics demanding that it is in fact the viewer’s reflection that he is most interested in capturing. The viewer is caught up in the gaze of the figure, entangled in the narcissistic, and often absurd, cycle of consumption.




Texta lids, abandoned shopping lists, a restaurant napkin, archived fingernail clippings and Easter egg wrappers have all found their way into Peter Atkins’ Brunswick journal: part 4, a visual diary of the artist’s experiences in Melbourne in 2002.

Atkins has a passion for travelling and collecting. In the late 1980s he began travelling and composing visual journals of his meandering. These journals are powerful distillations of his personal and cultural encounters, comprised mostly of non-precious found objects, each journal series is a carefully re-presented formal arrangement of objects. For Atkins, the physical stuff, the form and materiality of the banal mass-produced object and the context and significance of the artist’s encounter with that object, holds intense power and fascination. Repetitions of line, colour and form render the familiar strange, beautiful and often humorous. These small, square formatted works reveal the artist’s absorption in the everyday as a never-ending source of inspiration.




Australian Drawing

 

The collection includes some notable nineteenth-century drawings, such as Adelaide Ironside’s Self portrait 1855, but the bulk of quality holdings of works on paper are from the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on drawings produced in the period since the establishment of the Gallery in 1957. From 1900 onwards, the collection is of such depth that in 1984 and 2005 the Gallery was able to mount survey exhibitions of drawing in Australia with major representation by most significant twentieth-century Australian artists along with prime examples by many contemporary practitioners.

While many drawings are preliminary studies for, or related to, major paintings or sculpture in the collection, the aim has always been to build a comprehensive inventory of drawing as a primary activity in its own right. Twentieth-century artists, such as Lloyd Rees and William Dobell, who both placed great emphasis on drawing as an autonomous activity and as a prelude to painting, are particularly well represented. Dobell’s Self portrait 1940 was completed for presentation as a finished work whereas another Self portrait drawing in the collection from around 1965 was meant as a searching study for a painting, even though the painting never eventuated.

In his drawing and printmaking, Lloyd Rees gave distinct attention to expressing the graphic qualities of his medium, so it is not surprising that none of his drawings held in Newcastle relate directly to paintings. They are all independent expressions of the unique qualities of pencil, in the case of The Fig tree (No. 4) 1934, or ink, as in South Coast landscape from 1936. This latter work is one of only three such examples where Rees painstakingly created the contours of the landscape and the delicate gradations of light by using ink in a combination of wash and obsessive stippling.

Drawings by sculptors have always been regarded as a special category and Newcastle has an interesting selection by Lyndon Dadswell, Frank Hinder, Margel Hinder and Robert Klippel. Many of the drawings by the Hinders were produced during the period 1961 to 1966 when the couple were often in Newcastle while Margel completed her commission for the Captain Cook Memorial Fountain in Civic Park. This was Margel Hinder’s largest public work and one of the most highly acclaimed public fountains in Australia. It is such a distinctive feature of the City that it became the basis for the emblem of the Newcastle City Council.

The holdings comprehensively represent the work of Joy Hester, Donald Friend and Francis Lymburner who are among the rare few Australian artists using drawing as their almost singular activity. Each developed characteristic styles mostly using ink highlighted with added colour. The results, such as Hesters’ Boy with pink arms (Sweeney) 1955, retained the spontaneity of drawing along with a boldness or gravity that could compete with oil paintings on canvas.

Drawing has always played a central role in the teaching or training of painters. It was often through their drawings that Australian artists such as George Lambert, Godfrey Miller, Rah Fizelle and John Passmore exerted their influence on younger artists. Along with these artists, the collection also has representation by the influential artists working as teachers in Newcastle over recent years. These include Reg Russom, Robert Ward, John Montefiore, Gary Jones, Frank Celtlan, Trevor Weekes, Michael Bell and Clare Martin.

 

Written by Ross Woodrow




Australian Painting

 

Newcastle Art Gallery contains one of the few collections in regional Australia where it is possible to chart the complex history of art in Australia with works of stellar quality. Paintings dominate the key holdings since, from the time Europeans arrived in Australia, painting has been the ascendant form of expression in the visual arts. Before this, Indigenous Australians painted on bark and stone but the new arrivals did not take particular interest, since their vision of art was attuned to Europe.

Eighteenth and early nineteenth-century European artists looked to Greek mythology as a primary source for inspiration. For example, in 1813 John Glover painted a vision of the mythical home of the Greek gods as he imagined it from his London studio. The result, View of Mount Olympus and the town of Brusa, is one of Glover’s largest known paintings. It is a masterwork of the Romantic movement whose artists favoured picturesque scenes that would fire the imagination through poetic rather than purely descriptive painting.

Seventeen years after painting this vision of Mt Olympus, Glover became the first major artist to immigrate to Australia. This decision to bring his family to Van Diemen’s Land, adventurous for a sixty-four year old successful painter, paid handsome dividends.

Glover established a successful farm he called Patterdale on the northern slopes of Ben Lomond in north-eastern Tasmania and continued to practise his art; demonstrating it was possible to adapt the techniques and methods of composition he had used in painting the Lake District of England to depict the untidy eucalypt scrub of Australia. Glover died in 1849 after almost twenty fruitful years of painting in Tasmania. His View of Mount Olympus did not make the trip from London to Australia until 1971 when it arrived in Newcastle after being purchased through the dealer Joseph Brown by the NRAG, supported by the Newcastle Morning Herald, for $5,000; an amount that now seems like a paltry sum in view of Glover’s current million-dollar prices.

Since Newcastle was first established as a penal settlement it could hardly have been graced with the presence of an artist of Glover’s stature but the recidivist convict Joseph Lycett proved the perfect artist for the time and the place. He had the forger’s skill with details and eye for the main chance. Lycett’s views of Newcastle were made to please his gaolers and their audience in England who sought after evidence of the civilizing achievements in the colonies. To satisfy this demand and still retain a ring of authenticity, Lycett took the same tack used during his illegitimate labours as a forger, but the results were very different. An examination of the accuracy of his details might have been the undoing for his counterfeit banknotes, but it proved the making of his paintings.

Inner view of Newcastle by Lycett gives central prominence to Nobbys Headland, the quintessential feature of Newcastle harbour. It was soon after Lycett’s painting was completed that Nobbys was anchored to the mainland with the connecting breakwater that made for a much less hazardous entry to the harbour.

The layout of the town is probably as it was in 1818, although the sense of sanitized order is no doubt the forger’s clever accommodation of Captain James Wallis’s vision for the convict settlement. Artistic licence could only be encouraged when representing the Commandant’s achievements. Therefore the modest grandeur of the recently completed major buildings, the gaol, hospital and church, suggests they may have been in reality something less than imposing. The Christ Church is one of the dominating features of the painting, emphasising the symbolic importance placed on religion as a means of reforming the convicts. Lycett felt the influence more directly than most others since he helped decorate the interior of the church in 1817 when he painted the altar piece and several other panels. The experience didn’t change his ways however, since, after he returned to England following his pardon in 1822, he revisited his criminal craft of making banknote facsimiles. This was subsequent to a failed attempt at a legitimate venture publishing his collection of engravings Views of Australia 1824-25, a project he had begun while in Newcastle.

All of Joseph Lycett’s work from his three-year period in Newcastle was produced for an audience in England, for it was not until the middle of the nineteenth century that the Australian colonies were large enough or wealthy enough to support resident artists.

Conrad Martens arrived in Sydney in 1835 after a period as topographical artist on the Beagle during Charles Darwin’s epoch changing voyage of discovery. Martens soon found a receptive colonial audience for his style of picturesque topography with Sydney Harbour as his primary subject. One such example is the watercolour View of Sydney and Fort Macquarie 1837 in the Gallery’s collection.

Newcastle also holds later works by the first Australian-born professional artist, William Charles Piguenit, who by necessity adopted the prevailing romantic fashion for Arcadian views of Australia. After 1850, the development of his style was influenced by the arrival in Australia of several supremely skilled artists from Europe.

Eugène von Guérard came to Australia from Austria in 1852. Like so many others, he was seeking gold. The discovery of gold changed everything in Australia, although the forty-two year old von Guérard did not strike it lucky on the goldfields of Ballarat. Instead, he went on to become one of the most significant late colonial painters in Australia.

His Lake Gnotuk, near Camperdown 1858 is a superb example of von Guérard’s skilful blend of empirical observation and sentiment inspired by German romanticism. The dark enfolding foreground and the infinitely distant horizon with the middle-distance punctuated by the oddly symmetrical lake, its glass-smooth surface indicating its immense depth, all give a hint of the ‘weird melancholy’ that so many colonials sensed in the Australian bush.

By the 1880s Australian taste in painting began to change towards a lighter, less introspective view of the landscape and a style where brushstrokes were unconstrained by documentative demands. Symbolism was still of prime importance as suggested in Tom Roberts’ Roses 1888, which is as much an essay in decorative paint application as it is a symbolic token of sentiment. Before Eugène von Guérard retired to Europe in 1881 he had been Principal of the Art School of the National Gallery of Victoria where Roberts and many of the next generation of influential Australian painters had been trained. Tom Roberts also sailed for Europe in the same year as von Guérard, returning to Australia in 1885. Primed with knowledge of the latest trends in London and Paris, Roberts teamed up with the young Arthur Streeton to develop the first distinctive Australian school of painting.

The group held painting camps around Heidelberg in Victoria and mounted their first showing of work in Melbourne in 1889 in what is now regarded as one of the most important exhibitions in Australian art history. Such was the impact of the exhibition that Impressionism became a national style. As well as Roberts and Streeton, Charles Conder and Frederick McCubbin were the other core early members of the Australian Impressionist group. These are represented in the Newcastle collection along with many other important proponents of the style such as Jane Sutherland and Ethel Carrick.

In the last decade of the nineteenth century the most admired of the Australian Impressionists was undoubtedly Arthur Streeton, who went on to dominate painting in Australia for the next forty years. The bleached colour and chunky brushwork in the early work by Streeton in the collection, Australian December, the first crop 1887, gives a foretaste of the vigour and freedom of application of his impressionistic technique.

The Gallery also holds a rare early portrait by Streeton and a 1926 virtuoso panel picture, Barrenjoey. The sun-drenched landscapes of the Australian Impressionists were highly influential, so much so that the pastoral landscape became a source of national symbolism well into the twentieth century. Painters such as Hans Heysen, Elioth Grüner, Sydney Long and Lloyd Rees created their own distinctive visions of the Australian landscape and all are represented in the collection with outstanding examples of their work.

The landscape tradition remains so omnipotent that it sometimes overshadows the strong strain of figurative painting in Australia. The best early Australian figurative painters showed that they could also capture the play of dappled light on saturated colour in scenes charged with the added psychological attraction of figures in moments of reverie or meditation.

Rupert Bunny’s Last fine days, Royan (Summertime) 1908 and Hilda Rix Nicholas’ Grace (circa 1914)are striking examples and not surprisingly they are among the most popular paintings in the collection. Bunny and Rix Nicholas were part of the great late nineteenth and early twentieth-century exodus of Australian artists to Europe. They went seeking inspiration from the originating source of culture and these pictures were both painted in France at a time when Paris was the powerhouse of the art world. When Rupert Bunny painted Last fine days, Royan (Summertime) he had already attained fame in France since he had been working there for almost twenty years. During the decade before the First World War, Bunny had exhibited widely in France, England, Russia, Italy and the United States, making him the first Australian artist to achieve international fame.

Bunny quietly returned to Australia in 1933 during the great depression and continued painting until his death in 1947. Even though he was always admired by astute critics, it took some time for Bunny to achieve the reputation he now has as one of the greatest Australian painters. During the Australian art market boom in the 1980s, the prices for his works soared to astronomical levels with dealers, collectors and curators scouring the world to retrieve his undiscovered works. One Sydney paper headlined it as the “Great Bunny Hunt”. In such a competitive climate no regional gallery could afford even a small picture but this wasn’t why the staff at the Newcastle Region Art Gallery were left looking on with bemused wonder. The Gallery’s collection contained sixteen Rupert Bunny works including not only Last fine days, Royan (Summertime) purchased in 1962, but also major paintings from every period in his career. Almost overnight, they saw these works turn into a multi-million dollar asset for the Gallery. The reason that Newcastle has such a magnificent collection of Rupert Bunny pictures is because the Gallery’s second Director, David Thomas, was an expert on Bunny’s work. Thomas mounted a major Rupert Bunny retrospective in Newcastle in 1968 and published a monograph on the artist. Because of his knowledge and contacts, David Thomas purchased astutely and attracted bequests to create a comprehensive survey of the artist’s work and a superb cultural legacy for the city.  

It is far less surprising to discover the strength of the Gallery’s holdings of almost forty works by William Dobell, the greatest Australian portrait painter of the twentieth century. Dobell was born in Newcastle and the house where he lived as a child is a short walk from the Gallery. He spent his late career living on the banks of Lake Macquarie at Wangi Wangi, having retreated there in 1944 after the scandalous Sydney court case when his Archibald Prize win was contested by a group of conservative artists. This disaffected group claimed Dobell’s portrait of Joshua Smith was a caricature and not a portrait as stipulated by the conditions of the Archibald. The trial was front-page news across Australia, generating the sort of publicity that most artists would have craved, but Dobell was not that sort of artist. He won the case but lost the privacy he coveted. Dobell’s portraits always flirted with caricature; that is their great strength. His teasing distortions of his subjects stripped sentimentality and arrogance from them, but Dobell mostly left his sitter’s dignity intact. In his best portraits, the quizzical appearance of the subject’s features is foiled by Dobell’s obsessively complex treatment of the painted surface. To understand the secret of Dobell’s portraits they have to be carefully examined in the flesh since they are painted with the delicacy of touch and unerring finesse of a reconstructive surgeon. Portrait of a strapper 1941, one of his great portraits and one of the iconic images in Australian art,was presented to Newcastle in 1959 by Captain Neil McEacharn. Dobell’s transformation of an anonymous stable hand into a monumental Australian type appears effortless but it took months to work this magic.

The mannered display of rug and bridle strap is Dobell’s concession to the European tradition of adding professional attributes to a sitter’s portrait but the whimsical infiltration of equine character into the strapper’s features is pure Dobell. The overall effect is a distinctly Australian depreciation of pomposity, of tradition, of self. Such disparagement also touches the core of Dobell’s art, and perhaps another feature of the Australian character, a deep pessimism masked by a genial façade. Dobell’s anxiety comes closer to the surface in his unsettling New Guinea paintings. The bitter sweet combinations of colours, dramatic contrasts of scale and disruptive shapes in works such as Boy with bow 1953 leave the impression that things could unravel very quickly.

Up until his death in 1970, Dobell was a great supporter of the Newcastle Region Art Gallery, showing his work and attending social events. Even though he shunned publicity he was a charming mixer in any company, be it a formal civic event or down at the local pub. Dobell was always perplexed at being described as a modernist since he saw his work as a continuation of the academic traditions of painting. His devotion to, and dependence on, sound observational drawing supports his contention. All of his interest in technical mastery of line and form was as a means to the end of creating portraits and subject pictures. Obviously, Dobell appreciated a well-composed picture, but the idea of a painting as primarily an ensemble of abstract shapes was outside of his lexicon. The defining feature of early modern art was this shift away from painting a personal record of natural perception to the creation of paintings as dazzling surrogates for visual experience. This move toward an abstract view of the world can be beautifully demonstrated through key examples of early twentieth-century modernist painting in the Newcastle collection.

The pioneers of modern painting in Australia, Margaret Preston, Roland Wakelin and Grace Cossington Smith are well represented. In Boatsheds 1918, Roland Wakelin takes a most humble subject and translates it into a symphony of shape and colour. Wakelin was interested in advanced theories of simultaneity between colours and musical notes which explains the rainbow transformation of the once drab boat sheds. Every part of the picture surface vibrates with colour, yet the carefully constructed or composed forms of the buildings give a stability suggesting a muffled influence of Cubism. The features that charm the viewer today were the source of the painting’s radicality in 1918, as it created immense controversy when it was exhibited in Sydney at that time and in the next year. The painting is a pivotal work in the development of modern art in Australia.

Grace Cossington Smith’s Trees (circa 1927) is another. Cossington Smith may have been one of the few Australian artists to take a keen interest in the developments of modern art in Europe but she hardly fitted the profile of a radical modernist. Her experiments in modernism were conducted over a lifetime spent painting in the same house in the Sydney suburb of Turramurra. Almost all of her paintings drew their sources from her immediate surroundings in Sydney, particularly the domestic confines of her house. In the case of Trees, the basis was the view from her back verandah looking across a tennis court to a large screen of trees behind several blooming peach trees. Her early contact with advanced art from Paris and London had liberated her attitude and painting became an endless exploration of light and colour.

Her hermetic devotion to the same domestic realm only concentrated the intensity of her life-time of experiments to make timeless paintings with “form in pure colour vibrating with light,” as she put it in when writing about Way to the Studio 1957, also in the Newcastle collection. Yet another Cossington Smith painting in the collection is Strike (circa 1917). This little jewel of a painting demonstrates that even when Cossington Smith depicted topical events she concentrated on the painterly values of light, colour and composition and this is why the picture continues to hold its fascination long after the passion and politics that motivated it have subsided.

Grace Cossington Smith’s restrained or even genteel devotion to her art could not be more of a contrast to the full-throttle approach of Margaret Preston. Preston was an artist with a mission— to establish a genuine Australian modernist idiom to replace the pervasive pastoral landscape tradition, the ‘gumleaf school’ as she called it. Her quest for a decorative, vernacular modernism took an extraordinarily eclectic turn as she sought sources for her prints and paintings from a range as diverse as French art magazines and Aboriginal war shields. Preston could be culturally insensitive and brash, standing on enough of her contemporaries’ toes to be referred to as ‘Mad Maggie’— behind her back, naturally— but she was the most prolific and important advocate of modern art in Australia between the Wars. She was a restless spirit and travelled widely throughout her sixty productive years both outside and inside Australia.

In later life, Preston visited Newcastle to lecture on art and took a particular interest in the city, bequeathing part of her art library to the Gallery. The collection is richly endowed with Margaret Preston prints as well as the painting Native Flowers 1941 which represents her particular blend of modernist abstraction, native flowers and designs derived from Aboriginal art.

While the decorative and domestic basis of Preston’s art did establish an alternative to the pastoral tradition in Australia, at the same time Russell Drysdale was demonstrating that the red heart of Australia offered possibilities for a fresh view of landscape painting. Drysdale’s The Crow trap 1941 epitomises his harsh Australian vision where figures are just some of the oddities and weird shapes that populate the alien vista. The only figures that ever found congruence with Drysdale’s landscapes were the Aboriginal subjects he painted during the 1950s. As in his Mother and Child 1953, in the NAG collection, the Aboriginal figures were immingled with the country by being placed close up to the picture plane and enveloped by the surrounding landscape. The originality of Drysdale's vision of the Australian landscape has been blunted by the many imitators that followed, since by the end of the 1950s the estranged red centre had become as much a part of the national ethos as the radiant, golden summers of the Australian Impressionists.

In the 1960s, however, Fred Williams revitalized landscape painting in Australia. Williams’ selection of colour and the way his remnants of foliage seem to float on top of the ground owed something to Drysdale but Fred Williams learnt much by looking further back to the paintings of Eugène von Guérard. Like von Guérard, Williams wanted to paint landscapes that were dislocating in their vastness while retaining the intimacy of the familiar. His attempt to create an evocation of the general forms of the landscape rather than a particular record of a single view was so successful that it is now common to hear certain landscapes referred to as looking like a Fred Williams’ painting.

The Newcastle Region Gallery has an excellent representative collection of the work of Fred Williams. Most of the purchases were selected in the 1960s during the tenure of the first and second Directors of the Gallery, Gil Docking and David Thomas. Naturally enough, the policy of purchasing exciting new work did not please the conservative elements in Newcastle who were outraged in 1966 when the Gallery paid $1,700 for the glorious Landscape in Upwey 1965-66. The Director, David Thomas, was not daunted by this opposition and he was so sure of the quality of Fred Williams’ paintings that in 1971 he mounted the first ever public showing of the artist’s work in the Newcastle Art Gallery. Time has vindicated his judgement a thousand fold and the Newcastle public have access to definitive works by the most celebrated and sought after Australian landscape painter of the last half of the twentieth century.

Late in his career Arthur Boyd also made an original contribution to Australian landscape painting. Working from the base of his property Bundanon he produced sumptuous, expressive views along the Shoalhaven River. The work in the NAG collection, Shoalhaven River afternoon 1983 is one of the highlights of a series of massive paintings he produced during the 1980s. The scale of this image of Pulpit Rock on the banks of the river is big enough to swallow up a viewer in the seeming acres of paint that Boyd, sometimes literally, swept across the canvas with a broom.

Boyd’s earlier, more sedate landscapes and bold figurative compositions are also represented in the collection with prime examples. Boyd returned to Australia in the 1970s after many years working in Britain. Like his great contemporary, Sidney Nolan, he found that being based close to a major art centre such as London was most important to maintain the international success he had achieved.

Nolan spent the major part of his career working in Britain and he died in London in 1992. However he was a regular visitor to Australia since it remained the primary source of his inspiration from the 1940s when his reputation was established through his Ned Kelly paintings that ultimately became the most iconic images in Australian culture. Nolan was always a technical maestro with a most intelligent pictorial sense for the quirky and idiosyncratic that is so often associated with Australian bush characters and so perfectly encapsulated in Easter Show from 1964.

As with Nolan and Boyd, many Australian artists who came to prominence in the 1950s remained committed to figurative painting. Robert Dickerson and Charles Blackman both painted human dramas in urban or suburban settings. Blackman's Running boy, walking girl 1954, his Night tide at Flinders 1958 and The Student 1961 along with Dickerson's Guy 1957 and Paddy's market 1969, are all anxious visions of emotional alienation as much as they are scenes of physical isolation.

When it comes to expressive exuberance, there were few twentieth-century Australian painters to match the Newcastle-born artists Jon Molvig and John Olsen. Before moving to Sydney and later Brisbane, Molvig had worked at the Newcastle steel works and many of his works from the 1960s reflect his memories of an industrial landscape. He had a gift for insightful portraiture and flair for emotive expressionistic figure studies, and the full range of his work is represented in the collection. John Olsen has said that his formative years spent in Newcastle also influenced his early work but his painting would develop a light-hearted lyricism at the opposite end of the expressionistic spectrum to Molvig’s dark, brooding introspection. In 1980, Olsen revitalized his cultural connection to the City when he returned to paint a mural commissioned for the foyer of the newly refurbished Newcastle City Hall. The sheer exuberance of his Climbing sun over the Hunter still lights up the entry at the top of the stairs leading into the City Hall. Even so, the most devastatingly stunning work by Olsen in Newcastle is in the Region Art Gallery Collection. Life burst is over six metres long and was originally painted as a ceiling mural for the home of his Sydney dealer in 1964. The title brilliantly captures the painting’s impact as a pyrotechnic science experiment, where miniature amoebic forms trace frenzied trajectories across the cream ground, colliding and exploding into massive sun creatures. It is easy to see why Olsen dominated the art scene in Sydney and Australia during the 1960s with his particular whimsically vulgar brand of abstract expressionism, backed with the boisterous personality of a genuine larrikin.

Just before and during the Second World War a much quieter painting revolution was going on in Sydney. This was the development of geometric abstraction, purely constructivist paintings where dynamic symmetry was created without a dependence on perceptual relationships to natural forms or objects. Sometimes referred to as non-objective abstraction, such work has always demanded an informed and receptive audience. This explains why when Grace Crowley and Ralph Balson first exhibited their constructive abstractions in Sydney in 1944 and 1948 the public took no notice. Along with Rah Fizelle, Grace Crowley set up a progressive art school in Sydney in 1932 after Crowley had spent several years studying the latest Cubist and related painting styles in France. Her French sources are still evident in the works she exhibited in Australia’s first abstract art exhibition Exhibition I at David Jones Gallery, Sydney in 1938. Still Life 1938 in the Newcastle collection is a fine example of this early abstract style. Ralph Balson also exhibited in Exhibition I as he had been a student at the Fizelle-Crowley school, although in later life Grace Crowley said it was Balson who did all the teaching in their relationship.

By the early 1940s they were following a tandem path of experiment leading to purely abstract works such as Balson’s Construction 3 1941 in Newcastle. It would take more than ten years for such an intellectual approach to painting to be accepted in Australia and when the Director Gil Docking purchased this work in 1962 it was a most adventurous decision. No doubt, Docking had picked up the vibrations of the coming storm, as the sixties was to be the decade of abstraction— not the modestly scaled variety of subdued, dynamic symmetry pioneered by Balson and Crowley but the sort that assaulted the viewer with the uncompromising visual power of scale and colour. Variously referred to as hard-edge, minimalist or colour-field abstraction these were paintings that the public could not ignore and mostly they didn’t like what they saw.

The shock of the new is always disconcerting for the public but for curators of contemporary art it is the clarion call to collect. When the National Gallery of Victoria opened its new building in 1968 the decision was made to celebrate the event with an exhibition that would highlight the radical new hard-edge abstraction favoured by many young Australian artists. The result was the landmark exhibition The Field that also toured to the Art Gallery of New South Wales. So fierce was the reaction of the public and some critics, that curators and collectors held back from acquisition of the works, waiting for the reassurance of consensus. Thankfully, the second Director of the Newcastle Art Gallery, David Thomas, kept his head in this maelstrom of outrage and was guided by the two axioms for cultural custodians with modest budgets: buy the best and buy early.

Newcastle Art Gallery had already purchased several of the Field artists long before the show. In fact, Sydney Ball’s Canto No 19 1965 acquired in 1966 was the first work by the artist to enter a public collection. During 1968 and 1969 the Gallery systematically acquired major works by The Field artists. Many, such as Col Jordan’s Daedalus series 7 1968, were purchased in the year they were painted. As a result, the Gallery now holds seminal works by artists that have gone on to become major figures in Australian art. Such works include: Dale Hickeys’ Painting 1968, Robert Hunter’s Untitled 1968, Ron Robertson-Swann’s Rainbow sea 1970 and Peter Booth’s Untitled 1962. In recent years Tony Bishop and Alan Oldfield repaid the Gallery’s early interest in abstract art of the sixties by gifting works they exhibited in The Field and Janet Dawson donated a major work from the same year as the momentous exhibition.

Subsequent Directors have followed David Thomas in building on this strength in sixties abstraction with astute purchases of key works by artists of The Field generation such as James Doolin, Joe Szarbo and Robert Jacks. In total, the Gallery now holds over thirty major works related to this groundbreaking period. As the Gallery has demonstrated on a number of occasions, this is sufficient enough to mount an exhibition of such quality that it concedes nothing to any of the state galleries. When these works are now displayed it is awe not shock that they engender. Their once offensive fields of saturated colour have become serenely contemplative and the realization of how beautifully painted they are increases their dignified status. Most remain uncompromising works and it is difficult to know if their majestic presence results from their scale or the fact that they are like battle-ships, wondrous objects from another era. Most of The Field artists abandoned a minimalist approach and hard-edge abstraction did not last as a dominant force beyond the next decade.

By the end of the 1970s it was commonplace to hear the suggestion that painting had run its course and that minimalism marked its endpoint of development rather than a new beginning. As so often occurs with such assessments, the opposite was about to happen.

Painting returned with a vengeance to be the dominant art form of the 1980s. One of the most interesting aspects of this so-called return to painting was the reassessment of the careers of many Australian artists who had never stopped painting. Keith Looby, Andrew Sibley and Jan Senbergs were of the same generation as the abstract painters in The Field but they had remained devoted to developing a figurative-based approach to painting. Each formulated a highly individual style that came to full maturity during the 1980s. Andrew Sibley’s Reluctant rider: Circus series 1982, that was donated by the artist in 1999, exemplifies his decades of refinement of a personal vision and mastery of his idiosyncratic painting techniques.

Some senior artists such as John Brack, Jeffrey Smart and Margaret Olley had always been admired and collected but in the early 1980s they all became veritable mega- stars. Fortunately, the Gallery already held significant works by all of these artists since the resultant escalation in prices put their major work out of the reach of most regional galleries. Before this radical re-evaluation, Margaret Olley had been busy painting figurative, landscape and still life subjects for fifty years. Sometimes she painted figure-interior or figure-still life combinations as in Self portrait with everlastings from 1974 that was part of the resplendent Anne von Bertouch Collection, bequeathed to the Gallery in 2003. The Newcastle collection also contains straight landscape and still life examples of Olley’s painting. Margaret Olley lived in Newcastle at different times over the years and she has been a most generous supporter of the Gallery.

Peter Booth had exhibited in The Field, but he made a dramatic shift at the end of the 1970s to expressionist works heavy with paint and macabre imagery. By 1984 he was heralded as an international leader of the new painting trend, labelled Neo-Expressionism. Many younger artists also took up the style and Mandy Martin’s massive Folly of 1988 is one of the key works from the period. With dimensions of around three by four and a half metres, the painting is so large that only a purpose-designed gallery such as Newcastle Region can display it. Folly encapsulates the neo-romantic strain in many paintings at that time when artists plundered historical images for source material, particularly the sublime landscapes of nineteenth-century painters such as von Guérard, although their homage was often tinged with an element of parody.

Appropriation was the catch phrase of the 1980s in Australia, as it was internationally. Imants Tillers was a cardinal exponent of the new painting, appropriating nineteenth and twentieth century paintings, comic books and Aboriginal art to create composite pictures made up from arrangements of small canvas boards. Tillers’ White Aborigines (No. 2) 1983 is an emblematic work from the eighties consisting of 100 individual canvas boards.

During the 1990s and the beginning of the first decade of this century artists have continued to demonstrate the relevance of painting as a craft and vehicle for expression. Jon Cattapan’s Body Chart 1995 and Tim Maguire’s Untitled 98U47 1998 demonstrate the evocative power of painting as abstract field and symbolic image.

In his Surface tension No. 3 from 1998 Philip Wolfhagen attests to the continuing validity of the painter’s role as acute observer and translator of the natural world. Probably the most important development in Australian painting over the past two decades has been the recognition of Aboriginal art as a significant force in contemporary visual culture. Artists such as Emily Kame Kngwarreye gained not only national but also international acclaim in recent decades. Thanks to the generosity of benefactors, the Gallery has acquired a number of works by Emily Kngwarreye and other important Aboriginal artists.

 

Written by Ross Woodrow







Guided tours

Every weekend, the Gallery runs free guided tours of current exhibitions for the public. Hosted by volunteer Gallery Guides, the tours last about one hour and provide a glimpse into contemporary and historical art practice. To join a tour, meet the Gallery Guide at the Gallery front counter at 11am. You don't need to book.

We also run tours for children, adults and school groups, and can cater for groups with special requirements and specific interests upon request. For further information, or to make a booking, please contact the Audience Programs Officer on 02 4974 5112 or artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au.


Eye Spy

Due to the success of our trial program Art Play – organised interactive tours for Mother’s groups, Play groups, Daycares and Preschools, Newcastle Art Gallery is excited to announce our new TOTALLY FREE (pre-school aged) program: EYE SPY CHILDREN’S TOURS.

These free organised tours for children 0 – 5 years include:
 - All the fun of Art Play with all new activities and resources
 - Interactive tours for Mother’s groups, Play groups, Daycares and Preschools
 - Groups of 5+ children explore works of art using tactile objects, music and play
 - Book at session at your convenience, anytime Tuesdays to Fridays between 10am and 4pm
 - Eye Spy will be available ALL YEAR, changing with the exhibitions.

Bookings are essential, contact Audience Programs Officer on 02 4974 5112 or artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au.


Teachers

Newcastle Art Gallery has a range of services for schools. Our trained and experienced Gallery Guides can lead your students on exciting tours of current exhibitions. We also conduct Professional Development programs including Teacher’s Previews for selected exhibitions.

There are three tour options:

Guided tour
Guided tours can be devised to suit your needs and may take the form of a twenty minute introductory tour up to a maximum of 45 minutes for a full guided tour. Participants are divided into small groups of 8-10 students to allow active participation. Tours should be booked at least two weeks in advance. Special content can be included in the tour by request.

Guided tour/workshop combination
Available to small groups only (up to 24 students), this combination is usually a maximum of one hour, with students spending half an hour in a guided tour, and half an hour in a workshop which reflects the focus of a current exhibition.

An unguided visit
Just let the Gallery know when you are coming, and we can ensure that other events do not interfere with your visit.

When you contact the Gallery to make a booking for a Schools Visit, we can also advise you on how to best plan for your visit, and provide you with any relevant education resources available for the current exhibitions.

Download the Risk Assessment form for Schools.










Ceramics

Since the early years of the Gallery’s establishment, but particularly during the 1970s, studio ceramics has been a significant force in Newcastle. The Newcastle Studio Potters group was among the early examples of such collectives formed in Australia and one of the few to purchase its own building, which still operates as a workshop and gallery. Given such an active, long-term engagement with ceramics in the local art community, the depth of the Newcastle Art Gallery ceramics collection comes as no surprise.

Read more

 




Resources

The Art Gallery produces education resources to accompany our exhibitions, electronic copies of many of which can be found below. We also have free resource packs filled with past education kids, art trails and exhibition brochures. These are great for teachers.
To receive a resource pack, email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au with your postal address.

Gallery staff may be available to make presentations in targeted areas such as collection development and management, conservation, curatorial and exhibition management, and art education.

 




Public art in Newcastle

One of the most exciting and meaningful areas of art is public art, where creative works spill out from behind Gallery walls and onto the streets.

For many people, their earliest interactions with art are with the public works found within their city, and Newcastle's public art program has been developed with this spirit of community and accessibility in mind.

In 1997 Newcastle City Council developed and implemented a Public art and Placemaking Program to enhance the relationship between Newcastle's communities and the built environment. The Placemaking Program has built on Newcastle City Council's proud tradition of commissioning significant public artworks.

Our public art celebrates and enriches the spaces and places within Newcastle, by commemorating events of significance to our city. The James Cook Memorial Fountain by Margel Hinder serves as an example, built in 1966 and situated in Civic Park for generations past and present to enjoy.

 


View Newcastle Public Art in a larger map


Recently commissioned works of public art include Kelly-Ann Lees Caught (Fig Tree Park, Wickham); Suzie Bleach & Andrew Townsend The Adaptable Migrant (Newcastle Museum cr Merewether Street and Wharf Road Newcastle); John Turier, Jennifer Denzin, Jesse Neale, Rebecca Ramsey, Stephanie Cannon and Darren Atkins Governor’s Garden (Steele Street, Marketown).

Previous works include Grounded 2009, a sculpture by renowned Sydney-based artist John Petrie. Created to commemorate the 2007 Newcastle floods and beaching of the Pasha Bulker, Grounded is constructed from the ship's rudder and is an abstract representation of the ship's bow. The work is an important memory marker for the community and a powerful stand-alone work of art.




Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation

The Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation is the Gallery’s major acquisition fund.

The generosity of Newcastle Art Gallery’s benefactors has ensured that the Gallery has one of the most significant art collections in Australia.

Benefactors include Dr Roland Pope, Anne von Bertouch OAM, Dr Ann Lewis AO, William Bowmore AO, OBE, Les Renfrew, Margaret Olley AC, Keith Clouton and Jim Deas, and Wendy Whiteley OAM.

By joining the Foundation as a benefactor you ensure the Gallery acquires works of art, hosts special events and continues to enrich our community as a vital part of Newcastle’s cultural life.

For as little as $500, you can become a Foundation member.
Download the Membership and donation form here.

Membership levels
General $500
Fellow $5,000
Trustee $15,000
Governor $100,000

The Foundation welcomes individual and corporate benefaction. Membership is cumulative, enabling benefactors to gain higher status through ongoing donations and the gifting of works of art.

In recognition of membership, you will:
 - be invited to have your name listed on the Foundation Honour Board*
 - receive invitations to view public and private collections
 - be invited to special events in Newcastle and beyond
 - receive Foundation newsletters

Bequests
Please consider leaving a gift to the Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation in your will.

*Donors can remain anonymous. The Foundation always respects the privacy of donors, benefactors and members.


For more information about the Foundation, or to become a member, please direct your enquiry to:

P: 02 4940 4606
E: contact@nagfoundation.com.au
M: PO Box 1239 Newcastle NSW 2300

 

2013/14 Directors of the Foundation

Judy Hart - Chairman
Bob Bishop - Vice-Chair
Joshua Walsh - Treasurer
Denise Frost - Secretary
Gael Davies

Christopher Ford
Mark Stephens
Lisa Tierney - Councillor, City of Newcastle
Liz Burcham – Cultural Director


 




Newcastle Art Gallery Society

The Newcastle Art Gallery Society forms an integral part of the social life of the Gallery and Newcastle. It aims to stimulate wide community interest and involvement in the Gallery. Through fundraising and events, the Art Gallery Society is able to provide support for Gallery programs.

Every year the Society arranges lectures and films on the visual arts, special previews of exhibitions and visits to other galleries and collections for its members. Art Gallery Society membership is open to all members of the public, and is a great way to enhance your Gallery experience.

Since 1970, the Society has published the magazine Artemis, which provides an informative digest of exhibitions, acquisitions and people involved in the visual arts.

The Art Gallery Society offers a range of membership options from Individual annual membership for $40 through to Family Life Membership (see membership form for details). Membership enquiries on 02 4974 5123 or gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au



Art Gallery Society Events

COFFEE WITH ART
Morning tea followed by informative talks
First Wednesday of every month (except January and December)
10.30am - 12.00pm
$15 members, $20 non-members
Payable at the door
Bookings required: call 02 4974 5123

Wednesday 5 November 2014 
Artist Shona Wilson reveals the inspiration behind her sculptural assemblages.

 

ANNUAL SOCIETY LECTURE
Creativity: turning it to our advantage
Friday 21 November 2014 6.00pm
$10 payable at the door. Refreshments will be served.
RSVP essential for catering: 02 4974 5123  

Dr Christopher Hartney (BA (Hons) PhD (Sydney) a lecturer in the Department of Studies in Religion at the University of Sydney will discuss how and why art is vital to the renewal of world views and for survival. 

 

CHRISTMAS IN THE GALLERY
Sunday 7 December 2014
from 6.00pm
$90 Foundation and Society Members only
Includes dinner and drinks
RSVP bookings and payment: call 02 4926 2867

Enjoy a festive three course dinner in the Gallery.

 

ARTBURST / BUDBURST
Friday 9 January 2015
6.00pm - 8.00pm
RSVP essential: 02 4974 5123

Hunter vignerons talk about the art of wine, with the backdrop of the exhibitions: Kilgour Prize 2014 and Beards, Mo's & Bro's

 

SIX SUMMER FLICKS 2015
13 January to 22 January 2015 – 6.30pm. Tower Cinemas Newcastle.
Ticket sales commence at the end of November, available at Tower Cinemas only. 

Still Life (M) Tuesday 13 January
Ilo Ilo (M) Wednesday 14 January
Populaire (M) Thursday 15 January
In Bloom (M) Tuesday 20 January
Tim’s Vermeer (M)Wednesday 21 January
Living is Easy With Eyes Closed (M)Thursday 22 January 


For more information

Society inquiry line:
02 4974 5123
Email:
gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au
Mail:
PO Box 1727
Newcastle NSW 2300
Bookings are essential for all events. All cheques made payable to Newcastle Art Gallery Society.

 



2014 Art Gallery Society Committee

President: Prue Viggers
Vice President: Helen De Bruyn
Secretary/Public Officer: Gael Davies
Treasurer: John Turnbull
Membership Secretary: Helen Dark
Committee: Carolanne Clement, Peter Frost, Jan Hills, Anne Pell and Jeanette Stokes




Introduction

Newcastle Art Gallery is funded and administered by The City of Newcastle with support from the NSW State Government through ArtsNSW. Funds are also generated from the corporate sector, the community and the Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation. The Art Gallery Society and volunteer guides support many of the Gallery's activities.

 




Shop

Priding itself on a unique range of hand crafted jewellery, ceramics, art books, cards and design objects, the Newcastle Art Gallery shop always has something different in store. The shop has a specific focus on local artisans whilst also reflecting the Gallery's exciting exhibition program.

Newcastle Art Gallery Society members receive a 10% discount on all purchases from the Gallery Shop.

 







ABSURDIA: Noel McKenna - A focus

23 August - 16 November 2014

Careful additions to the Newcastle Art Gallery collection over years and decades allows the collection to build a narrative of an artist’s oeuvre. Continuing our series of focus exhibitions on key artists in the collection, Absurdia features Sydney based artist Noel McKenna. His diverse and quirky depictions of life and the somewhat peculiar aspects of the everyday are key attractions in his works that span sculpture, paintings and ceramics. McKenna’s tongue in cheek view of the world offers an absurdist look at serious issues such as mining and the art ‘scene’ itself.




AFTER FIVE: Fashion from the Darnell Collection

14 September – 10 November 2013

AFTER FIVE Fashion from the Darnell Collection is a major exhibition of fashion presenting over thirty garments and accessories from around the world by iconic designers including Christian Dior, Mary Quant, Oscar de la Renta, Bruce Oldfield, Adolpho, Emilio Pucci, Emanuel Ungaro, Christopher Essex, and Franco Moschino.

The exhibition is drawn from The Darnell Collection of International Vintage Couture. Now considered Australia’s largest private collection of fashion, the collection has an intriguing provenance. The core of the collection was put together by Doris Darnell, a Quaker from Pennsylvania, who from the 1930s gathered together items of clothing worn by her wealthy friends and acquaintances. The glamorous garments worn for special occasions were of particular interest.

In 2004 Doris bequeathed half her collection to an American university, and the other half to her goddaughter, Charlotte Smith. Since inheriting the collection, Charlotte has continued to develop and refine her holdings, which now numbers over 6000 items. New acquisitions by Charlotte have resulted in many of the works bearing an Australian provenance.

With gowns by some of the greatest names in fashion, as well as some talented but little-known designers, the exhibition illustrates stylistic moments in fashion, and explores how and why evening wear has changed for women over the years.

Commencing in the 1920s and spanning the decades up to the 1990s, the exhibition presents garments originally worn to cocktail soirees, balls, opening nights at the theatre, charity events, graduation parties and red carpet galas, and for dancing at nightclubs and discotheques.

First shown at Hazelhurst Regional Gallery & Arts Centre in early 2013, Newcastle Art Gallery has worked with Charlotte Smith to expand the range of material on display and curate a new exhibition experience just for Hunter audiences.

General admission: $8
Members/concession: $5
Children under 12 and pre-booked education groups are free.

Free entry for new Society Members.
Join the Gallery Society and receive free entry to the exhibition.

Fascinator Fridays
Wear a hair fascinator on Fridays to gain free entry to the exhibition.

A Hazelhurst Regional Gallery and Arts Centre touring exhibition made possible through the assistance of Charlotte Smith of the Darnell Collection.

 


Instagram competition
Visit the exhibition, strike a pose in front of our magazine cover and post it to Instagram to win great prizes.


GUIDED TOURS
For all members of the public
Every Saturday and Sunday
11.00am – 12.00pm

Free with exhibition entry. Meet at the Gallery front desk.


TEACHERS’ PREVIEW
Information session with Charlotte Smith, Curator and owner, Darnell Collection
Thursday 12 September
5.30pm – 7.00pm

Join Charlotte Smith and Audience Programs staff at this special preview event only for teachers. Enjoy refreshments, gather suggestions and free resources, and enjoy time out with colleagues.
Free, bookings required on 4974 5100

TORCHLIGHT TOUR
For children & their families
Saturday 21 September
6.00pm – 7.30pm

Enjoy the Darnell Collection after five! Children’s artmaking, snacks and guided tours by torchlight. A great way for families to receive free access to the exhibition. A range of glow in the dark items and torches will be available for purchase.
Free family event. Bookings required on 4974 5100

SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS, week 1
For children 5-8 years old
10.30am – 12.30pm

For children 8-12 years old
2.30pm – 4.30pm

Tuesday 24, Wednesday 25, & Thursday 26 September
Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by After Five. Younger children will make brooches and older children bags, using a selection of vintage inspired materials.
$15. Includes exhibition entry and all materials
Bookings and payment required. Call 4974 5100


FROCK CONVERSATIONS
A four-part series of perspectives

Tuesday evenings
6.00pm – 7.30pm
$15 per talk, $50 for the series
Includes exhibition entry and refreshments. Bookings and payment required.

8 October - Kristin Todd, Westfield Kotara Personal Stylist
Kristin Todd has for almost a decade, dressed celebrity chefs, sports stars and every day people. Kristin will draw connections between the exhibition and current trends; divulging key styling tips.
15 October - Margot Riley, Dress Historian & Specialist
Librarian Margot Riley will respond to the exhibition by speaking about the way that historical events have shaped fashion trends through the decades.
22 October - Lady Melbourne
Fashion blogger Lady Melbourne is one of Australia’s key fashion bloggers. In this talk she describes her experience with the Darnell Collection and how to mix vintage finds with contemporary fashion.
29 October - Lindie Ward, Powerhouse Museum curator and founder of Museum Mannequins
Lindie Ward specialises in textiles, lace, dresses and shoes. Lindie speaks about the Australian Dress Register – a national online register of garments.

 

VINTAGE CLOTHING APPRAISAL DAY
Presented by Lorraine Foster of The Vintage Clothing Shop
Wednesday 16 October
All day from 10.00am, 15 minute consultations

Curious about one of your vintage treasures? Join Lorraine Foster and potentially reveal a rare find within your own wardrobe.
Free, bookings required. Call 4957 5100


COFFEE WITH ART
Wednesday 2 October
10.30am – 12.00 noon

Charlotte Smith, owner and curator of the Darnell Collection tells the stories of key garments, as well as the Collection’s intriguing provenance.
$15 / $10 members
Payable at the door, Bookings required
Call 4974 5123 or gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au


COUTURE STYLES
Hair styling competition inspired by the decades
Sunday 6 October
2.00pm – 5.00pm

Come and see the entrants and judging of Newcastle Art Gallery’s Couture Styles competition, where stylists from salons across the region create amazing hairstyles
inspired by pieces in the Darnell Collection.
Free with exhibition entry


FRIDAY AFTER FIVE
Featuring jazz performance in the gallery, and a range of events along Darby Street
Friday 11 October
5.30pm – 8.00pm

Visit the Gallery after five to celebrate the launch of Friday night trading along Darby street. Continue for a stroll down Darby Street to peruse the latest fashion
trends, and join in a range of events along Newcastle’s fashion street.
Free with exhibition entry


TODDLER PLAY DAY
Whats in the dress up box?
9.30am – 11.00am
Monday 14 October

Enjoy a family friendly atmosphere, with exhibition inspired dress ups, art activities, singing and stories followed by a morning snack.
$5. Includes exhibition entry, all materials and morning tea
Bookings and payment required. Call 4974 5100


MELBOURNE CUP CELEBRATION
Fashions on the Green - Live with 1233 ABC Newcastle

Tuesday 5 November
12 noon – 4.00pm
Join 1233 ABC Afternoons presenter Carol Duncan and enjoy an elegant Melbourne Cup affair on the Laman St green under the marquee, live on radio. Follow the
race on the big screen, with prizes to be won for best in show.
$55/ $50 members.
Places are limited. Bookings and payment required. Call 4974 5100


GLAMARAMA WRAP PARTY
with the ever-fabulous Bob Downe
Saturday 9 November
6.00pm – 8:30pm

Visit the exhibition in its final week for a fantastic wrap party full of music, drinks and fabulous entertainment. Pick your favourite era and come dressed to the nines! Enjoy classic
musical hits as we roll through the decades, with gift bags and treats for the best dressed from each era.
$55 / $50 members, includes exhibition entry, drinks and canapés
Bookings and payment required, call 4974 5100


FRENCH & JAZZ PIANO
Live performances
Sundays during the exhibition
13 October, 20 October,
3 November & 10 November
3.00pm – 4.00pm

Enjoy french classics from the 1920s and 30s and fantastic jazz, played on the Gallery’s newly acquired Stuart & Sons piano with accompaniments.
Free


LEARNING
School groups who pre-book a Guided tour receive free entry
Our tours are presented by trained Guides and include a range of tactile resources. Call 4974 5112.


Kid's art activity with paper dolls

Visit with your children and pick up a free copy of this very special activity. Find out more about our SMART SPACE activities.


TAKE IT HOME

After Five Fashion from the Darnell Collection catalogue – $10.00




TO THE EDGE: Abstracting art in Australia

10 August – 20 October 2013

TO THE EDGE examines hard edge abstraction by artists who experimented with the idea of non-objective art and colour field painting in the 1960s and 70s.

During the sixties, the world began looking to America rather than Europe for a new interpretation of Modernism. Artists such as Clement Meadmore, who played a significant role, sought to create a contemporary identity in Australia that was aligned with these late Modernist ideas emerging overseas.

Artists featured alongside the recent sculpture acquisition, Hereabout 1971/2001 by Clement Meadmore include Peter Booth, Col Jordan, Ron Robertson-Swann and Janet Dawson. These artists were exhibited in the National Gallery of Victoria’s landmark 1968 exhibition The Field, which heralded a new generation rejecting the mainstream idea of an Australian art seemingly preoccupied with colonial motifs of the bush and the landscape.


SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS, week 2
For children 5-8 years old
10.30am – 12.30pm
For children 8-12 years old
2.30pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday 1, Wednesday 2 & Thursday 3 October

Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by TO THE EDGE. Children will explore hard edge abstraction by creating works of art on canvas with bold, brash colours.
$15. Includes exhibition entry and materials
Bookings and payment required. Call 4974 5100


EYE SPY TOURS
Guided tours for children 0-5 yrs

For more information, see the tours and teachers' page of the website.




Michael Cook

Civilised #11 2012

They are human creatures, the work of the same omnipotent author, equally under his care with the most polished European; perhaps being less offensive, more entitled to his favour.”
Lieutenant James Cook (b.1728–d.1779) British explorer, navigator and cartographer who first visited Australia in 1770 on H.M. Barque Endeavour

 

Fashion photographer turned visual artist Michael Cook like most of us, was taught a limited Australian history at school from a European perspective and not the Aboriginal history of his ancestors. The unsettling terms that remain with him and inform his practice are, ‘the discovery of Australia’ and describing people as ‘natives’.  Cook’s practice re-imagines history creating alternate worlds with a modern dreaming.

Civilised is a series of fourteen digital printsfrom 2012 and looks at four European countries that visited Australia before and during colonisation: The Netherlands, Spain, England and France. Cook was inspired to create this body of work after discovering quotes from the journals of early explorers describing the Aboriginal people they encountered, clearly highlighting their ignorance of the existing culture. Unlike Captain James Cook whose comments were more sympathetic.

The artist imagines individual scenes of the first encounter. With our land girt by sea, he is restricted to a beach location. The composition is repeated in each image keeping the horizon line consistent and balancing the solitary Aboriginal figure to a similar mid point. The background landscape is kept too hazy for any further clues on how the characters may have arrived therefore all the visual clues are to be gleaned from the text and the Aboriginal models in the frame.

The recent acquisition Civilised #11 depicts an Aboriginal man dressed in colonial undergarments, wearing a military hat and holding the British flag. As with the other works in the series, a narrative begins in the top corner of each work. Civilised #11 reads:

“The inhabitants of this country are the miserablest people in the world...
They are tall, straight-bodied, and thin, with small long limbs.
They have great heads, round foreheads, and great brows…”
1

Cook is gently encouraging us to question what it means to be civilised by assessing the model’s attire, props and expressions. Is it ascertained through fashion, one’s speech and mannerisms, the ability to cultivate the land, Christian beliefs or the colour of skin? If Aboriginal people had been deemed to be civilised by European explorers, would their experience have been different?

Diarne Wiercinski
Assistant Curator
Exhibitions and Collection

 

1. William Dampier (1651–1715) an English buccaneer  who first visited eastern Australia in 1688  on the pivateer Cygnet





Liam Power

Land Bulk Study No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, &9 2013

Works by Hunter artist Liam Power, from his 2013 exhibition Land Bulk at the John Paynter Gallery have recently been acquired for the collection. Power's totemic images from Land Bulk are a testament to the artist's unique vision. Using the visual devices of repetition, bold shape, colour and texture the artist has created a commanding body of work. The abstracted images in the series are like prized trophies, totems to a golden age, yet textured and weathered hinting at the underlying ambivalence of industry and its environmental impact in this region.

Power's images capture the staccato of bulk carriers marking the horizon line of the city of Newcastle. Like a visual interruption to the edge of the universe or a reassuring image of place, the movement of ships, in particular bulk carriers are representative of coal and synonymous with Newcastle. Power works en plein air sketching and developing his images exploring what he describes as the 'contradictory forms present within the landscape'. The works are thus ambiguous, open ended with paint applied in thick impasto.

The nine workson paper, acquired by the Gallery offerviewers the opportunity to see how repetition produces an arresting visual device- where together the work creates a vibrant and compelling installation. The colours in his large oil painting are evocative of the colours ofthe Aboriginal Flag, perhaps referencing the Indigenous presence in a post colonial context and an inclusive contemporary landscape tradition.

Liam Power, born 1988, is a local artist based in Port Stephens. In 2009 he won the inaugural Ford Grant, sponsored by Helen & Christopher Ford to support artists in the development of a body of work for exhibition at Newcastle Art School and Damien Minton Gallery in Sydney. Since then he has graduated from the University of Newcastle and participated in exhibitions from Sydney to Perth. This acquisition represents an opportunity for the Newcastle Art Gallery to support the work of local, living artists, whose ongoing career will be ‘one to watch’.

Madeleine Kelman Snow
Art History Department Newcastle Art School
Member, Newcastle Art Gallery Acquisitions’ Committee


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol. 44, number 2
July 2013 - January 2014




Freddie Ngarrmaliny Timms

Fish hole - Bow River Station2003

Freddie Ngarrmaliny Timms was born in 1946 at the place he was named after Ngarrmaliny,Police Hole,near Foal Creek on Bedford Downs south west of Warmun, Western Australia.  

After a career as a stockman, Timms began painting in his forties. His career as an artist is unusual, breaking away from the experience of other Indigenous artists. In 1996 he began exhibiting at the Frank Watters Gallery, Sydney on equal terms with non-Indigenous artists.

He knew Kimberley artist Rover Thomas and his style is similar to that of Thomas but recognisably his own. Timms set up a corporation, Jirrawun Aboriginal Art Corporation to market work on a consignment basis for an increasingly wide range of Kimberley artists.

Timms’ paintings are like aerial maps of the bones of the country where he lived and worked all his life. He says, “I think about the country where I was walking and camping, all the main water holes, all the camping areas, I remember the places where I used to go mustering and follow them up in my painting.”

Gallery benefactors, the late Dr Colin Laverty and his wife Liz were avid collectors of Indigenous works. Fish hole – Bow River Station was purchased from the recent Laverty auction, and it seems fitting that it has found a new home in the Newcastle collection.

As a Gallery Guide, I have been enthused about contemporary Indigenous art since my initial training when I researched an Indigenous work for a presentation to fellow Guides.  This work is exceptional because it sings - the colours, the line and the form create a painting that works on many levels. I can appreciate it for the sheer joy of the effect on the senses, yet on another level, appreciate that this is a work that also depicts country and has meaning for the Gidja people of the Kimberley.

Val Rutherford
Gallery Guide


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol. 44, number 2
July 2013 - January 2014




WHITELEY ON WATER

2 November 2013– 23 February 2014

‘…if there is such thing as reincarnation …I would love to come back as a bower bird’
Brett Whiteley 1985

Newcastle Art Gallery purchased Autumn abstract in 1959 from the Italian Scholarship exhibition at Komon Art Gallery, Sydney. This was the first work of art by Brett Whiteley to enter a public collection in the world. He was 20 years old.

In 1977, Summer at Carcoar was heralded as a symbol of cultural progress for Newcastle when it was commissioned as part of the launch of the new Art Gallery building opened by Queen Elizabeth II. Now in 2013, Wendy Whiteley has donated to the collection Black totem II 1993 in memory of Brett and Wendy’s daughter Arkie, making a significant contribution to both the Art Gallery and the city of Newcastle.

To celebrate the acquisition of this major work of art, Newcastle Art Gallery is proud to present Whiteley on water an exhibition in association with the Brett Whiteley Studio and the Art Gallery of NSW which has been drawn from their respective collections.

The idea of ‘on water’ binds together Whiteley’s iconic interpretations of Australian life by the sea with his revered status as one of Australia’s greatest artists of the 20th Century. A celebration of our nation’s ‘cult of the coastal life style’ from Byron to Bondi, the exhibition includes the unfinished beach polyptych which had never left the studio until its recent display at Hazelhurst Regional Gallery and Arts Centre as part of the original iteration of this exhibition in 2012. It represents Whiteley’s ambition and commitment to the Australian landscape.

Sun, bodies and beauty are all represented with an underlying element of danger – much like the idea of the Australian coast. Whiteley consistently highlighted this tension found in nature throughout his practice with fibreglass sharks diving upwards and eggs balancing precariously atop vertical growing plinths. His beloved Lavender Bay is also depicted with such intense and prolonged observation, the subject of some of his most successful works.

Presented in association with the Brett Whiteley Studio and the Art Gallery of New South Wales

     Brett-Whiteley-LOGO-web  AGNSW logo


SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS
For children 5-8 years old
10.30am – 12.30pm
For children 8-12 years old
2.30pm – 4.30pm

Week 1: Tuesday 14, Wednesday 15, & Thursday 16 January
Week 2: Tuesday 21, Wednesday 22, & Thursday 23 January

Join Gallery educators in week one for workshops inspired by the exhibition, focusing on sculpture.
In week two workshops will be based on ideas around the beach and summer.
$15 per child. Includes exhibition entry and materials
Bookings and payment required, Call 4974 5100


KIDS’ ART TRAIL

Visit with your children and pick up a free copy at the front desk.


EYE SPY TOURS
Guided tours for children 0-5 yrs
For more information, see the tours and teachers page of the website.




OLLEY-ALIA

23 November 2013 – 2 February 2014

A focus exhibition that brings to life the art practice of the late Margaret Olley. Olley was a frequent visitor to Newcastle and supporter of the Gallery, and the Gallery boasts an important collection of her works.

Newcastle Art Gallery recently acquired some key ephemera from Olley’s estate that include artist palettes, paints and brushes.

Situated alongside key works from the collection, these objects bring the idea of the artist’s studio to life and the key ‘ingredients’ that went into creating some of Olley’s most important works of art.


ABOUT OLLEY
Edmund Capon AO OBE speaks
Sunday 2 February 2014
2.00pm – 3.00pm
Join art scholar and former Director of the Art Gallery of NSW, Edmund Capon AO OBE, as he shares recollections about times with Olley, her house and her practice. A rare insight into one of Australia’s most loved artists, by one of Australia’s most well known art figures.
Free, bookings required. Call 4974 5100


STILL LIFE DRAWING MASTERCLASS
Inspired by Olley
Saturday 18 January 2013
2.00pm – 4.00pm

Join us for this special drawing class, working from a domestic still life arrangement.
$30 per person, afternoon tea and materials provided
Bookings and payment required Call 4974 5100




BLUE+WHITE

15 February - 11 May 2014

BLUE+WHITE presents early Chinese and Japanese ceramics alongside recent works that explore this colour relationship. This distinct exhibition explores the attraction of ceramicists, artists, printmakers and painters to the much loved blue and white ceramic tradition of the ‘Willow pattern’.

Featured are Australian artists such as Gerry Wedd, Danie Mellor, Laith McGregor and Lucas Grogan who use these colours and similar motifs in their work as comment on colonialism, personal identity and socio–political issues.

SPECIAL PROJECT
BLUE+WHITE Mural

Big Blue by Lucas Grogan
Former Novocastrian now Melbourne based artist Lucas Grogan has created a 40m wide mural on the Gallery’s Darby Street side.



TEA HOUSE TASTING
Presented by Madame Mo’s Dumpling House
Friday 21 March (Harmony Day)
6.00pm – 8.00pm

$20 per person
Limited spaces available
Bookings and payment required
Call 4974 5100
To compliment tea set pieces on display in BLUE+WHITE, visit the Gallery for an authentic tea house experience. Tour the exhibition with Curator Sarah Johnson, and learn the story of tea, its history, rituals and nurturing aspects.
Enjoy samples of juicy, locally produced dumplings, accompanied by hand rolled tea buds and blooming flower teas.


EXQUISITE
Music inspired by the Orient
Sunday 30 March & 6 April
3.00pm – 4.00pm

Free, bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Featuring David Banney and Sandra Fitzgerald on violin, and Erin Sweetman on piano.


TODDLER PLAY DAY
Explore Blue!
Celebrating National Play Group week
Monday 24 March
9.30am – 11.00am

$5. Includes all materials and morning tea
Bookings and payment required
Call 4974 5100
Enjoy a family friendly atmosphere, with exhibition inspired games, art activities, singing and stories followed by a morning snack. Please come dressed in blue to fit in with our blue theme.


TORCHLIGHT TOUR
For children & their families
Saturday 12 April
6.00pm – 7.30pm

Free, bookings required
Call 4974 51000
Children’s art making, snacks and guided tours by torchlight. This Torchlight tour we will tell the ancient story of the most popular ceramic design ever produced; the Willow pattern. Grab some popcorn and juice before watching the performance, followed by an exhibition tour and art making. A range of glow in the dark items will be available for purchase.


SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS
For children 5 – 8 years old
10.30am – 12.30pm
For children 8 – 12 years old
2.30pm – 4.30pm
Tue 22, Wed 23 & Thu 24 April
$15 per child. Includes all materials
Bookings and payment required
Call 4974 5100
Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by BLUE+WHITE. Children will decorate ceramics and use mosaic and drawing to create a series of blue and white works of art.
Go to the Peter Maloney exhibition page for more school holiday workshops.


CERAMIC PATTERN CLASS
In collaboration with Newcastle Studio Potters and Back to Back Galleries
Saturday 10 May
1.30pm – 4.30pm
$60 per person, afternoon tea and materials provided
Bookings and payment required
Call 4974 5100
Guided by expert ceramicists, participants will use a range of blue underglazes to apply their own designs to already bisque-fired ramekins (four ramekins per person). Fired and completed ramekins can be picked up from Back to Back Galleries at a later date.




FULLY FIGURATIVE

15 February - 11 May 2014

The representation of the body is a perennial subject matter across time, practice and medium. Featuring diverse works including sculpture by George Baldessin, works on paper by Mike Parr, photography by Fiona Hall and paintings by Jon Molvig, the works of art in this exhibition respond to our endless fascination with the body.



LIFE DRAWING
Three–part introductory series of casual drawing classes
Tuesday 11, 18 & 25 March
5.30pm – 7.30pm
$20 per class, $50 for all 3 classes
Includes wine, light finger food and all drawing materials
Bookings and payment required
Call 4974 5100
Amongst the exhibition, Jade Hull, Audience Programs Officer will demonstrate life drawing techniques and help participants extend their skills, featuring a different nude model each week.


GROTESQUE THOUGHTS
Artist masterclass with Novocastrian artist Peter Gardiner
Saturday 29 March
10.30am – 4.00pm

$50 per person, afternoon tea and all materials provided
Bookings and payment required
Call 4974 5100
Participants will learn the process of revealing a figure or face from pigment splatters on ceramic plates in this almost Rorschach inspired workshop.


This exhibition is the focus of our free Eye Spy Guided Tour program for children aged 0 – 5. Visit the Tours and Teachers page for information.




Numskull Mural

Presented in conjunction with Look Hear 2013

Numskull is an Australian, Sydney-based artist. He works across a variety of mediums including painting, sculpture, illustration and outdoor murals. He has shown in galleries, painted walls and sold paintings throughout the world in such places as London, New York, Tokyo, Paris, Singapore, Amsterdam, Hong Kong and all over Australia.

In conjunction with Look Hear 2013, the Gallery is commissioning a mural project on the hoarding currently on the Darby Street side of the Gallery.
Installation: 23 - 24 November 2013

Look hear launch
Hit the Bricks Festival
Friday 22 November
6.00pm - 8.30pm
Free, bookings required

Mural Artcart
For children of all ages
23 - 24 November (if good weather)
Extended hours: 10.30am – 1.30pm
Visit for this special art cart inspired by the work of Numskull, to be held on the corner of Laman and Darby St, while the mural is installed.
Free. Children must be accompanied by an adult

Artist talk
For senior school students
Monday 25 November
10.30am - 11.30am

Bring your students to join an artist talk with Numskull, where he will explain to students his experiences in the art world and processes as an artist.
Free (yr 10, 11 & 12 students only)
Bookings required, 4974 5100




BILL HENSON ACROSS TIME
Curated by Bill Henson

23 November 2013 – 2 February 2014

Across time focuses on the Gallery’s expanding collection of works by Bill Henson, one of Australia’s most significant contemporary artists.

The works in the Newcastle collection document aspects of Henson’s career from the seminal Paris Opera series through to his iconic youth-focused works and to later works documenting the abandoned landscape, sky-scapes and shipping.

This selection of works offers haunting and otherworldly depictions of the otherwise overlooked or banal scenarios of our everyday life.


COFFEE WITH ART
Wednesday 6 November
10.30am – 12.00 noon

Tristan Sharp Assistant Director Newcastle Art Gallery, exposes the photographic art of Bill Henson.
$15 / $10 members
Payable at the door, bookings required 4974 5123


ARTIST TALK
For senior students
Friday 6 December
10.30am – 12.00 noon

Reserve places for your students now, for this once in a lifetime chance to pose questions to one of Australia’s most recognisable artists.
Free (year 11 & 12 students only)
Bookings required 4974 5100


IN CONVERSATION
Bill Henson with Tristan Sharp
Saturday 7 December
2.00pm – 3.00pm

Bill Henson and Tristan Sharp discuss the progression of Henson’s work over time, in the context of key works from the collection.
Free, bookings required. Call 4974 5100


TAKE IT HOME

Pick up a free copy of the exhibition brochure when you visit.




DAVID ASPDEN SURVEY

23 November 2013 – 2 February 2014

David Aspden (1935 – 2005), was one of Australia’s foremost abstract painters. His use of glowing colour and gestural brush strokes evoke the energy and rhythm of Jazz music.

This major survey exhibition brings together works that explore the artist’s three loves: colour, landscape and music, and includes key works from the Newcastle collection.

A Bathurst Regional Art Gallery exhibition


IN CONVERSATION
Richard Perram, Director Bathurst Regional Art Gallery with Karen Aspden
Saturday 23 November
2.00pm – 3.00pm

Richard Perram visits Newcastle Art Gallery to present a talk with Karen Aspden, wife of the late David Aspden. Together, they provide insights into the exhibition, and into David and his artistic practice.
Free, bookings required
Call 4974 5100


SUNDAY JAZZ
Free live jazz performances
Sundays until Christmas
24 November, 1 December, 8
December, 15 December &
22 December
3.00pm – 4.00pm
The Sunday Jazz series is inspired by bebop and cool jazz composers including Miles Davis, John Coltraine and Charlie Parker. Aspden often painted while he listened to these composers. An indication of his interest in Jazz is demonstrated in many of the names of the works included in this exhibition; including Jazz Festival Flag 1968, Jazz 1967, and One for Miles (A Musical Portrait for Miles Davis) 2002.
Free


TAKE IT HOME

David Aspden Survey exhibition catalogue - $10.00




Tjungkara KEN

Ngayuku Ngura (My Country) 2010

In 2011 the Laverty 2 exhibition was presented at the Gallery and as with the previous exhibition Laverty Indigenous exhibition it was educative and inspirational for visitors and Gallery staff. Colin and Liz Laverty had once again opened up their collection to the Gallery but unlike the first exhibition that focussed solely on Indigenous work, Laverty 2 had Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists presented together as contemporary Australian artists. Of course this was a key message the Laverty’s had continually championed and this exhibition made it clear.

I remember Laverty 2 being not only a ‘milestone’ for this Gallery but also for myself. There were many personal revelations in coming to understand important Indigenous artists, but also discovering many for the first time. One such artist who left an indelible impact was Tjungkara Ken.

Her work Ngayuku Ngura (My Country) 2010, with searing red and orange colliding into cool absorbing greens in Laverty 2 was placed on a deep green wall. I kept thinking that these colours shouldn’t work, but they did, powerfully, and all underpinned by the exquisite detail of the work, the fine application of paint, the dot by dot structure building a highly energetic composition. The painting depicts country – ngayuku ngura (my country) her Rocket Bore homeland, in which mountain ranges, rock holes, creeks and other features of the land are represented in vibrant colour, the different colours and designs representing variations in the landscape.

Born in 1969, Tjungkara Ken is one of nine children to artists Mick Wikilyiri and Paniny Mick. She and many of her extended family live at Rocket Bore, their homeland on the Northern Territory/South Australian border. She began to paint in 1997 and in recent years has increased her painting output gaining wide recognition.

Beyond her own work, she has also painted collaborative works with family members under the name of the Rocket Bore Mob.

In April this year, two years after the Laverty 2 exhibition, Ngayuku Ngura (My Country) was purchased from the Laverty auction in Sydney. Bidding on this work was a thrill but securing it for the collection even more so. With the help of benefactors Bill and Megan Williamson and Newcastle Art Gallery Society, this is the first work by the artist to enter the Gallery’s growing collection of Indigenous contemporary works. Its addition to the collection also reinforces the lasting legacy of Colin and Liz Laverty to the Gallery.

Tristan Sharp
Assistant Director


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol. 44, number 2
July 2013 - January 2014




Rosalie Gascoigne

Flora Galop 1976

Flora Galop 1976 captures Rosalie Gascoigne’s dialogue between the nuanced histories of found, weathered objects, and the classical languages andpoetry of the artist’s studies.While composed by the unknown stories of its individual parts, the construction of ceramic, paper, wood and metal resolves each mixed media element into one expression. This expression is the romantic pastoral image of Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers and the season of spring.

Flora stands alone, poised,laced at head and hand with bouquets, illuminated by each individual chip of ceramic, which surrounds her image, pulling her into the foreground. The image of Flora is a hand coloured engraving taken from a book of 19th century music which the artist once found in a dump site, and later gifted to fellow artist James Gleeson, as recalled by art historian Mary Eagle.

Memorialised in the weathered timber cabinet with a hinged door barely concealing its interior, but creating a sculptural counter for her image to be centred in the composition, Flora is suspended in her surrounding which is industrial and yet childlike - akin to the old fold out school desks which hid all manner of secrets and scribbles.

Flora Galop was originally exhibited in the artist’s 1976 exhibition ‘Rosalie Gascoigne – Assemblage’ at Gallery A in Sydney. The show was the result of South Coast artist Michael Taylor including Gascoigne in an ‘artist’s choice’ group exhibition of new talent at Gallery A earlier in the same year. Only a few days after the opening, Gascoigne received a letter from Gallery A remarking upon the success of the works displayed and inviting her to do a solo exhibition that September. Gascoigne, exhibiting her work for the first time at the age of 57, accepted the invitation. The following year Flora Galop was shown in a group exhibition titled Object at Ray Hughes’ Gallery in Brisbane, after which it was held in Hughes’ collection, and acquired by Liz & Colin Laverty in December 1987.

Gascoigne had burst into the Australian art world, with her work being acquired into museum collections and a survey exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) held in 1978; another at the National Gallery of Art in Wellington, New Zealand in 1981; inclusion in the Sydney Biennale in 1979 and the representation of Australia at the Venice Biennale alongside artist Peter Booth in 1982.

Flora Galop was later exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art in its 1998 exhibition The Laverty Collection,as well as the first major survey exhibition of the artist’s work Rosalie Gascoigne at the NGV in 2008 – 2009.

“This is a work which Colin and I have enjoyed always, as with Side show parrots 1981which was shown at the Venice Biennale in 1982. I am sad to see Flora go, but so thrilled she has found a new home in Newcastle and that I will be able to see her there often.” Liz Laverty, 2013

Eleanor Cheetham
Laverty Collection


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol. 44, number 2
July 2013 - January 2014







THE POWER OF LANDSCAPE From the collection

8 June  - 4 August 2013

Landscape painting has been an enduring part of Australian art history. In the canon of western art, landscape painting has many roles; it can be linked with the incursion of colonial powers onto a new landscape and taking possession of the land; it can be the backdrop upon which mythical stories are played out; and it can simply be the stage for observed changes of nature and light. As a means to define territory and ownership, landscape painting in the early years of Australian settlement was often an attempt to make sense of the uncontrollable and indefinable. Alternatively Indigenous Australian art making has long sought to depict landscape in terms of significant dreaming stories and connection to country.

These works from the collection traverse time and culture, incorporating 19th century works from colonial and post-colonial artists such as Joseph Lycett, John Glover, Eugene von Guérard and James Carse. A modern work by Mandy Martin from 1988 continues the tradition of landscape painting, with a grand illusory depiction of a non specific location with aspects of Turner-esque tone, colour and the transparency of light. Also included are early painted boards from Papunya near Alice Springs, an important part of the story of Australian art and the emergence of the Western desert art movement of the 1970s.

Interestingly, these works display a continuity in their representation of land and water. Von Guerard’s Lake Gnotuk, near Camperdown depicts two distinct lakes near Camperdown in Victoria, whilst Joseph Lycett’s almost topographical reading of early Newcastle clearly defines the landmarks between the growing colony of Newcastle, the ocean and Hunter River. Charlie Tawara Tjungarrayi and Mick Namarari Tjapaltjarri’s Nyinga Dreaming and Travelling story on the sandhills, depict significant land formations, campsites, waterholes and dreaming stories associated with Pintupi culture and land in the Northern Territory whilst Lloyd Rees’ ethereal landscape shows the Derwent River and distant shadow of Mt Wellington in Tasmania.  Whilst Philip Wolfhagen references the sky and clouds in his paintings, Gulumbu Yunupingu’s totem and interest are the constellations in the sky.

In conjunction with Illumination The art of Philip Wolfhagen, on display upstairs, this exhibition focuses on the breadth of Australian landscape painting across time of which Tasmanian artist Philip Wolfhagen is an important part. This exhibition not only reinforces the enduring allure of landscape painting in the 21st century but also the ongoing strength and diversity of the Newcastle Art Gallery collection.


NAIDOC week event
Wednesday 10 July
10.30am - 12.30pm
Children and their families are invited to join Aboriginal Youth Officer Ray Kelly, for an Australian morning tea followed by a performance showcasing dance, traditional objects and dreamtime stories.
Free. To book call 4974 5100.





Wolfhagen from the collection

Wolfhagen's work is held in major public and corporate collections in Australia and in private collections nationally and internationally, with the largest national public collection of his work currently owned by Newcastle Art Gallery. View Philip Wolfhagen's works of art in the Newcastle Art Gallery collection below.


The Newcastle Chest featuring Misplaced endemic 2010, Waiting for the trade winds 2010, Homage to JL 2010

The Newcastle Chest featuring Philip Wolfhagen 2010
The Newcastle Chest
Misplaced endemic
2010
oil and beeswax on Australian red cedar
42.5 x 32 cm x 1.2 cm

Waiting for the trade winds 2010
oil and beeswax on Australian red cedar

41 x 66 x 1.2 cm


Homage to JL
2010
oil and beeswax on Australian red cedar

42.5 x 32 x 1.2 cm

Commissioned by Newcastle Region Art Gallery, purchased with the assistance of James and Judy Hart, Robert and Lindy Henderson, Valerie Ryan, Newcastle Gallery Society and Newcastle Region Art Gallery Foundation 2010

Newcastle
Art Gallery collection

 

Philip Wolfhagen Vanishing point no 1 1995
Vanishing point no 1
1995
oil and beeswax on canvas
143 x 231 cm
Gift of the Newcastle Region Art Gallery Foundation 2010
Newcastle Art Gallery collection



View to the past
2010
oil and beeswax on linen
200 x 214 cm
Purchased by Newcastle Region Art Gallery Foundation 2011
Newcastle Art Gallery collection


Philip Wolfhagen Study for ‘Shifting light’ 2002
Study for ‘Shifting light’
2002
oil on plywood
3 panels
30 x 37 cm (each), 30 x 112.5 cm (overall)

Purchased 2010
Newcastle Art Gallery collection



Memento I 2010
colour lithograph on paper
30 x 35 cm (image), 38 x 45.5 cm (sheet)
Purchased 2011
Newcastle Art Gallery collection




Memento II
2010
colour lithograph on paper
30 x 35 cm (image), 38 x 45.5 cm (sheet)
Purchased 2011
Newcastle Art Gallery collection



Memento III 2010
colour lithograph on paper
31 x 35 cm (image), 38 x 45.5 cm (sheet)
Purchased 2011
Newcastle Art Gallery collection



Surface tension no 3
1998
oil and beeswax on linen
214 x 136 cm
Purchased 1998
Newcastle Art Gallery collection




























PETER MALONEY: A focus

15 February - 11 May 2014

Peter Maloney has had a long and influential career as an artist and teacher with the Australian National University School of Art. This focus exhibition explores the evolution of Peter Maloney’s practice and his mastery of the paint medium over thirty years from 1979-2012. Maloney’s high keyed works explore a range of processes and movement from gestural to tightly constructed painting techniques.

 

SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS
For children 5 – 8 years old
10.30am – 12.30pm
For children 8 – 12 years old
2.30pm – 4.30pm
Tue 15, Wed 16 & Thu 17 April

$15 per child. Includes all materials
Bookings and payment required
Call 4974 5100
Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by the Peter Maloney: A focus exhibition. Children will make a series of 2D works of art using oil pastels, cutting and collage and marbling techniques.


Go to the BLUE+WHITE exhibition page for more school holiday workshops.




RRAPTURE: JULIE RRAP

8 March - 27 April 2014

A focus on two seminal bodies of work by Julie Rrap from the collection. Featuring works from the Persona and shadow series 1984 and the eleven channel video work Porous bodies 1999 that confirm Rrap’s significance as one of Australia’s most innovative artists exploring the concepts of self–portraiture and the portrayal of the female body.


INTERNATIONAL WOMENS' DAY EVENT
Saturday March 8
2.00pm - 3.00pm

Free, bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Listen to a talk on Julie Rrap in relation to the Rrapture: Julie Rrap exhibition, and Tracey Moffatt and Joan Ross in relation to the NEW TO VIDEO exhibition.










Paris-Belle, 13 years old

"This is an abstract view of my everyday summer life, inspired by Whiteley on Water and his studio wall thoughts."


Brett Whiteley was only seven years old when he won his first art prize. To coincide with the Whiteley on Water exhibition at Newcastle Art Gallery 2 November 2013 - 23 February 2014, children were invited to submit their own works of art to the Gallery. These are a selection of works from those submissions.




Hamish, 8 years old

"The seahorse is having a baby boy seahorse. This is happening at the Great Barrier Reef in some coral."


Brett Whiteley was only seven years old when he won his first art prize. To coincide with the Whiteley on Water exhibition at Newcastle Art Gallery 2 November 2013 - 23 February 2014, children were invited to submit their own works of art to the Gallery. These are a selection of works from those submissions.




Daisy, 10 years old

"We all know that the Change is coming. And no one can stop it. It may come in a tornado. It may come in a rip in time and space? You never know!"


Brett Whiteley was only seven years old when he won his first art prize. To coincide with the Whiteley on Water exhibition at Newcastle Art Gallery 2 November 2013 - 23 February 2014, children were invited to submit their own works of art to the Gallery. These are a selection of works from those submissions.




LEGACY: A tribute to Marea Gazzard & Gwyn Hanssen Pigott

23 August - 15 November 2014

Marea Gazzard AM (1928 – 2013) and Gwyn Hanssen Pigott OAM (1935 – 2013) have both been vital figures in the Australian art scene since the 1950s and 60s, becoming masters of their chosen media.

This exhibition pays homage to Gazzard’s and Hanssen Pigott’s collective talent as artists, with works from the 1960s to present day, including recent works from private collections.




Cam, 13 years old

"People playing in the water at the beach."


Brett Whiteley was only seven years old when he won his first art prize. To coincide with the Whiteley on Water exhibition at Newcastle Art Gallery 2 November 2013 - 23 February 2014, children were invited to submit their own works of art to the Gallery. These are a selection of works from those submissions.




Marshall, 9 years old

"They are surfing at Merewether and having a great time. Mabe a whale comes along, swallows them and they surf back out."


Brett Whiteley was only seven years old when he won his first art prize. To coincide with the Whiteley on Water exhibition at Newcastle Art Gallery 2 November 2013 - 23 February 2014, children were invited to submit their own works of art to the Gallery. These are a selection of works from those submissions.




Toby, 8 years old

"There is a guy having too much fun. There is an oil rig getting oil for our cars."


Brett Whiteley was only seven years old when he won his first art prize. To coincide with the Whiteley on Water exhibition at Newcastle Art Gallery 2 November 2013 - 23 February 2014, children were invited to submit their own works of art to the Gallery. These are a selection of works from those submissions.




Angus, 11 years old

"The waves are getting shallower."

 

Brett Whiteley was only seven years old when he won his first art prize. To coincide with the Whiteley on Water exhibition at Newcastle Art Gallery 2 November 2013 - 23 February 2014, children were invited to submit their own works of art to the Gallery. These are a selection of works from those submissions.




Andrew, 13 years old

"A shark is attacking a swimmer, while 2 people are playing beach volleyball and another is swimming."


Brett Whiteley was only seven years old when he won his first art prize. To coincide with the Whiteley on Water exhibition at Newcastle Art Gallery 2 November 2013 - 23 February 2014, children were invited to submit their own works of art to the Gallery. These are a selection of works from those submissions.




Riley,  9 years old

"A guy is surfing on a surfboard."


Brett Whiteley was only seven years old when he won his first art prize. To coincide with the Whiteley on Water exhibition at Newcastle Art Gallery 2 November 2013 - 23 February 2014, children were invited to submit their own works of art to the Gallery. These are a selection of works from those submissions.




Kirsten Coelho

Bottle and candle holder 2012
Cup with handle 2012

Clay and glazes have often been used to creatively imitate the material properties of other substances, such as leather, metal or stone. English variegated ware of the 18th and 19th centuries aimed to refl ect the swirling surface quality of marble in a similar fashion to the Australian agateware of the 19th century.

Bottle and candle holder 2012 and Cup with handle 2012 are illusory vessels by ceramicist Kirsten Coelho. The works are part of a series based on traditionally functional enamel vessels, echoing the type of basic enamel ware used by settlers and migrants in 19th century Australia.

A matte white glaze covers simple, almost abstract shapes; the rims highlighted with a single brown line. Coelho’s rim lines aren’t precisely fi nished, seeming to celebrate small drips and imperfections.

In Coelho’s work, high fired porcelain (reduction fired to 1280o Celsius) is ironically used to refer to the cheap substitute for fine china, closing a circle of material imitation. These works are obviously contemporary, yet clearly embody the qualities of colonial vessels and domestic objects.

The works complement a bowl, from the same series, donated earlier to the collection. They seem to be particularly well placed in the collection, especially given Coelho’s keen interest in the exploration and reinterpretation of historical Australian objects.

Tobias Spitzer
Gallery Technical Officer

Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 45, Number 1
February - June 2014

1. Kirston Coelho, 'This is paper' n.d., Available online: http://thisispaper.com/Kirsten-Coelho-Selected-Works




NEW ACQUISITIONS 2012 - 2013
Indigenous works from the collection

24 May - 10 August 2014

Newcastle Art Gallery has a significant collection that spans various media including Australian and Japanese ceramics, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture, with a strong and growing presence of traditional and contemporary Indigenous works of art.

This exhibition showcases a selection of acquisitions to the collection over the last two years and features artists of national profile such as Gordon Bennett, Walter Ebatarinja, Sally Gabori, Carol Golding, Kitty Kantilla, Tjungkara Ken, Greeny Purvis, Freddie Timms and Ronnie Tjampitjinpa.

The works on display in this exhibition are a small selection of the large and varied Indigenous collection that Newcastle Art Gallery has been committed to collecting and represent the diversity of Indigenous art forms and practice. This component of the gallery collection has grown exponentially in recent years expanding upon the collection which first represented Indigenous art with the donation of five Arnhem Land barks by renowned collector Dr Stuart Scougall in the 1960s.

The depth and quality of the Newcastle Art Gallery¡'s collection has been primarily the result of generous benefaction over its fifty-seven year history. Individuals from Newcastle and beyond, as well as corporate and local business supporters, and the Gallery¡'s Foundation and Society continue to enrich a collection that is recognised nationally. Coupled with this, has been the generous benefaction of long term donors who have gifted vast works of art from their own collections of Indigenous art to the Gallery.

Works are also purchased through an annual acquisitions allocation provided by The City of Newcastle as well as the Les Renfrew Bequest. New acquisitions are considered by an Acquisitions Committee to ensure that they are of the highest quality and build on the considerable and comprehensive nature of the collection, always conscious of maintaining the long term reputation of both the Gallery and Newcastle as cultural centres of sustained substance. 

 

JULY SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS - WEEK 2
For children under 12 years old
$15 per child, includes all materials
Bookings and payment required
Call 02 4974 5100

Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by works in New Acquisitions 2012 - 2013: Indigenous works from the collection. Children will make Mimih spirit foam puppets.

For children 5 - 8 years old:
10.30am - 12.30pm
Tue 8, Wed 9 & Thu 10 July 2014

For children 8 - 12 years old:
2.30pm - 4.30pm
Tue 8 & Wed 9 July 2014

Sibling friendly, 5 - 12 years old:
2.30pm - 4.30pm
Thu 10 July 2014

 

CELEBRATING NAIDOC
GAMBIRRA: A fusion of progressive roots
Friday 11 July 2014
6.00pm - 7.30pm
Free, bookings required
Call 02 4974 5100

To honour the contribution of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and women who fought in defence of this country, and to mark the end of our NAIDOC week celebrations, hear a personal account of service before enjoying the moving rhythms and powerful, arresting vocals by Yolngu songstress GAMBIRRA.

 

SOCIETY EVENT
Coffee with art
Wednesday 2 July 2014
10.30am - 12.00pm
$15 members, $20 non-members
Payable at the door
Bookings required call 02 4974 5123

The Gallery¡'s recent acquisitions of Indigenous works are under the spotlight.




PAPERWEIGHT

24 May - 10 August 2014

Newcastle Art Gallery has a dynamic and historically significant collection of works on paper including contemporary artists pushing the boundaries of working with paper as both subject and object.

From the sculptural forms of Georgia Russell, to the elegance of Adelaide Ironside's drawing and Thea Proctor's printmaking, this exhibition brings into dialogue a diverse range of artists and their work through one of the most fundamental and important materials in art.

 

JULY SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS - WEEK 1
For children under 12 years old
$15 per child, includes all materials
Bookings and payment required call 02 4974 5100

Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by Paperweight. Children will explore the sculptural possibilities of paper and make hanging chandeliers and structural forms.

For children 5 - 8 years old:
10.30am - 12.30pm,
Tue 1 & Thu 3 July 2014

For children 8 - 12 years old:
2.30pm - 4.30pm,
Tue 1 & Wed 2 July 2014

Sibling friendly, 5 - 12 years old:
2.30pm - 4.30pm, Thu 3 July 2014


SOCIETY EVENT
Coffee with art
Wednesday 4 June 2014
10.30am - 12.00pm
$15 members, $20 non-members
Payable at the door
Bookings required call 02 4974 5123

Paper is the focus when Tegan Anthes, paper and photograph conservator from Preservation Australia, talks about her role in the conservation of works on paper.




PAPER TRAIL Drawings from the collection

14 August - 24 October 2010

Direct, delicate and robust, drawing has lost none of its enchantment over its thousands of years of history. This exhibition includes drawings from the collection by Angus Nivison and Max Linegar and pushes towards new definitions of drawing as seen in the work of Pamela Mei-Leng See.

 

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 24 August
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

 

Children / Young People
School holiday workshops*
10.30am – 12.30pm
Tuesday 5 October to Friday 8 October
Ages 5-8 and ages 9-12
$22

 

Education
General tour available**
Free

 

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am – 12.00pm
Wednesday 6 October
Investigate contemporary drawings from the collection with the artist Angus Nivison.
$10 Members/conc., $15 non-members
RSVP: 02 4974 5123

 

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112







NEW TO VIDEO

8 March - 27 April 2014

NEW TO VIDEO unveils the complexities and subtleties of modern life through the strength and innovation of the moving image.

The works in this exhibition span 2003 – 2010 and offer perspectives on subject matter as diverse as postcolonial representation, abandoned urban spaces, love and relationships.

Showcasing the Gallery’s growing collection of contemporary video works by leading artists, NEW TO VIDEO presents diverse approaches to the medium, by artists including Todd Fuller, Shaun Gladwell, Tracey Moffatt, TV Moore, Joan Ross and Daniel von Sturmer.


VIDEO ANIMATION
A masterclass for students Years 10 – 12 with Todd Fuller
Monday 17 March
1.00pm – 3.30pm

$25 (includes afternoon tea)
Bookings required, limited places available
Call Audience Programs 4974 5112
This workshop requires participants to bring their own digital camera, iPad, Tablet or iPhone. More information at time of booking. Students learn how to develop animations from drawings or collage. Perfect for those interested in the area for major assessments for the HSC BOW. Teachers are encouraged to promote this workshop to students with an interest in this area.


EXHIBITION TALK
with Kit Messham–Muir
Sunday 6 April
2.00pm – 3.00pm

Free, bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Dr Kit Messham–Muir, Senior Lecturer in Art History from The University of Newcastle, will discuss the works on display in the NEW TO VIDEO exhibition, and his book Shaun Gladwell: Double War forthcoming in June 2014.







ELIOTH GRUNER: THE TEXTURE OF LIGHT

26 July – 26 October 

Elioth Gruner (1882 – 1939) was an outstanding painter of the Australian landscape and was awarded the Wynne Prize for landscape painting seven times.

The exhibition will include sixty paintings, from the artist’s impressionist beachscapes and farmland views of the 1910s, to the subtle and distinctive modernist landscapes of his maturity in the 1920s and 1930s.

General admission: $8
Members/concession: $5
Children under 12 and pre-booked education groups are free.

A Canberra Museum and Gallery and Newcastle Art Gallery partnership exhibition

 

TEACHERS' PREVIEW
Info session for educators
Thursday 24 July 2014
5.30pm – 7.00pm
Free, bookings required
Includes refreshments, call 02 4974 5112
Join Audience Program staff and special guest speaker Steven Miller at this special preview event for teachers. Enjoy refreshments, gather free resources, and discuss the exhibition with colleagues. 

ARTISTS GET SOCIAL
Hunter artists' get-together
Monday 25 August 2014
5.30pm – 7.00pm
Free, bookings required
Includes refreshments, call 02 4974 5100
Artists, art educators tertiary students and collectors are invited to join Gallery staff for this regular networking event. Enjoy an informal viewing of the exhibition, followed by refreshments.

CAPTURING LIGHT
Artist masterclass with Novocastrian artist Rachel Milne
Saturday 30 August 2014
11.00am – 2.00pm
$55 per person, bookings required
Most materials & lunch provided, students must bring their own primed canvas
More information at time of booking,
call 02 4974 5100
In this Gruner inspired workshop, Rachel will explain the basics of colour and tone, first leading participants through a study painting focusing on cool colours in shade and warm in light. After lunch, the group will briefly visit Civic Park for some preparatory work before working from photographs for the main painting. 

SOCIETY EVENT: Coffee with art
Wednesday 3 September 2014
10.30am – 12.00pm
$15 members, $20 non–members
Payable at the door
Bookings required, call 02 4974 5123
Canberra Museum and Gallery Senior Curator Deborah Clark discusses the life and practice of Elioth Gruner.

LIFE IS A CABARET
Music of the 1920s
Sunday 21 & 28 September 2014
3.00pm – 4.00pm
Free, bookings required to ensure seating, call 02 4974 5100
Taking inspiration from Elioth Gruner's visit to Europe in 1923, visit the Gallery for these special performances, featuring soprano Kathleen Moore with Erin Sweetman on the Gallery's Stuart and Sons piano. 

WEEK 1 SPRING SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS
For children under 12 years old
$15 per child, includes all materials
Bookings and payment required,
call 02 4974 5100

For children 5 – 8 years old:
10.30am – 12.30pm
Tue 23, Wed 24 & Thu 25 Sept 2014

For children 8 – 12 years old:
2.30pm – 4.30pm
Tue 23 & Wed 24 Sept 2014

Sibling friendly, 5 – 12 years old:
2.30pm – 4.30pm
Thu 25 Sept 2014

Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by works in the exhibition. Younger children will make landscape dioramas while older children will create 2D landscapes using colour theory and compositional techniques.

ANNUAL SASSAFRAS PIANO RECITAL
Will Cesta on the Gallery's 
Stuart and Sons piano
Friday 26 September 2014
6.30pm - 8.30pm
$50 per person, bookings required
Includes refreshments, call 02 4974 5100
In celebration of the acquisition of the Gallery's Stuart and Sons piano, the 2014 performance features celebrated Novocastrian pianist Will Cesta. 

AN AFTERNOON IN THE SUNLIGHT 
Hunter wine and produce tasting with Jazz music

Presented in partnership with Pepper Tree Wines
Sunday 26 October 2014
1.00pm: Guided tour of Elioth Gruner: the texture of light (optional)
2.00pm: Wine & produce tasting
Jazz til 4:30pm, with a complimentary glass of your favourite wine
$30 per person, bookings required
call 02 4974 5100
When we think of Elioth Gruner we think of land and light. To mark the end of this exhibition come to the Gallery for an elegant afternoon sampling produce from our local land while mellowing with jazz music in the spring sunlight. 





James Drinkwater

Walking through Sunday II 2012

Artist James Drinkwater in conversation with Lauren van Katwyk, Audience Development and Visitor Services Coordinator

LVK: Walking through Sunday II was from an exhibition called The Ocean Parade. How did this series come about?

JD: Prior to that show I spent three years living in Berlin. In that time I undertook a residency in Leipzig, made a trip to Australia and had a residency in Kenya. It felt like a parade across oceans gathering visual information. That series was informed by these experiences. Ultimately though, my experience in Kenya was such a dominant and visceral blow to the senses, making it the overriding theme in that body of work.

LVK: The colours you’ve chosen in this composition are interesting, and there seems to be strong attention to pattern and mark making. Is there a reason for this?

JD: People have said that series was dense and manic but that was precisely my experience in Kenya, a dense cacophony of sound, colour and pattern. I was compelled to respond to this and Walking through Sunday ll was a success for me in terms of articulating the experience.

LVK: How did the residency in Kenya shape or influence your work?

JD: I stayed 60km NE of Nairobi in a village called Mangu’. I taught art at Famila Moja Children’s Home and at schools in surrounding villages. I took walks, made drawings and navigated my way around on the back of motorbikes. One Sunday the children took me to their church. We walked through red dirt lanes lined with brilliant coloured shops and homes. Experiences like this, along with the textiles and the vitality of the people provided a lot of the colouring and iconography for my work.

LVK: What’s next for you?

JD: I’m working on a new suite of paintings The boy and the ballet for a show at Damien Minton Gallery opening on 11 March 2014. I continue to investigate concerns of intimacy, memory and life by the sea. Last year I began classes in classical ballet to extend my practice both pictorially and lyrically. It’s the poetry and choreography in the everyday that excites me.

 

Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 45, Number 1
February - June 2014




Joseph McGlennon

Thylacine study number 4 2013

From being brandished on bottles of beer to the tragic skeletons housed in the Tasmanian Museum & Art Gallery, the Thylacine is the mysterious and tragic creature whose elimination from its wild environs has become an allegorical tale of the trappings of hubris on the environment. Able to exist in the inhospitable wilderness of Tasmania for generations, the Thylacine’s contact with human settlement led to a fatalistic pathway to destruction - a vital lesson for us in the 21st century.

Art photographer Joseph McGlennon has long been fascinated with the precarious nature of the Thylacine that was hunted to near extinction in the early 1900s to their last known female dying in captivity in Hobart zoo in 1936. Fascinated by these illusive and almost mystical creatures, McGlennon’s series of ‘staged’ photographs explores the complexity of extinction, the incursion of humans into the environment and the fatalistic demise of the Thylacine. The work laments the loss of this species that has encapsulated Tasmanian identity.

Through constructed mise-en-scène, with fires in the distance and native flora and fauna, McGlennon’s works are theatrical stills that echo a Victorian approach to the painted Arcadian vista.

McGlennon’s exploration of the Tasmanian landscape and the taxidermied Thylacine in these constructed images portray another aspect of Tasmania that complement works in the Gallery collection by Tasmanian artist Philip Wolfhagen. The stripes of the Thylacine also echo the grain of the Tasmanian sassafras in the Gallery’s Stuart & Sons piano.

Sarah Johnson
Curator
Newcastle Art Gallery

 

Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 45, Number 1
February - June 2014




THE TOKYO CONNECTION: Shoji Hamada and Kanjiro Kawai

24 May - 10 August

This exhibition will feature Japanese ceramics from the Newcastle Art Gallery collection. Specifically, a selection of the Gallery¡'s holdings by Shōji Hamada (1894 - 1978) and Kanjirō Kawai (1890 - 1966) created between the 1930s and 1970s. Both artists started their influential careers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and, in the process, changed the perception of the clay medium worldwide.

 

'LIVING FLOWERS' SUSHI BAR
Special Ikebana event
Friday 1 August 2014
6.00pm - 8.00pm
$30 per person (includes Ikebana materials with sushi & cocktail samples)
Places are limited
Bookings and payment required Call 02 4974 5100

Unwind from your week with relaxation for mind, body and soul. This is a special opportunity to observe the ceremonious practice of Ikebana with experts from Sogetsu Teachers Association Australia. Feel the calm and closeness to nature that this traditional Japanese art form promotes, as you create your own Ikebana flower arrangements. Afterwards, enjoy samples from our sushi and cocktail bar.

 

EXHIBITION TALK & IKEBANA
by Exhibition Coordinator Tobias Spitzer, followed by Ikebana demonstration by Sogetsu Teachers
Saturday 2 August 2014
11.00am - 12.00pm
Free, bookings required
Call 02 4974 5100

Both The Tokyo connection: Shōji Hamada and Kanjirō Kawai exhibition and Ikebana share a mutual drive for beautiful shape and form. Enjoy a tour of the exhibition with the curator, followed by experienced teachers demonstrating their Ikebana practice in the Gallery.

 

SOCIETY EVENT
Coffee with art
Wednesday 6 August 2014
10.30am - 12.00pm
$15 members, $20 non-members
Payable at the door
Bookings required call 02 4974 5123

With a special interest in Japanese ceramics, Paul Davis and Jacqueline Clayton talk about the works of Shōji Hamada and Kanjirō Kawai.




Eli, 9 years old

"The boat is in a race against a surfer and there's an oil rig."


Brett Whiteley was only seven years old when he won his first art prize. To coincide with the Whiteley on Water exhibition at Newcastle Art Gallery 2 November 2013 - 23 February 2014, children were invited to submit their own works of art to the Gallery. These are a selection of works from those submissions.




In Patricia Piccinini’s Surrogate (for the northern hairy nosed wombat) a placid creature harbors six wombats in varying stages of development in pouches that run along its armoured back. Piccinini’s endearing creature, part mammal, part reptile and part hobgoblin, is a mother by proxy, a seemingly benign host for the threatened indigenous species of the northern hairy nosed wombat. Surrogate is replete with its own habitat: a futuristic looking baby blue canopy of padded leather. This synthetic home informs us that the creature’s home is not in the natural environment, an anachronism in the world of bio-medical technology.

Surrogate (for the northern hairy nosed wombat) continues Piccinini’s ambivalent interrogation of new science. Could we save ourselves, and the species we have threatened, through genetic engineering? Her choice of an endangered, near extinct, species renders the debate as alarmingly prophetic. In fact scientists are currently experimenting with the use of the southern hairy nosed wombat as a host for its rare cousin, the northern hairy nosed wombat. Surrogate (for the northern hairy nosed wombat) is fascinating because it invites folklore and speculation in a world that is largely silenced from scientific discourse. The artist invites the beholder to consider the pleasures and disasters of a science that is currently restricted to the passionless, sterile world of the science lab.




The gentle, lilting form of a palm leaf floats across the gallery wall. The contour of a reclining body slowly reveals itself. In Untitled (palm leaf) Hossein Valamanesh has skilfully manipulated a dried, fallen leaf by teasing out the lower frond to create a delicate fringe and plaiting and shaping the upper frond, to suggest a reclining figure. Deceptively simple, Valamanesh’s Untitled (palm leaf) is a characteristically meditative and poetic work.

The symbol of the palm leaf and its figurative sculpting (a self portrait perhaps) are powerful signifiers of Valamanesh’s perceived otherness and exoticism. Arriving in Australia in 1973 at the age of twenty-four, Valamanesh has spent almost his entire career in Australia and yet his work is haunted with ancestral connections and memory.

The palm leaf is an age-old symbol of the exotic and the other. A botanic species redolent with associations of the Middle East, it is a straightforward signifier of Valamanesh’s homeland of Iran. However, the palm is also a species found here in Australia. Often planted in isolation or estranged from its rainforest habitat, the palm appears dislocated in domestic, suburban Australia. As a tree endemic to both past and present homelands, the palm signals the artist’s search for a connection between both places; the plaiting of the form signals the weaving of cultural influences in the formation of self and identity. The silhouette or shadow is also a signature form for Valamanesh; a mystical projection of self hood and a symbol of possibility, flux and change.







New Sculpture by Caroline Rothwell and Kathy Temin

7 November 2009 - 14 February 2010

Two contemporary Australian artists challenge the definition of sculpture in this exhibition. Caroline Rothwell uses the traditional sculptural process of casting but in the case of the gigantic inflatable, Man of Exotopos ii, she casts with air, while Kathy Temin has been commissioned to make a new soft sculpture in her signature faux fur.

 

Artist's talk
6.00 - 7.00pm Tuesday 24 November

As part of the WEA Art Appreciation series, artist Caroline Rothwell will discuss her work.
$20, $15 (conc.)

 

White Landscape Ledge (detail) 2009
Kathy Temin White Landscape Ledge (detail) 2009 synthetic fur, filling, wood and steel courtesy of the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney
This project was made possible with funding provided by Don and Justine Osborne through the Newcastle Region Art Gallery Foundation 2009.
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection




Elaine Wanatjura Lane is one of the celebrated Tjanpi Desert weavers. She was born and grew up near Blackstone Ranges or Papulankutja in Central Australia. A senior law woman Lane has been weaving since 1995 as well as teaching and attending conferences on behalf of the Tjanpi weavers. Together with other weavers she created the Tjanpi Toyota which won the 22nd Telstra NATSI Art Award in 2005. Lane is well known for her large scale, figurative work, choosing to make life size figures and animals, rather than the more typical vessel forms.




Cossington Smith's experiments in Modernism were conducted over a lifetime spent painting in the same house in the Sydney suburb of Turramurra.

In Trees the familiarity of the subject matter, the artist's own garden, liberates Cossington Smith to create this symphony of colour and movement. A kaleidoscope range of shapes and colours generates a sense of dynamism through the painting. Fragments of unprimed canvas, boldly drawn outlines and the arrangement of expressive brushstrokes into a quilt-like patter all characterise this work as distinctly modern...




Pasha public art unveiled

 

On Friday 5 June 2009 Newcastle Lord Mayor John Tate and Minister for the Hunter Jodi McKay MP unveiled a sculpture to mark the grounding of the Pasha Bulker in fierce storms at Nobbys beach on 8 June 2007.

 

Lord Mayor JOHN TATE says the ship’s grounding two years ago received national media attention and attracted thousands of people from Newcastle and beyond to witness the event - many of whom followed the evolving story on a daily basis.

 

“That weekend will long be remembered not only by Novocastrians but visitors to our city. The Pasha Bulker is still very much a curiosity and the public art is likely to become a popular attraction for visitors to the city who want to see where the ship ran aground.”

 

Minister for the Hunter JODI MCKAY MP said the memory of the Pasha Bulker represents the struggle and camaraderie of Newcastle during an incredibly challenging time.

 

“While personal recollections of the period will remain etched in our memories, this artwork is something tangible the community, and also visitors to Newcastle, can experience,” Ms McKay said.

 

“Newcastle has a fantastic coastline and Nobbys is already a great attraction. The public art will further enhance this area and encourage visitors to come to our city and see where the drama unfolded that captured the world’s attention.”

 

Ms McKay said the NSW Government was pleased to support the project with a $20,000 grant through Arts NSW.

 

Public Art Curator JAMES COLLIS says the commemorative sculpture, titled Grounded, has been made by renowned Sydney based sculptor John Petrie.”

 

Grounded is an abstract representation of the ship’s bow. The shape and colour of the sculpture, and its physical placement at Nobbys, will be an important memory marker for the community and a powerful stand-alone work of art.”

 

“An original section of 22mm plate steel from the rudder of the Pasha Bulker has been incorporated into the work. The main body of the work is made from 12mm plate steel and is approximately 2 metres in height and 6 metres in length.”

 

Petrie career highlights include:

 - The Thursday Plantation Sculpture Prize in 1996.

 - The Waverley Council Prize at Sculpture by the Sea in 1997 and Director’s Prize in 2001.

 - Selection in the Wynne exhibition in 1997.

 - An invitation to exhibit in the US Key West sculpture exhibition in 2006.

 

Petrie has family in Newcastle and has used local industry to produce this work, employing a team including a consultant engineer, fabricator, heavy plate roller and industrial painter. The construction of the sculpture used methods comparative to the shipbuilding industry.

 

Grounded was commissioned by Newcastle City Council with support from Arts NSW and One Steel. Check out the artwork photo gallery.

 

Grounded: Commemorative sculpture unveiling
1pm, Friday 5 June 2009
Nobbys Beach Promenade

 

Grounded 2009

At the unveiling of Grounded by John Petrie, 5 June 2009.

 

Grounded 2009

John Petrie, Grounded 2009. plate steel, incorporating the rudder from the Pasha Bulker

Commissioned by Newcastle City Council with support from Arts NSW and One Steel.




Artist Talk: Fiona Hall

31 July 2009

6:00pm

 

Be inspired by one of Australia's leading contemporary artists as the MCA’s most successful exhibition ever comes to Newcastle! Fiona Hall: Force Field is an in-depth survey of the work of Australian artist Fiona Hall from the 1970s to the present, produced collaboratively between the MCA and City Gallery Wellington.

 

Free admission. Please RSVP to the Gallery on 02 4974 5112.

For more information on Fiona Hall: Force Field, log onto the exhibitions page.

 




An Animal Attraction

 

With Spring just around the corner, the nesting season is upon us, and Newcastle Region Art Gallery is celebrating the promise of new life with the appearance of The offering 2009, a work of art by internationally renowned artist Patricia Piccinini.

 

Breaking gallery tradition, The Offering is a tactile work of art that visitors are invited to touch and feel. 

With its soft skin and infantile features, the baby creature evokes an urge to touch and parent, its expression one of comfort and contentedness.”

Ron Ramsey, Director, Newcastle Region Art Gallery

 

A prototype for a later work, The offering is an extraordinary creature whose vulnerability belies an exploration of the consequences of genetic engineering. Piccinini also explores this theme in one of the Gallery’s best-loved contemporary works of art, Nature’s little helpers – Surrogate (for the Northern Hairy Nosed Wombat) 2004, which is also on display as part of Animal Attraction.

 

Curatorial Consultant Lisa Slade will discuss both of these works of art when she talks on Animal Attraction on 28 July as part of the Gallery’s regular Art Appreciation series.

 

New life has also been the theme of the Gallery’s latest public art program, running throughout July. Tot Art has encouraged new mums and dads to bring their babies into the Gallery for an exploration of art. The final Tot Art will be held next Wednesday, 29 July 2009.

 

Animal Attraction is on display at the Gallery until 2 August 2009.

 

Art Appreciation runs in partnership with WEA. The next series starts at 6pm on 28 July 2009, and then runs weekly until 1 September 2009.

 

Patricia Piccinini The Offering 2009

silicone, animal fur, lambskin




live-muloobinba-web1

 

Newcastle Region Art Gallery will be presenting the exhibitions Stone Country – Salt Water and Albert Namatjira: The Legacy of Hermannsberg, as well as a free children’s Artcart workshop from 10:30am – 12:30pm, as part of Muloobinba: Walkabout Newcastle.


Muloobinba: Walkabout Newcastle, created by L!vesites in association with BlackChili Productions, brings a day of indigenous Australian culture to five different Newcastle locations on Sunday the 30th of August between 10:20am and 2pm.

 

Workshops and exhibitions will be conducted by prominent cultural practitioners including Aunty Phyllis Darcy, Mick Didge, Floyd Tighe of Biami Mara, the Yellana Dancers, Auriel and Reuben Andrews, Djapa Bush Tucker and contemporary hip-hop groups MC Rival and The Last Kinection.

 

The twenty-minute long workshops, performances and exhibitions will be happening simultaneously throughout the locations, allowing the public to “walkabout” from venue to venue to experience the different aspects of Aboriginal culture.

 

Muloobinba is the traditional Aboriginal name for Newcastle, meaning “Place of the Sea Ferns”.

 

Download a map of the day's events. 




CLASH: contemporary sculptural ceramics

13 February – 18 April

Clash explores contemporary Australian ceramic sculpture - each work selected contains a clash or contradiction between the materiality of the work, its subject matter and/or its meaning. Beneath the whimsical and often beautiful surface of these ceramic objects lurk ideas and provocations regarding identity, sexuality and even violence. Contemporary artists represented in the exhibition are Tracie Bertram, Penny Byrne, Margaret Dodd, Michael Doolan, Myfanwy Gullifer, Vicki Hamilton, Danie Mellor, Jenny Orchard, Pam Sinnott and Gerry Wedd. Additional works from the collection, including work by John Perceval, will also be on display.

 

Artist's forum
11.00am - 1.00pm Saturday 13 February

Join curator Tobias Spitzer for an overview of the exhibition, followed by presentations by artists Tracie Bertram, Myfanwy Gullifer and Gerry Wedd.
Free.

 

Coffee with Art
10.30am Wednesday 3 March

Tobias Spitzer, guest curator of the exhibition Clash, talks on ceramics.
$10 Gallery Society members, $15 non-members.

 

Art Appreciation
6.00pm Tuesday 9 March

Public Programs Officer Penelope Finnigan will discuss traditions and technique on display in Clash.
$20/$15 conc. Reduced rate for enrolment in full series. 

 

Education
Focus tours available for primary and secondary students.




Hit the Bottle returns home ready for the big auction on Friday 7 August in the 1233 ABC Newcastle Breakfast program.

 

It all started from environmentally conscious listeners cleaning up the environment and donating used plastic water bottles through a request from the 1233 Breakfast program. It grew into an inspiring marine themed artwork that toured the city. We are now going back to where it all began with theHit the Bottle artwork returning to the 1233 ABC Newcastle studios.

 

The community is invited into the 1233 foyer where the Hit the Bottle artwork will be on display until Friday 7 August. It will then be up for auction to raise money for the Marine Coastal Community Network – a not for profit organisation who helps build community, industry and government support for marine and coastal biodiversity, conservation and sustainable use of natural resources.

 

The artwork (installation style), created by artists Jane Gillings and Alison McDonald incorporates coral reef, fish, jelly fish and other sea creatures and has adapted to each location during its tour. Newcastle Region Art Gallery, Hunter Water, Hunter Street Tafe Campus, NBN Television, Newcastle Region Library and Macquarie Generation have all welcomed the artwork into their workplace where it has added a magical aspect to its surroundings.

 

The Hit the Bottle artwork will also look great in your workplace, or donate it to a school library, community or exhibition space. So start getting your bid ready for the big auction! Join the 1233 Breakfast team for a sausage sizzle from 6am – 7.45am on Friday 7 August and help raise money for a worthy cause.

 

Bidding will open 5.30am Thursday morning – 6 August. Bidding ends 7.45am Friday 7 August – tune into Aaron Kearney’s Breakfast program on 1233 ABC Newcastle for your chance to place your bid.

 

Click on this link to go to the Hit the Bottle story on our website – don’t forget to click on the ‘related links’ at the bottom of the story for all the info on the Hit the Bottle tour and pics of this amazing artwork.

http://abc.net.au/local/stories/2009/03/13/2515340.htm?site=newcastle




The Elaine and Jim Wolfensohn Gift Suitcase Kits are coming to Newcastle Region Art Gallery

3 August – 28 August

 

In 1988 the National Gallery of Australia, through funds donated by Jim Wolfenson, developed suitcase kits for the enjoyment of children.

 

Newcastle Region Art Gallery will be borrowing two of the suitcases, the Red case: myths and rituals which is filled exotic and curious works focused on beliefs and symbols from around the world, and the Yellow case: form, space and design containing objects as diverse as bush toys and bronze sculptures.

 

The kits will not only for use be available within the Gallery but also within the classroom, with Gallery staff available to visit your school and facilitate a fantastic and unique hands-on experience. Enquiries and reservations to Penelope Finnigan on 02 4974 5112.

 

To digitally explore the Wolfensohn Gift Suitcases, follow this link.

 

For more information on public programs run by the Gallery, including information for Schools, go to the Learning page on our website.




Albert Namatjira and the legacy of Hermannsburg

A focus exhibition

1 August - 27 September 2009

Fifty years after the death of Albert Namatjira, the first Aboriginal artist to gain acclaim in Australia, his legacy continues at Hermannsburg (Ntaria) in Central Australia. This exhibition commemorates Namatjira's influence and includes new work from Hermannsburg.




More information coming soon.




Winner: Release your inner poet

To coincide with Poets Paint Words II, the Newcastle Region Art Gallery hosted a poetry competition, inspired by the above painting by Tim Storrier. We received over 170 entries into the competition, and 11 winners were chosen by poet and University of Newcastle academic Maria Freij to receive book prizes courtesy of the Sydney Writer's Festival.

The winners were: David Swain, Amelia Filmer-Sankey, Jan Dean, Po Yu (Eric) Wang, Anne B Udy, F Lucero, Gail Hennessy, Caitlin De Pater, Claire Williams, Jake, and Robert Henderson.

 

Below is one of the winning poems.

 

Fire Stories (after Tim Storrier)

Claire Williams

An elegant fire, this, unspent

Assured and centre-stage

The log of ember extended

Bedded in calm landscape

Fire is the artist’s story

And I have my own to tell.

 

My fire was different, unseen and lacking beauty

Smoke only, silence, a monster sun

And just a clumsy girl to tell it.

First day of high school

Evacuated to the beach, we tried to breathe

Not home safe til evening, astonished by the world.

 

My father, not a religious man,

Sacrificed much (a nightly ritual)

Eyes bright, cheeks aflame, alone:

Newspapers, cartons, clothing

His wedding certificate, charred but saved

(My mother thinking it

Better to marry than to burn.)

 

In the shadow of Mt Wellington

Our house froze, and us in it

Save only the lounge room - Tierra del Fuego

Ablaze with roaring heat

Roasting, I disrobed, moaned, begged relief

No use – the Inferno forbade escape.

 

My friend, lately returned to Hobart,

Writes of drowned worlds

Recalling Lake Pedder and lost dreams.

 

School is gone now, and my father, and the house

But looking at this painting

I remember fire and know it still.




Ekphrasis: ‘Manhunt Near My Home’

by Irvine Homer

for Tom Carment

Robert Gray

The artist was a farm labourer,

in what he called ‘jam tin country’

and himself a captive

when he painted the escapee.

 

Nineteen fifty-nine, Emu Plains –

there met on a prison farm

two young men, in for car theft,

Simmonds and Newcombe.

 

They broke out. One was caught

in days. The picture reminds

of how at fourteen I admired

that Houdini, Kevin Simmonds.

 

Each day for weeks, the biggest

manhunt in our history,

and yet the wireless told us

that again he’d slipped away,

 

despite 500 police,

with submachine guns and flares

and a helicopter, and despite

the 300 volunteers

 

(who were shameful, I thought –

more than any society,

we oughtn’t side with overdogs

nor demand servility).

 

Despite the legends, rebellion

is light in our inheritance.

What outraged the crowd I thought

was in fact a mischance –

 

Surprised, in making their escape,

one of them gave a smack

to a guard, with a baseball bat,

and caused his skull to crack.

 

Something they had often seen

in a Saturday picture show,

but the sort of weight to apply

was difficult to know.

 

There are, I realize now,

further victims in such a crime.

They made him ‘comfortable’

with a blanket – waste of time.

 

The police look to their own,

they moved like a bushfire;

brought back Ray Kelly, inspector,

who’d wanted to retire;

 

his style, an axe’s bite;

the professed killer of three men;

in trench coat, felt hat, iced

spectacles; temper worn thin.

 

The pair hid in Sydney showground –

tunneling piled sacks of wheat

to make a cave; stole milk bottles

from doorsteps, before daylight.

 

Then, Newcombe was caught. Later,

they found what Simmonds would do

was break into cars and listen

to the police radio.

 

He flickered through ragged suburbs,

eluding the blades of torches,

dissolved in misty streetlight;

food sometimes on back porches.

 

After school, with my bike, I had

the newspaper delivery

for a country town; and each day

paused, to follow this story

 

in different papers. Then pedalled

at twilight about the town

on gravel streets and grass verges;

the rolled newspapers thrown

 

into the yards I pretended

were sticks of dynamite

that could scare off the bloodhounds

and put the police to flight.

 

A rebel with cause – the suburbs;

ahead of the sixties; his hair

like Elvis, but more admirable,

to me, than any pop star.

 

His sister spoke up for him;

she said he’d just too much life

and was good to his mother.

There were offers to be his wife.

 

And here he is in this picture,

near Newcastle, New South Wales,

a hundred miles from Sydney,

in a culvert as light fails.

 

He’s small, in the bottom right,

beneath the landscape’s grandeur.

There is a solidarity

in that he’s by the signature.

 

Along the base, a dirt road,

with a see-saw’s tilt, and under

this is where he’s hidden;

above, two policemen linger.

 

To the left, the road recurs,

close, on a black, cairn-shaped hill;

from the right, a wedge of forest;

between is a skewed triangle,

 

the foremost paddock, burnt orange

the same as the road, which makes

the shaft on a striking form,

on a broad arrow or great axe,

 

that’s completed with wind-break trees.

On this clearing, minutely, 

the police disperse, clothes-peg shapes;

like ants, you’d have to say.

 

No houses, but from the title

they must be somewhere near.

The hour of the chooks, rounded up,

of a redolent cow manure.

 

Then higher again, in this tall,

vertical painting, the sun

on other paddocks, their strewn shards.

And then, another dimension –

 

in long pleats, blue-black forest,

a cold slag, laid transversely;

light on undulant edges of

elided gullies. Poignantly,

 

a powdered thin straight line of smoke

is leaving, along a ridge –

contrasts with tree-forms’ splintered bone

among the stippled foliage

 

of the lower half. There’s a calm

that Lawrence called reptilian,

the ancient stillness of the bush.

A dog; a coughing policeman.

 

Then further up, dark headlands

and bleached straits of ocean appear,

out of the Northern Renaissance,

by Altdorfer or Patenier.

 

An electric sunset. Plum-blue

at one side, its stacked thunder;

a new world in the other half,

with rosy and golden moisture.

 

Coifs and crests of coral, their lit

engorgement; a confluence

of labile traceries;

a strawberry deliquescence;

 

some honied Apocalypse;

magnolias’ pleated ivory;

the bruised limbs of seraphim;

an orchidean Arcady – 

 

as though in divine armada

Deity called on us at home

wanting to anoint the Earth,

our estrangement overcome.

 

This to balance Simmonds, taken

in a swamp, at 24;

now open-faced, brave, resourceful,

but he was to race no more.

 

Vengefully they would throw away

whatever he might have been.

Laying hands on him for photos,

Ray Kelly, brought to the scene.

 

Is that sunset meant to show

a heaven he’ll never win?

Not an angel with its trumpet

nor a scroll has been painted in.

 

Is it to show us ‘the lilies

. . . on the banks of Italy’;

that there is no distinction

between beauty and cruelty?

 

The painter, self-taught, bed-ridden;

the brushes tied to his wrists,

both legs had been amputated,

because he’d spondylitis.

 

Simmonds was put into Grafton,

the most notorious prison;

I saw the law was blood-stained

that well knew what would happen –

 

I’d heard of the Reception.

Within a few years, hanged himself;

grown tired of being beaten,

the only way to get relief.

 

I often used to imagine

there’d been a chance for him,

that a generous woman beckoned

as in a Hitchcock film –

 

Like Psyche, at the prow of time

I see that figure stand,

within a window’s bay, a wand

of candlelight in her hand.

 


Robert Gray is widely acknowledged as one of the nation's finest poets. He has published eight volumes of poetry. His memoir, The Land I Came Through Last, was published in 2008 by Giramondo.




Cleave

Mark Tredinnick

Last night I sat on the seawall and watched a woman in a purple bra,

         slow black hair falling past her waist, dancing alone in a lighted window

two storeys up at midnight. She danced mostly with her arms, as if she

         were climbing a rope, her body twisting behind her. There are things

I cannot turn from, and this was one, a study in muted abandon, probably

         not meant for me. But hey. She was still dancing when I walked away

 

Like a thief. I live my life in curves, my love, and you live yours in fractals.

         I hunger for form the way a martyr hopes for heaven. As if the shape

of things might fail if I don’t look on them and hold them close and write

         them tenderly down. I long for the body of the world with a purity

that would shame a mystic. Sense is salvation. Men fall in love, they say,

         through their eyes; women, through their ears. Which is lucky for me.

 

So, listen: it’s morning now and the sky’s as blue as it’ll ever get. Walk with me

         around the point. Let’s see if we can piece the shapely world together again

out of its vivid geometry of chaos. Hear how the shalestones in the cliff wall

         behind the beach want to teach you silence; see how the sea wants to preach

you wildness and fire. Beside the path between these two points of view, a

         white moth flies from one yellow flower to the next, making up its slender

 

Mind. Below us, the rock shelf, a petrified map of several city blocks, is losing,

         decorously and imperceptibly, its eternal argument with time. Out beyond

the whitewater, a hundred surfers, so many recumbent monks, bob their liturgy

         of thanks for the first decent swell in ages, and two slick silvergulls play their

plangent voices out behind them down the break. Thirteen tankers wait out

         the weekend along the horizon, and above, a small plane slopes insolently

 

South. The Bogey Hole looks like a Raymond Carver story waiting to happen

          to three men staring down the implacable sea, and a blue cattle dog behind

them chasing a lime-green ball, and a brownhaired girl wavering at the edge

          of her mismatched bikinis, her breasts escaping no one’s notice. But we turn

and leave them short of their denouement, the sun a klaxon in the catatonic

          sky, a blaze in your flaxen hair. The tankers have drifted together now like a pod

 

Of whales, a convivial moeity of heavy industrial behemoths passing judgment

          on the current account. Down on Wolfe Street, a violin walks a chromatic scale

upstairs from the basement of the redbrick terrace at the corner, and a rogue

          tanker crosses the street below us at double time and a half - business that can’t

wait till Monday. But the world can wait till Tuesday, at least, to get its story straight

          on us. At the docks, two cranes slowdance with midday, arms above their heads.

 


Poet and essayist Mark Tredinnick is the author of seven books, including The Blue Plateau, The Road South and The Little Green Grammar Book. His awards include The Newcastle Poetry Prize and the Calibre Essay Prize.

The Newcastle Region Art Gallery would like to thank The Lock Up for providing Mark with a residency for this exhibition.




Gathering

Jane Gibian

From the loamy sable soil, you’re born

with fern frond and grass stalk, neck

tapered as a leaf blade. When you leave,

 

the stems of your limbs fall away,

husks sinking into the layers

of mellowing leaf mould and clay.

 

In the breadth of your mind germinates

another tree, feeding on the pabulum

of the forest floor, its branchlets ribbed

 

and downy, young shoots sour to chew.

A feathery cowl of lichen might adorn

your sternum, or pearled-grey stripes

 

spread around the trunk. Grieve less

as sorrow coils, quietening into

a continuous self. Panicles of muted

 

blossom erupt from your fingertips:

the cycle turns as your cortex begins

to ripen under the beetle-limbed sun.

 


Jane Gibian is a Sydney poet whose most recent publications are her collection Ardent (Giramondo, 2007), and issue #83 of Wagtail poetry magazine (Picaro Press, December 2008).




METALAND

Kate Lilley

Telephone, bottle, stair

before and after

 

not Paris

not Sydney either

 

the shallow secret surfaces

planes of red and green

 

blue and ochre

figure and ground in tandem

 

white smudges

returning in translation

 

the passage is what counts

the envelopes back and forth

 

parcelled necessaries

going here and there

 


Kate Lilley’s first book of poems, Versary (Salt Publishing, 2002), won the Grace Leven Prize and was shortlisted for the NSW Premier's Award. She teaches feminist literary history and theory at the University of Sydney.




WHAT WE DO FOR SURVIVAL

Ivy Ireland

Green was first when the extant set out to condense itself down.

Then cinnabar: capillaries of fire and endlessness,

a nest of triangles, symbols of the Three Principles —

the Great Heart of some elapsed thing.

 

The only world we can cope with

is this shopping list of perceptions:

Round bottomed flask,

orphic egg, Aurora Borealis, lung sack,

runes in cubes seeming to square the circle,

Tetragrammaton in a cyclic continuum

trailing off the canvas, off this Perspex page.

 

Consciousness is not the only node

responding to this inoculation of meaning —

the body catches the flame, also.

Electrical signals smelt biology and chemistry

from shamanism and alchemy,

distil human genome research from arcane pixels,

coagulate white noise with all this green-black rapid change.

 

What lies beneath this ladder of coercion

is still beneath;

scumble-over it as we will,

set it free though we may.

 


Ivy Ireland is a poet, dancer, magician's assistant, mystic, casual lecturer, harpist, bookseller, and sideshow performer. In her spare time she is studying a PhD. Ivy likes cosmology and wishes she understood more about quantum physics.




Rhapsody

Judith Bishop

in which brown makes a foil for a thousand

events of knowledge blooming in a stroke

 

in which her hand dived and planted

something greater than a leaf

 

of which her back has bent and broken from the branch

a thousand sprigs

 

where the name hangs hidden that’s unravelled

by the work

 

by the side of which she sang

with the patience of a wasp

 

songs in which her body rings the yearly

changes of the place

 

as her leaves rush the canvas, purling this way

and that, caught in currents

 

of her memory, her feeling and her thought,

little blades

 

to pierce the dimness of an ordinary life

with a human luminosity, belief

 


Judith Bishop is a Sydney poet, linguist and translator. Event (Salt Publishing, 2007), her first collection, won the Anne Elder award and was shortlisted in the 2008 Victorian and Queensland Premier’s Awards.

 




After Fred Williams’ ‘You Yangs’

Michael Brennan

The way spirit tracks, in brushstrokes or words, you’d have Buckley’s

of getting it right, sensing how out here light does not fall. Waves of images

fill you so there’s nothing but to paint, though you don’t like it, this country

that’s in you, the red dust coating everything in one place or the granite now,

beneath your feet an island, quartz and feldspar cooled beneath an ocean

millions of years departed before your arrival.The wattle an edged blur in distance,

melancholy of the sheoaks weird, almost human with arms languorous,

supine to a brutality of light that in another language might be what is.

Gusts gathering yellow sands, slow erosion, there is no foreground, no back,

harlequin mistletoe, cherry ballart, the rock before you holding light

sings like everything else here, a silence you seek out the heart of.

So you work ten canvases at once though there’s no focal point, no cathedral

to wash time across, to track the changing planes of day, to assure meaning, only

what is built out of winds and dust and rock and song now half-heard, half-dead,

unlearnt names scattered on a map. The idea of elsewhere you leave behind

or end up like one of those figures in a landscape pointing the way ahead,

to something picturesque beyond the frame, the perspective warped

by some new Eden, some ancient Arcadia waiting to be plundered,a lie

like the emptiness gathered and named and transported here to build on.

Your eyes trace the line of scrub, manna gums and yellow gums scrimshawing

landscape, red gums sketch out a vertical line like a man practicing his whole life

to say a single word, finding his bearings in a place he can only come to slowly.

Crossing the lava, basalt, time uncovers you, uncovers land, an aspect of light

so what you abstract is not self, not place, not moment but all these spoken

by marks, scars in a greater shared immensity, a flat dun coloured space,

a stillness where the delusions of horizon have been erased, skins

peeled back,as if death could be cast off, its flesh left to dry in sun, and time

curved on itself, a husk.You watch in tongues of light, listening with eyes,

unearthing spirit amongst boneseed and sundew, perhaps love,

in daubs of skyless light, learning country, speaking it as it speaks you.

 


Michael Brennan was born in Sydney in 1973. His second collection, Unanimous Night, was released in 2008 by Salt Publishing. His work has been translated into French, Spanish, Japanese, Chinese and Italian.




The shock of the new: Gallery A Sydney 1964 – 1983

Newcastle Region Art Gallery, 9 May - 19 July 2009

 

Gallery A is ‘a home of the purest, most painterly painting,’

Daniel Thomas, The Sydney Morning Herald, 22 November, 1973.

 

Newcastle Region Art Gallery presents Gallery A Sydney 1964–1983: the first in-depth survey of the most influential and occasionally controversial art gallery in NSW during this seminal time in art history.

 

To open on 9 May 2009, Gallery A Sydney is an exploration of art in Sydney during the iconic 1960s and 1970s. Viewers are taken behind the scenes to view the artworks that made headlines in this politically and socially turbulent time. It is modern art history as seen through the lens of one gallery, the iconic Gallery A situated in working class Paddington near Sydney's CBD.

 

Gallery A was the first gallery in NSW devoted solely to exhibiting abstract art. In doing so, it launched the careers of many major figures in Australian art and helped break the shackles on Sydney's long-held obsession with figurative art. The Gallery was a melting pot of ideas, a meeting place for creative minds and a backdrop for artistic expression. It was also one of the first commercial galleries in Australia to exhibit Aboriginal paintings as contemporary art. Finally, it helped to secure Sydney's placement at the forefront of the international contemporary art world just as New York was emerging as the arts capital of the English-speaking world.

 

Gallery A Sydney opened in 1964 against a backdrop of rapid cultural, social and political change; artists sought new ways to interpret the changing world around them. From New York to Sydney, creative minds were experimenting with new styles of art to challenge accepted cultural values.

 

Gallery A was launched in Melbourne in 1959 by art entrepreneur Max Hutchinson and sculptor Clement Meadmore. The Melbourne gallery was one of the first in Australia devoted entirely to exhibiting contemporary abstract art. It won widespread acclaim for the quality of its exhibitions and Gallery A Sydney opened five years later in 1964.

 

The Sydney Gallery was virtually an overnight success. Under the directorship of Max Hutchinson, Ann Lewis AM and Rua Osborne, it quickly became known as the city's most progressive commercial gallery.

 

"Gallery A provided artists with a place where creativity could thrive. In doing so, it allowed abstract art to move into the mainstream and paved the way for many of Australia's best-known artists. Its formation will always remain a vehement reminder that art can and does change the course of history and the artistic and political mindset of the day," said Ron Ramsey, Director of Newcastle Region Art Gallery.

 

"The decision by its Directors to show Western Desert painters was a significant step forward in Australian art history which pre-empted the world-wide fascination with contemporary Australian Indigenous painting," Ramsey said.

 

"I vividly remember the dynamism of the early sixties in Sydney," said Ann Lewis. "This city was overflowing with talented and ambitious artists but few if any were being exhibited in private or public galleries. We were all frustrated that despite major shifts in the social and political landscape, art in Australia was stuck in its long-held figurative tradition. Nolans and Drysdales dominated gallery walls and other local contemporary artists were still not being considered. Gallery A ended all that and it provided a voice for the next generation of artists to be heard for the first time."

 

Gallery A opened in 1964 in Paddington and the Directors faced controversy almost immediately. The Sydney Vice Squad visited the Gallery in 1965 to close down an exhibition. Titled Paintin’ A-Go-Go!, the exhibition by Mike Brown contained a number of four-letter words. Such was the magistrate's reaction to the work that the 27 year old artist was sentenced to three month's hard labour. The move sent a wave of anger throughout the arts community, which was outraged and fearful of censorship. The sentence was converted to a modest fine on appeal.

 

During the experimental 1970s, the Gallery continued to attract Sydney's most creative minds, as well as its most fashionable. Actors, artists and musicians passed through the doors throughout the decade. Its 'cool' status was enhanced in 1970 when Hutchinson opened a subsidiary of Gallery A in New York in the heart of today's SoHo and art gallery district. The New York Gallery helped to bring New York artists to Australia. Hutchinson was instrumental in brokering the acquisition of Jackson Pollock’s Blue Poles by the National Gallery of Australia. In the early 1980s, Gallery A continued to challenge the status quo. It was in 1982 one of the first commercial galleries in Australia to exhibit Aboriginal paintings as contemporary art works, as opposed to ethnographic art. In showing work by Western Desert artists, it was a critical step in establishing the development and support of Aboriginal artists. Gallery A Sydney held its final exhibition in 1983.

 

The Gallery's overwhelming success was largely due to Ann Lewis, today one of Australia's most respected collectors, as well as one of Australia’s most prominent arts patrons. Ann Lewis was a foundation member of the Visual Arts Board, Australia Council, President of the Art Gallery Society in the Art Gallery of NSW, and a member of the Aboriginal Arts and Crafts Council and the International Council of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Last year, Ann also donated $4 million worth of art to the Newcastle Gallery. The generous donation will considerably boost the Gallery‟s permanent collection and enhance its exhibition potential.

 

In recognition of Lewis's remarkable contribution to the Australian arts scene, collectors across Australia have commissioned a portrait of her to be unveiled for the first time at the Gallery A exhibition official opening on 15 May 2009. The artwork is a hologram created by internationally renowned Australian artist Paula Dawson. It touches on the prominent times in Ann's life and considers how she sees the world versus how the world sees Ann.

 

Australian artists in this exhibition include: Ralph Balson, Mike Brown, Charles Callins, Fred Cress, Virginia Cuppaidge, Janet Dawson, Lesley Dumbrell, Richard Dunn, John Firth-Smith, Bert Flugelman, Rosalie Gascoigne, Guy Grey-Smith, Frank Hinder, Margel Hinder, Michael Johnson, Tim Johnson, Peter Kennedy, Robert Klippel, Colin Lanceley, Bea Maddock, Clement Meadmore, Andrew Nott, Alan Oldfield, John Olsen, Stanislaus Ostoja-Kotkowski, Paul Partos, Peter Powditch, Charles Reddington, Ron Robertson-Swann, Gareth Sansom, Michael Snape, Michael Taylor, Ann Thomson, Vernon Treweeke, and Western Desert artists Mick Namarai Tjapaltjari and Johnny Warangkula Tjupurrula.

 

New York artists include: Natvar Bhavsar, Murray Reich, Milton Resnick, Garry Rich, Edwin Ruda and John Seery.

 

For further details, go to the Exhibitions Page.




Newcastle Region Art Gallery news archives

2009 

Art treasure trove gifted to Newcastle

Hit the Bottle with 1233 ABC Newcastle




POETS PAINT WORDS II 2009

16 May - 5 July 2009

Australia's most celebrated poets have been commissioned to write a poem inspired by a painting in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection. This year’s line up of poets includes Judith Bishop, Michael Brennan, Michael Farrell, Jane Gibian, Robert Gray, Ivy Ireland, Anthony Lawrence, Kate Lilley and Mark Tredinnick. Poets Paint Words II is curated by Peter Minter and Lisa Slade, in conjunction with Sydney Writers’ Festival.

 

Poets Paint Words II is running at the Newcastle Region Art Gallery from 16 May - 5 July 2009. For more information, go to the Exhibitions Page; or read the poems online here.

 


SWF EVENT DESCRIPTIONS

Poets Paint Words II: the poets read I

Friday, May 22, 6pm - 7.30pm

9 Australian poets have responded to 9 paintings in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection. Join poets Ivy Ireland, Anthony Lawrence andMark Tredinnick as they read their poems and launch the exhibition.

 

Poets Paint Words II: the poets read II

Saturday, May 23, 11am - 12noon

Poets Judith Bishop and Michael Farrell read their poems inspired by paintings in the NRAG collection.

 

Poets Paint Words II: the poets read III

Saturday, May 23, 4pm - 5pm

Poets Jane Gibian, Robert Gray and Michael Brennan read their poems inspired by paintings in the NRAG collection.

Bookings essential for all readings: 4974 5112




Untitled in Opening Tuning

Anthony Lawrence

 

The vineyard is pinstriped with light and shade, though shade is scarce.

To the south, a fire will soon become a killing furnace yet here,

on the last day of the first month of the year, the news is good.

The Triffids play to all but empty grass. Paul Kelly’s quiet set calls

the faithful out from under tents and trees. When he leaves the stage

it’s almost dark. After the break, Leonard Cohen and his band walk out

to a standing ovation. It’s not the crowd but what it brings and receives

that matters. The man who wears an Armani suit to sweep the floor

and do his washing doffs his fedora, smiles, then steps into the opening

chords of Dance Me To The End of Love. Someone nearby is sobbing.

A man holds his daughter up as if to receive a blessing. When he lets

her down, the bottle of Ballantines we’d smuggled in is kicked from

my hand as I fill a glass. I pour another as the band goes into The Future.

Cohen’s sense of style and old world manners are evident and in

abundance. Often, as the Shepherd of the Strings, Javier Mas is soloing

on the banduria, sitting on the edge of a red armchair, Cohen kneels

before him, hat in hand, watching respectfully. This gesture is afforded

everyone, and often. There Ain’t No Cure For Love sets the tone

and spirit for the night. I overhear a woman say she’d been with him

in London. He prefaces songs with stories of depression, meditation

and how, in the end, after years of drugs and study, cheerfulness just kept on

breaking through. After Bird on the Wire, in the first intermission,

I walk through the crowd and listen. Up on the hill it seems too quiet

for a concert, with people standing around as if trying to remember

something they’d meant to say, or do. The stage is like a scallop shell,

with dark blue screens and Cohen’s own design: a heart with

a hummingbird in flight above it. As he introduces The Sisters of Mercy,

I want to shout something about George Johnston, but keep myself busy

and in check with a bottle and a glass. Leonard Cohen knows how

reclusiveness and shunning fellowship affect the head and heart.

At the end of If It Be Your Will and before I Tried to Leave You,

he offers his blessings to those returning with friends and family

and to those going home to their solitude. Then it’s over.

At 74 he won’t be back. Walking to the bus, I see an old friend

from Wagga. He’s off somewhere with the night in his head

and I will not interrupt him.

 


Anthony Lawrence lives in Newcastle. His most recent book of poems Bark (UQP) was shortlisted for the 2008 Judith Wright Calanthe Award and the Age Book of the Year Awards. The Welfare of my Enemy, a verse novel, is forthcoming.




Times like these: the self portraits of Rick Amor

27 February – 2 May 2010

An Australian Rembrandt? Across his 40 year career Rick Amor has made dozens of self portraits in every medium. This exhibition brings together, for the first time, Amor’s opus of self discovery as a painter, draughtsman and printmaker. From his earliest teenage efforts to works of the present day, this exhibition showcases the intensity and often brutal honesty of Amor’s journey through the best and worst of times.

 

Artist's talk
Gavin Fry in conversation with Rick Amor
5.30pm Friday 5 March

Join us for a revealing discussion between exhibition curator and artist.

 

Rick Amor in the studio 2009 

 

Rick Amor in the studio 2009

Rick Amor in the studio. Photography by Gavin Fry 2008 




Story Lines: Indigenous works on paper

27 February – 2 May

Including the Crossroads Print Folio of works by artists such as Rover Thomas, Emily Kame Kngwarreye and Judy Watson, this collection-based exhibition celebrates the increasingly pivotal place of printmaking in Aboriginal art making and storytelling.




Summer Exhibitions and Events at the Newcastle Region Art Gallery

 

Throughout summer, the Newcastle Region Art Gallery is running a range of events, with something to appeal to everyone in the family.

 

School Holiday Workshops
10.30 – 12.30 from Tuesday 12 January - Thursday 22 January
2010
Students will work with a range of unusual materials and techniques, creating their own bizarre, outlandish and quirky objects in response to the exhibition QUIRKY: from the collection with activities and discussions specifically designed to address the interests and skills of the group.
Classes are limited to 12 students and are tutored by local artists.
Cost is $15 per student. Bookings are essential.

 

artNRG
January 2010
Every weekend the Gallery hosts art activities as part of its artNRG program, which is sponsored by The Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation. These activities run from 10.30am – 12.30pm on Saturdays and Sundays and are a great family outing. Join in the fun and make something fantastic.
FREE No Bookings required.

 

Quirky Tactile Gallery
January 2010
An added surprise for gallery-goers will be the Quirky Tactile Gallery, where visitors will be able to satisfy the tingling urge in their fingers to handle objects made by contemporary Australian artists, including Kate Rohde, Lionel Bawden and Patricia Piccinini. Great for families and kids-at-heart, the Quirky Tactile Gallery provides a unique opportunity, and will be available during children’s activities held in January.
FREE No bookings required.

 

Drawing workshops in the Gallery
3.00pm Friday 8, 15, 22, 29 January
Following on from the success of the Gallery's still life drawing workshops in late 2009, artist Luke Thurgate will present a series of drawing workshops inside the Gallery.
All materials provided.
FREE

 

Six Summer Flicks
19, 20, 21 and 26, 27, 28 January 2009.
The Newcastle Art Gallery Society’s annual six summer flicks brings the best of world cinema to Newcastle, with films including Tulpan, Departures, Synecdoche, New York and Seraphine. Bookings and tickets at Greater Union Newcastle or via www.greaterunion.com.au/

 

Dive into art at the Gallery
A quirky new work of art has been installed in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery’s courtyard, as part of the Gallery’s newest exhibition Quirky: from the collection. Temporary displacement was created in 2005 while artist Louisa Dawson was studying in Dresden, Germany. The work was transported to Australia and was exhibited Sydney’s Sculpture by the Sea where it was a star of the show.
Temporary displacementis on display at Newcastle Region Art Gallery as part of Quirky: from the collection. It will be available for public viewing until 31 January 2010.

 

Drawing workshop with Jane Lander
6.00 - 8.00pm Tuesday 19 January

Newcastle Region Art Gallery is currently hosting an exhibition by local artist Jane Lander, whose rich approach to painting vividly captures the very essence of life. Lander will lead a workshop for adults using a range of materials and techniques.
The drawing workshop with Jane Lander costs $20. VARANASI: recent paintings of India by Jane Lander is on display at Newcastle Region Art Gallery until 14 February 2010.




Artist's forum

CLASH: contemporary sculptural ceramics

11.00am - 1.00pm Saturday 13 February 2010

 

CLASH: contemporary sculptural ceramics explores contemporary Australian ceramic sculpture. Beautiful and whimsical on the surface, the works of art selected for this exhibition also contain provocations regarding identity, sexuality and violence.

 

Join curator Tobias Spitzer for an overview of the exhibition followed by presentations by artists Tracie Bertram, Myfanwy Gullifer and Gerry Wedd.
Free. For further information, contact Public Programs Officer Penelope Finnigan on 4974 5112.


CLASH: contemporary sculptural ceramics will be on display in the Gallery from 13 February - 18 April 2010.




SACRED SPACES The spiritual and the collection

1 May - 27 June 2010

Contemplative and uplifting, this exhibition drawn from the Gallery’s collection includes important works of art by Marion Borgelt, John Coburn, Margery Edwards, Tim Johnson, Emily Kngwarreye, Gloria Petyarre and Judy Watson. Sacred spaces unveils the world beyond appearances, where matter and spirit converge.

 

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm - 7.00pm
Tuesdays 25 May, 8 & 22 June

$20, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Yoga in the Gallery*
8.30am - 9.30am
Saturday 1 May

Enjoy the Gallery's tranquility and enhance your inner sacred space.
$15

Guided tours
11.00am - 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays

Free

 

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

 

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am - 12.00pm
Wednesday 5 May
Exhibition Curator Rebecca Gresham reflects upon the religious and spiritual in art.
$10 Members/conc., $15 non-members
RSCP: 02 4974 5123 

 

Bookings required for marked events
*RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




SHIGEO SHIGA A focus exhibition

1 May - 27 June 2010

Shigeo Shiga is considered one the most significant living Japanese ceramists. In 1966 he came to Australia where he lived for thirteen years. During this time he experimented with local clay and glazes in response to the Australian landscape and had a profound influence on Australian ceramists. This focus exhibition presents a selection of Shiga’s work from the Gallery’s collection.

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm - 7.00pm
Tuesday 15 June
Shiga aficionado Paul Davis will discuss the work of this important artist.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Guided tours
11.00am - 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

 

Education
General tour available**
Free
 

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am - 12.00pm
Wednesday 2 June
Former Art Gallery Society President Professor Laurie Short discusses the works of ceramist Shigeo Shiga.
$10 Members/conc., $15 non-members
RSVP: 02 4974 5123

 

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




Business as usual at the Gallery

 

With the future of the iconic Laman Street figs uncertain, Newcastle City Council has made a number of recent changes to the ways that people and cars are able to use the street, including closing the road to east bound traffic, and not allowing parking in the street.

 

While these changes have altered the way the public can currently interact with the street, the Newcastle Region Art Gallery and Newcastle City Library are both open for business as usual, with a summer program of exhibitions and activities that makes the cultural hub of the city the perfect place to escape from the summer heat.

 

Current exhibitions at the Gallery include Quirky: from the collection, an exhibition that brings together many of Australia’s most exciting contemporary artists in a single display that explores the different ways that artists use unconventional materials and ideas to make engaging and often humerous work.

 

During the summer, the Gallery also runs a vibrant range of art activities for young people of varying ages, including lower primary, upper primary and secondary students. These activities are a fun way to get kids to engage with the current exhibitions on display. From Tuesday 12 January 2010 – Thursday 22 January 2010, the Gallery will host a series of school holiday workshops, the full details of which are available here.

 

For those looking to visit the Gallery, car parking is available at the rear of the building, and the Gallery is only a short walk from Civic Station, CBD shops and services, and the Darby Street dining and shopping precinct. There is also a drop-off point for visitors to the Gallery and Library at the front of each building.




Dive into art at the Gallery

 

A quirky work of art has been installed in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery’s courtyard. Temporary displacement was created in 2005 while artist Louisa Dawson was studying in Dresden, Germany. The work was transported to Australia and was exhibited in Sydney’s Sculpture by the Sea where it was a star of the show.

 

Temporary displacement is on display in the courtyard at Newcastle Region Art Gallery  until 15 February 2010.




Painters and Perception: four artists of the Hunter

13 February – 18 April

Four artists of the Hunter, Chris Capper, Toby Dupree, John Morris and Mazie Turner, share their painting processes and unique perceptions in this exhibition. Each artist’s individual concerns will be illuminated and a conversation between the works in terms of colour, form and subject matter will be initiated.

 

Artist's forum
5.30 - 7.30pm Friday 19 March
Curator Lisa Slade will chair a panel of the artists in the exhibition.
Free.

 

Painting workshop with Mazie Turner
10.00am - 2.00pm Saturday 27 March
This workshop is for participants who have experience in working with painting processes. The workshop is designed to provide the opportunity for participants to experience fine art quality materials. We will be working with oil paint on different canvas-linen supports, with example of different levels of preparation and process involved. In line with MazieTurner’s current artistic concerns, participants will gain an understanding of colour and painting in layers.
All inclusive cost $60 per participant payable upon registration (Lunch not provided).
Enquiries to Public Programs Officer Penelope Finnigan on 4974 5112




$50,000 Kilgour Prize for Figurative Painting


The winning purse for the Kilgour Prize, Newcastle Region Art Gallery’s biannual award for figurative painting has increased from $30,000 to $50,000 in 2010. The winner of the people’s choice award will also be rewarded, with an increase from $3,000 to $5,000.



The Art Gallery invites artists to submit entries for the 2010 Kilgour Prize for a painting in the form of a figure composition. The most outstanding work as judged by the selection panel will be awarded a cash prize of $50,000 in honour of the late Jack Noel Kilgour. This biannual acquisitive prize is financed by the late Jack Noel Kilgour bequest which is administered by Trust Company Limited.

 

Born in 1900, Kilgour is known for his academic modernism and his subjects include urban landscapes and portraiture. His contemporaries included Jean Bellette, William Dobell, Paul Haefliger, Eric Wilson and his wife Nancy Kilgour, with whom he established a significant artistic partnership. His work is well represented in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection, as well as in significant state and national collections.

 

All entries will be assessed by a panel of three selectors comprising of two independent judges, Ann Lewis AO arts patron, Daniel McOwen Director of Hamilton Art Gallery, Victoria and Ron Ramsey Director of Newcastle Region Art Gallery.

 

Entries close Friday 6 August 2010, with the winner announced Friday 19 November 2010. For further information and full conditions, download the Kilgour Prize 2010 entry form.

 

The Kilgour Prize 2010 will be on display in the Gallery 6 November 2010 - 16 January 2011.

 

KILGOUR PRIZE 2010 ENTRY FORM




Look Hear

 

Look Hear is a weekly event for the month of March where creative professionals take to the stage to present a series of talks and presentations.

 

Every Wednesday evening starting 10th of March, a selection of designers and artists will discuss their creative process, methods and techniques, and the inspirations behind their careers in creativity.


It begins at 5:30pm at the Newcastle Region Art Gallery and it’s free!

 

MARCH 10
Michael Keighery Ceramics
Ben Adams Photography
Newism Web Design/Development

 

MARCH 17
Liam Benson Art/Performance
Simon Goldstein Lamp Design
The National Grid Graphic Design

 

MARCH 24
Finsbury Green Green Printing
Peppermint Magazine Magazine Design

 

MARCH 31
We Buy Your Kids Graphic Design/Illustration
Jane Shadbolt Animation
Mike Watt Illustration
Ron Ramsey Architecture/Art

 

*Program subject to change

 

RSVP on 4974 5100. For more information visit http://www.lookhear.com.au


 

Look Hear is a partnership between Zoocraft and Newcastle Region Art Gallery

Look Hear Zoocraft




Rick Amor and Gavin Fry in conversation
5.30pm Friday 5 March 2010
 
An Australian Rembrandt? Across his 40 year career Rick Amor has made dozens of self portraits in every medium. This exhibition brings together, for the first time, Amor’s opus of self-discovery.
 
Join artist Rick Amor and curator Gavin Fry for a revealing discussion at Newcastle Region Art Gallery, 5.30pm Friday 5 March 2010.
 
Times like these: the self portraits of Rick Amor is on display 27 February – 2 May 2010.
 
 




Colourful conversations within the Gallery

 

Three luminous new exhibitions will come together in conversation as the Newcastle Region Art Gallery opens its newest shows to the public on Saturday 13 February 2010. Highlighting the separate art forms of sculpture and painting, the exhibitions present a colourful, fresh and optimistic display.

 

Striking contradictions and playful provocations are key in the exhibition CLASH: contemporary sculptural ceramics, which explores the current state of contemporary Australian ceramic sculpture.

 

Contained in each work of art in CLASH is a tussle between the materials of the work, its subject matter and it’s meaning. Beneath the whimsical and often beautiful surfaces of these ceramic objects lurk dark ideas, and provocations regarding identity, sexuality and even violence.

 

Curated by Tobias Spitzer, and featuring work by ten important contemporary artists including Danie Mellor, Penny Byrne and Myfanwy Gullifer, CLASH includes work from the Gallery’s collection, and from private and public collections.

The ceramic sculptures in this exhibition are far removed from the traditional perceptions of the medium. By asking us to consider political, sexual and even violent aspects of the world, these delicate and beautiful works take on a life of their own.
Tobias Spitzer, Curator CLASH: contemporary sculptural ceramics

 

A number of the artists on display in CLASH are from the Hunter Region, and in Painters and Perception: four artists of the Hunter, the trend continues, as local artists Chris Capper, Toby Dupree, John Morris and Mazie Turner share their painting processes and perceptions.

 

Each artist has cultivated their own painting style, and in this exhibition, their individual concerns are illuminated within the Gallery space, and a conversation between the works in terms of colour, form and subject matter is initiated.

Every time we exhibit local artists in the Gallery, we are impressed anew by the depth of talent within the Hunter. This exhibition provides audiences with a wonderful chance to get to know the work of some of our local artists more intimately.
Ron Ramsey, Director, Newcastle Region Art Gallery

 

Newcastle Region Art Gallery holds fourteen paintings by Rupert Bunny. In Rupert Bunny Last Fine Days, a selection of these works is displayed. Curated from the Gallery’s collection to complement the Art Gallery of NSW’s major exhibition Rupert Bunny Artist in Paris, Rupert Bunny Last Fine Days celebrates the work of this exceptional Australian artist.

 

All three exhibitions will be opened on 26 February 2010 by Terence Maloon, Curator of Special Projects, Art Gallery of New South Wales.

 

CLASH: Contemporary sculptural ceramics, PAINTERS AND PERCEPTION: Four artists of the Hunter and RUPERT BUNNY LAST FINE DAYS A focus exhibition are on display in the Gallery 13 February – 18 April 2010.

 

For more information, go to Exhibitions.




Rupert Bunny Last fine days
A focus exhibition

13 February – 18 April

Rupert Bunny depicts an arcadia, an idyllic and timeless place of leisure and beauty. This focus exhibition of works from the collection brings together the many aspects of Bunny’s practice including drawings, monotypes and paintings and has been curated to compliment the Art Gallery of NSW travelling exhibition Rupert Bunny, an artist in Paris.

 

Art Historian's talk
6.00 - 7.00pm Tuesday 23 Feburary

As part of the WEA Art Appreciation series, art historian David Thomas will discuss the work of Rupert Bunny.
$20, $15 (conc.)

 




Holiday period opening hours

 

Newcastle Art Gallery has the following opening hours during the holiday period. 
 

Friday 23 December 2011 closed from 12 noon
Saturday 24 December 2011 open
Sunday 25 December 2011 closed - Christmas Day
Monday 26 December 2011 closed
Tuesday 27 December 2011 closed - Boxing Day holiday
Wednesday 28 December 2011 open
Thursday 29 December 2011 open
Friday 30 December 2011 open
Saturday 31 December 2011 open
Sunday  1 January 2012  closed - New Year's Day 
Monday  2 January 2012  closed 


Through out the remainder of January, the Art Gallery is open 10.00am - 5.00pm Monday through Sunday inclusive.

ARTCART, the Art Gallery's free weekly activities for kids, will begin for 2012 on Saturday 7 January 2012.




School Holidays at Newcastle Region Art Gallery

 

Every school holidays the Newcastle Region Art Gallery conducts a range of activities for young people of varying ages (lower primary, upper primary and secondary students), all of which are fun, and provide kids with a great chance to relate to the current exhibitions on display.

 

In January 2010, workshops will focus on works of art from the exhibition QUIRKY: from the collection, on show from 12 December 2009 until 31 January 2010.

 

 

School Holiday Workshops
10.30 – 12.30 from Tuesday 12 January - Thursday 22 January 2010
In these sculpture workshops, students will use a variety of materials to create an environment populated by strange creatures, in response to the exhibition Quirky: from the collection. Activities with discussion specifically designed to address the interests and skills of the group.

Classes are limited to 12 students and are tutored by local artists.
Cost is $15 per student. Bookings are essential.

 

artNRG
December 2009 – January 2010
During the weekends the Gallery will continue to host art activities as part of its artNRG program, which is sponsored by The Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation. These activities run from 10.30 – 12.30 on Saturdays and Sundays and are a great family outing. Join in the fun and make something fantastic.
FREE No Bookings required.

 

Quirky Tactile Gallery
January 2010
An added surprise for gallery-goers will be the Quirky Tactile Gallery, where visitors will be able to satisfy the tingling urge in their fingers to handle objects made by contemporary Australian artists, including Kate Rohde, Lionel Bawden and Patricia Piccinini. Great for families and kids-at-heart, the Quirky Tactile Gallery provides a unique opportunity, and will be available during children’s activities held in January.
FREE No bookings required

 

Enquiries and bookings for all programs: Penelope Finnigan, Public Programs Officer
ph 4974 5112 e pfinnigan@ncc.nsw.gov.au.




New intake of volunteer Gallery Guides at Newcastle Region Art Gallery

 

The Newcastle Region Art Gallery is seeking people with a passion for art who would love to impart their passion to visitors to the Gallery.


Since 1972 a team of Voluntary Guides has assisted Newcastle Region Art Gallery to explain works on exhibition at the Gallery to the public. Hundreds of thousands of visitors have benefited from their work, and developed a love of art.


It is not essential that Voluntary Guide trainees have an academic knowledge of art history or art techniques. Penny Finnigan, the Public Programs Officer at the Gallery says, “We want people who are good communicators, who have an enthusiasm and understanding of art and craft, and have lots of spare time.  People of any age and from all walks of life are encouraged to apply.”


A training program will commence in early December, and run weekly every Monday morning until April 2010, with a three week break over the Christmas - New Year period. The program will cover a wide range of topics including presentation skills, art history and techniques, and guiding diverse audiences. On completion of the program guides are asked to make a commitment to guide at the Gallery for two years.


Information packages and application forms are here available online or from the Gallery, and applications will close on Friday 6 November 2009.

Download the 2009 Volunteer application form. (75.1kb PDF)




2009 Rainbow Visions Festival Launch

Thursday 15 October 2009

6.00pm

 

To launch the 2009 Rainbow Visions Festival artist Deborah Kelly will discuss her work, including Big butch billboard (currently on display at the front of Newcastle Region Art Gallery), her queer 20 year homage to the legendary feminist billboard of 1989 MARIA KOZIC IS BITCH

 

Following the presentation, Deborah will lead encourage the audience to frock up or do provisional drag pose for portraits, so get out your finest wigs and high heels, and join us in the fun.

 

Free entry. Refreshments will be provided. For further information, please contact the Gallery on 4974 5100.




ART APPRECIATION LECTURE SERIES

 

The Newcastle Region Art Gallery continues to host this very popular program in conjunction with WEA Hunter on Tuesday Nights from 6pm – 7pm. A glass of wine and spirited discussion contribute to the relaxed and friendly atmosphere! Enrol in a full term (6 lectures) for $108 – concession $78, or $20 per single lecture, concession $15.
Gallery Society Members are entitled to the concession rate.

 

TERM 4 - 2009

20 October
Misty Moderns: Australian Tonalists 1915 - 1950
Rosalind Hollinrake, researcher of the artist Clarice Beckett, will discuss Beckett’s work in the context of the exhibition Misty Moderns.

 

27 October
Misty Moderns: Australian Tonalists 1915 - 1950
Local artist Luke Thurgate will discuss painting techniques.

 

3 November
Vividly Modern: Sydney Colourists from the collection 1915 - 1950
Curator of the exhibition Lisa Slade will discuss the works on display.

 

10 November
Artist talk: Kate Rohde
Kate Rohde is in Newcastle to complete a short residency at The Lockup, and as part of her program will present this talk at the Gallery.

 

17 November
Varanasi: recent paintings by Jane Lander
Newcastle-based artist Jane Lander will give an insight into her work practice.

 

24 November
New sculpture by Caroline Rothwell
Join artist Caroline Rothwell for a talk on her artistic practice.

 

For more information on events at the Gallery, see What's On.
Download the Art Appreciation enrolment form.




Vividly Modern: Sydney Colourists from the collection 1915 - 1950

9 October - 29 November 2009 

This exhibition showcases the work of artists working in Sydney during the first part of the twentieth century who pursued colour as a key to modernism. Drawn from the Gallery’s collection, artists such as Roy de Maistre, Roland Wakelin, Grace Cossington Smith, Thea Proctor, Margaret Preston, Rah Fizelle and Frank Hinder are today considered the pioneers of Australian modern art.

 

Curator's talk
6.00 - 7.00pm Tuesday 3 November

As part of the WEA Art Appreciation series, Lisa Slade will discuss the curatorial premise and development of the exhibition.
$20, $15 (conc.)




Lines Drawn from a Journey

Poetry group DiVerse respond to Margaret Olley: Life's journey

 

Sunday, 20 September, 2009
12:30pm

 

Lines Drawn from a Journey will introduce audiences to an aspect of Margaret Olley's work that perhaps only a poet can explain. In all works of art, there are inner and outer representations of form, ideas and experiences. DiVerse hope to bring out those inner connections while extending the surface ideas into new stories, new voices.

 

For more information about events at the Gallery, log onto our What's On page.




VARANASI: Recent paintings of India by Jane Lander

7 November 2009 – 14 February 2010

 In 2007 Jane Lander travelled to India and was drawn, like many, to the holy city of Varanasi. One of the oldest cities in the world, Varanasi lies on the Ganges, the river of India which plays a sacred and secular role in daily life. Lander’s experience has inspired a new and vivid body of work and led to the development of a figurative impulse in her practice.

 

Artist's talk
6.00 - 7.00pm Tuesday 17 November

As part of the WEA Art Appreciation series, Jane Lander will discuss the inspiration and techniques for this body of work.
$20, $15 (conc.)

 

Drawing workshop 1
6.00 - 8.00pm Tuesday 19 January

Jane Lander will lead this workshop for adults using a range of materials and techniques.
$20
***This workshop is now fully booked.

 

Drawing workshop 2
6.00 - 8.00pm Tuesday 2 February
Due to popular demand, Jane Lander will lead a second workshop for adults using a range of materials and techniques.
$20

 

Coffee with Art
10.30am Wednesday 3 February
Jane Lander talks about her work, inspired by India's holy city Varanasi.
$10 Gallery Society Members, $15 Non-members.

 

VARANASI: Recent paintings of India by Jane Lander

Jane Lander Varanasi 6.30am (detail) 2009
oil on board 101.0 x 153.0cm
reproduced courtesy of the artist




Still life drawing workshops

 

2.30pm - 3.30pm
Sundays until 4 December 2009

 

This spring, join artist Luke Thurgate in the Gallery for a series of still life drawing classes, inspired by the works of art on display in Misty Moderns: Australian Tonalists 1915-1950.

 

Flowers courtesy of Wilsons' Civic Florist.

 

Still life flowers 2009

Still life flowers inspired by Max Meldrum's Iris in the mirror c1945
oil on composition board purchased 1981
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

 

Still life drawing workshop at the Gallery 2009
Participants in the free still life drawing workshop.

 

 




The Art is Out There

 

Newcastle Region Art Gallery is about to be invaded! Aliens, gnomes and giant creatures are only some of the characters to be found in the Gallery this summer, with the launch of an exhibition that celebrates the bizarre, the outlandish and the strikingly unconventional in art.

 

The aptly-named Quirky: from the collection brings together many of the Australia’s most exciting contemporary artists in a single display that explores the different ways that artists use unconventional materials and ideas to make engaging and often humorous work.

 

The exhibition will be opened on Friday 11 December 2009 by the original perfect party animal, that Prince of Polyester, Bob Downe. Created by broadcaster and entertainer Mark Trevorrow, Downe is one of Australia’s best-loved characters, and his effervescent take on the world perfectly encapsulates the laugh-out-loud mood to be found in this exhibition.

 

Featuring major names in Australian art such as Sean Cordeiro and Claire Healy, McLean Edwards, Hany Armanious, Mikala Dwyer and Juan Davila, Quirky celebrates the unorthodox vision of 26 artists, and proves that the world inside the art gallery can be both delightful and surprising.

 

Many of the artists represented in Quirky are mid-career practitioners who have received both national and international attention. Local artists such as John Turier, Michael Bell and Dallas Bray represent the vanguard of Australian art, developing their distinct visual languages in an otherwise conservative national art scene.

 

An added surprise for gallery-goers will be the Quirky Tactile Gallery, where visitors will be able to satisfy the tingling urge in their fingers to handle objects made by contemporary Australian artists, including Kate Rohde, Lionel Bawden and Patricia Piccinini. Great for families and kids-at-heart, the Quirky Tactile Gallery will run as part of the Gallery’s weekly Artcart activities, and in the school holiday workshops. Group bookings can also be made by contacting Public Programs Officer Penelope Finnigan on 02 4974 5112.

 

Quirky: from the collection, New Sculpture by Caroline Rothwell and Kathy Temin and VARANASI: Recent paintings of India by Jane Lander will be officially opened by Bob Downe 5.30pm Friday 11 December 2009.

 

Quirky: from the collection and the Quirky Tactile Gallery are both on display at the Newcastle Region Art Gallery from 12 December 2009 – 31 January 2010.

Bob Downe will be in the Gallery to open Quirky: from the collection 5.30pm Friday 11 December 2009. 




Quirky: from the collection

12 December 2009 - 31 January 2010

We celebrate the bizarre, the outlandish and the strikingly unconventional in this exhibition including major names in Australian art such as Sean Cordeiro and Claire Healy, Gareth Sansom, McLean Edwards, Hany Armanious, Mikala Dwyer and Juan Davila. The curatorial focus for this collection-based exhibition is how artists explore unconventional materials and ideas to make engaging and often humorous work.

 

Artist's talk
6.00 - 7.00pm Tuesday 10 November

As part of the WEA Art Appreciation series, artist-in-residence at the lock up Kate Rohde will discuss her work.
$10, $15 (conc.)

 

Quirky Tactile Gallery
Are you frustrated that works of art can't be touched in the Gallery? The Quirky Tactile Gallery invites you to handle objects made by artists on display in the exhibition. Great for families and kids-at-heart, the Quirky Tactile Gallery is available to the public as part of the Gallery's weekly Artcart activities, and in the school holiday workshops. 
Every day, Gallery floor attendants will choose a favourite work of art from the Quirky Tactile Gallery, and have this work with them to share with visitors. For those wishing to see the full Quirky Tactile Gallery, group bookings can be made by contacting Public Programs Officer Penelope Finnigan on 02 4974 5112.

Further details below:

Weekends
10.30am - 12.30pm every Saturday and Sunday, as part of the Gallery's regular Artcart program.

School Holiday Workshops
10.30am - 12.30pm Tuesday 12 - Thursday 21 January 2010




The Art Bazaar Arts & Craft Street Market

9.30am - 2.00pm Saturday 5 December 2009

 

On Saturday 5 December 2009, Newcastle Region Art Gallery will once again be participating in the Art Bazaar Arts & Craft Street Market.  Hosted by the Hunter Arts Network and celebrating it's seventh year of operation, the Art Bazaar is a highly anticipated event for both the public and participating stall-holders.

 

Each year, Laman Street is filled with the work of Newcastle's wonderful arts and craft practitioners. Stalls include jewellery, ceramics, paintings and textiles from up-and-coming designers, and with all stock in the Gallery Shop 10% off all day, the Art Bazaar is the perfect place to pick up a unique Christmas gift for that hard-to-buy-for person.

 

As part of the Gallery's regular Artcart program, children visiting the Art Bazaar on the morning of 5 December 2009 will have the chance to participate in a special art activity inspired by Kathy Temin's works of art, currently on display at the Gallery in the exhibition New Sculpture by Caroline Rothwell and Kathy Temin.
Artcart is sponsored by Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation.

  

Art Bazaar Art and Craft Street Market

 

Art Bazaar Art and Craft Street Market
Images from the annual Art Bazaar Art and Craft Street Market
Laman Street, Newcastle

 

Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation logo




Ben Quilty grew up in North Western Sydney. Some of his mates still live there: in shed-land. Others, including Quilty, return to the city’s outskirts from time to time for the rituals of mateship and masculinity: 21sts, buck’s parties and more recently, head-wetting ceremonies. Quilty is both participant and observer in these rites. He is one of the "lost boys", forever in search of youth and action. He is also a husband, father and one of the country’s rising art stars. While Quilty’s subjects are immediate and highly personal, they are also in effect vanitas motifs; symbolic reminders of life’s transience. His beloved 1972 LJ Torana, his renditions of heavy metal t-shirt designs, his Jekyll and Hyde rendering of fellow artist Adam Cullen and even his tender portrait of his baby son Joe, are all pithy reminders of our mortality.

In One for the road (2003), intended as Quilty’s last Torana painting, the LJ collides with the right-hand side of the picture plane, bringing the car and the painting to a violent halt. Doors flung open, the revellers have left the scene and abandoned their prize.
From the publication Ben Quilty 2009 

In October 2009, Germaine Greer discussed this work of Quilty's, in her article Schoolboy doodles? Hardly. Ben Quilty's cars are a glimpse into the male psyche

Ben Quilty was born a year after the Holden LJ Torana was built. The car was his darling, his ticket to ride, his way out of wherever. In One for the Road (the banal but ominous title is typical), the car is trapped by the picture edge, which cuts off the front end. It is violated, empty, front and rear doors open, and lit by a harsh overhead light, as if it were a crime scene. Behind it there is utter darkness. We cannot know what has happened, or if anything has happened.
Germaine Greer, The Guardian, 26 Oct 2009







mimesis

Michael Farrell

as big as dimension or boxes

“   “    “ trombones  “  condoms

can you tell how big you are?

 

i feel like im a policeman

“   “   “   “   “ conception

“   “   “   “   “ quoit

whats it like in the storeroom?

 

im at the pier now drying my feet

 “   “   “   ground “   “   “ mitt

 “   on “   porch   “   “   “ bandaid

have you been to look at the street?

 

meet me at the barn with old bills

“   “   “   “  factory “  the pills

“   “   in  “  bush   “  a rusty kettle

have you any leads?

 

youll find a way out at the top

“   “   “   “   “   “   “  bottom

is a stripe bent a stripe still?

 

my fingers are in the controls

 “     “      “   “   “ mitt

 “    “    “ playing the chords

 “    “    “ swinging “ kettle

 


Michael Farrell won the inaugural Barrett Reid Prize for a poetry manuscript. He is researching a PhD on Australian poetry and masterpieces at the University of Melbourne. His most recent book is a raiders guide, published by Giramondo in 2008.




SELF PORTRAIT WITH EVERLASTINGS

                                      Margaret Olley, 1974

Judith Beveridge

 

A large jug of flowers and one dish

A look that asks what will memory do to us

Three peaches and a summer dress

 

A look that asks what will memory do to us

An open door, early evening light

A large jug of flowers and one dish

 

An open door, early evening light

Three closed notebooks on the desk

A look that asks what will memory do to us

*

Dust on the flame-deepened mirror

We must not practise flattery or fraud

Three closed notebooks on the desk

 

We must not practise flattery or fraud

Four keys, two dropped flowers

Dust on the flame deepened mirror

 

Four keys, two dropped flowers

Three closed notebooks on the desk

We must not practise flattery or fraud.

*

Three peaches and a summer dress

A look that asks what will memory do to us

The bee the colour of the willing hand

 

We must not practise flattery or fraud

An open door, early evening light

Four keys, two dropped flowers

 

The bee the colour of the willing hand

Three closed notebooks on the desk

A look that asks what will memory do to us

 

 

Judith Beveridge (NSW) has published three prize-winning books of poetry, most recently, Wolf Notes. She is the poetry editor of Meanjin. In 2005 she was awarded the Philip Hodgins Memorial Medal for excellence in literature.

Self portrait with everlastings was written by Judith Beveridge in response to Margaret Olley’s Self portrait with everlastings 1974 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.




Daedalus Number 7, 1968

John Tranter

 

Look through my surface: I am as tall as a person,

and I hold multitudes: bodies by the thousand.

 

A shot, and Martin Luther King lies dead.

More gunfire and the Tet Offensive begins,

President Johnson gives up and sinks into history.

In California, Nixon begins to smile.

 

Another gunshot and Robert Kennedy

lies bleeding from the skull. What is America

doing to itself?

                           Fourteen colours tell us

various ways to live, and perhaps to die:

the outer layer a glowing heat shield

flaming through the blue sky;

below, the green water where a boy falls

and drowns, escaping from the labyrinth

where the Athenian architect, his wise father,

toiled and built — wise, but not wise enough:

having escaped from beneath the earth

they climb through air and water

to meet the fire in the sky. It’s 1968:

Yuri Gagarin dies, and Tallulah Bankhead,

Neal Cassady, Weegee and Yvor Winters.

Marcel Duchamp gone, leaving behind

his European arabesque of lies.

 

In March our American friends and allies

incinerate three hundred people

in the village of My Lai. In August

the Russian tanks grind over the cobbles

to enslave Czechoslovakia for the third time

in thirty years. Now Apollo

rises to meet the moon. Welcome to the future.

 

 

John Tranter (NSW) has published several collections of verse including the prize-winning Urban Myths: 210 Poems: New and Selected.

He is the co-editor of the Penguin Book of Modern Australian Poetry and the editor of the free Internet magazine Jacket.

Daedalus Number 7, 1968 was written by John Tranter in response to Col Jordan’s Daedalus Series 7 1968 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.




Definitions

Les Murray

 

Effete: a pose

of Palace cavalry officers

in plum Crimean fig,

spurs and pointed boots,

 

not at all the stamp

of tight-buttoned Guards

executing arm-geometry

in the shouting yards,

 

but sitting his vehicle

listening to tanks change gears

amid oncoming fusiliers

one murmurs the style

 

that has carried his cohort

to this day, and now will test them:

You have to kill them, Giles,

you can’t arrest them.

 

 

Les Murray (NSW) is one of Australia’s leading poets. His work has been published in ten languages. In 1999 he was awarded the Queens Gold Medal for Poetry on the recommendation of Ted Hughes.

Definitions was written by Les Murray in response to Dale Hickey’s Painting 1968 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.




Circa 1927: Realising Belief

Kate Fagan

 

This world of geometry and truth

outruns my hand

in sprawling colour.

 

Awake in constancy

and a vaulted sky

where sun gives shape to limbs

 

I saw you

standing with the jacarandas,

siren of a new present

 

as though feeling

could not be pacified by numbers

and shone replete in things.

 

We are here — only here.

Hill, bucket, river that fills

and empties in a pool at my feet.

 

 

Kate Fagan (NSW) is a writer, editor and musician living in Sydney. Her poetry, interviews and critical essays appear in a range of national and international journals, anthologies and books. Kate is also an established musician and songwriter who has performed and recorded all over Australia and in the UK.

Circa 1927: Realising Belief was written by Kate Fagan in response to Grace Cossington Smith's Trees in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.




Deception Island

Dorothy Porter

 

Thought chokes

where ferns froze.

 

Sea ice stares.

A blinding lizard

of blue-white

sun.

 

Time steams

under rock and sea.

And grinds a grave

of boiled whale bone

to cold black sand.

 

 

Dorothy Porter (VIC) was author of the crime verse novel El Dorado. Her previous works include the novels The Monkey's Mask and Wild Surmise.

Deception Island was written by Dorothy Porter in response to Marion Borgelt’s Saris of Saturn 1986 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.

Sadly, Dorothy passed away on 9 December 2008, from complications from breast cancer.




Summer At Carcoar

Robert Adamson

 

The painter enters         time through the Belubula river,

draws out long             bodies from poplar trees

drenches the air            a naples yellow hue, polishes water flow

to a waxy sheen           until it sings under glowing light

he turns a bend              a joyous curve and quick line

then moves over               paddocks back to the place

where he was born              to embrace ideas of chaos, the accelerating 

particles in his head,              paints original county         as a garden

over scars, sketches notes           on the edges, a wren flicks its tail up

and brush strokes freeze blue           feathers onto surface

the willow pulses salicylic acid            through his idea of pain

the shape of particular hurting             just under skin

on a rock where a currawong            becomes larger than it was

in life and running under                 tissues in a burrow where flecks

of the past gleam through                a green subterranean light

from the Hades of                        childhood’s fears 

a crumbling                            ground of families

here we notice                         the absence of  human figures

and intense English                    trees glow

squat under bird song                   the sun new pain

rabbits hint at movement,                   twitch in grasses

details load themselves                     golden paddocks

made up in the mind,                 river, memory spilling

its ballast onto                       hard  discoveries, the ground opened

though intricate                 eddies in tides of grass

the ten thousand              brush strokes and branches

of thought                   etching themselves under the small sky

feathers               counted each leaf folded

wild                  patterns so right  you believe the painted world

then                  sense an open field believes you    while under ground

around                  the boiling core  Whiteley’s scars

indicate mining                 around 1905 they discovered

uranium here the                  local paper called it ‘the parent of radium’

we sense in the painting’s               glow    stains of undertow

a lash in the black highway                 as it curves outside the frame

we too sense the instinct of                    marsupials, to tunnel down

and glance flowers, mauve bells                  ringing their soft trumpets

then a bee’s arc describing flight,                 a thought becoming amber

 

 

Robert Adamson (NSW) is the publisher of Paper Bark Press, one of Australia’s leading poetry publishing companies.

He is the author of seventeen books of poetry such as The Clean Dark, which won the Victorian and NSW Premiers' prizes and Australia's National Book Council 'Banjo' Award in 1990.

Summer at Carcoar was written by Robert Adamson in response to Brett Whiteley’s Summer at Carcoar 1977 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.







Manolo Ruiz Pipó: private dreams public collections

21 February - 10 May 2009 

Manolo Ruiz Pipó was born in 1929 in Granada, Andalusia in the south of Spain. From the time he was a small child he had a strong interest in drawing. His family was well-to-do and he was sent to exclusive schools in Granada however, he was frequently expelled from the classroom because he neglected his schoolwork preferring to spend his time drawing caricatures of his teachers and classmates.

One night in 1936 during the turbulent prelude to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) Ruiz Pipó’s father was violently taken from his home due to his political beliefs. No one would see him again. In 1940 Pipó’s mother moved her family to Barcelona where they found safety under the protection of her father. In 1942 with the support and encouragement of his grandfather Ruiz Pipó began his formal training in drawing at the Arts and Crafts school La Llotja in Barcelona, the same school where Picasso had been a student.

Two years later Ruiz Pipó received a scholarship to study at San Jordi, the Fine Arts Centre of Barcelona, where his studies included anatomy and dissection; painting in oil tempera, encaustic and fresco; wood and stone carving. At the end of his studies he found work in metallurgy where he would be able to use his skills in sculpture. Ruiz Pipó was employed in an electric lamp factory in Barcelona, where he quickly acquired skills in cutting, welding and working with metal. After four years he gained employment in a restoration and decoration workshop. This work included painting, copying and restoring old masters; sculpting and repairing gold frames; preparing canvases and so on. During this time he continued to draw and sketch prolifically.

Art was held in high regard in Barcelona, therefore it is not surprising that Ruiz Pipó´s works were appreciated there. He was only seventeen years old when he began exhibiting. In 1953, in his early twenties, the Macarron Gallery in Madrid organized a solo exhibition with great success, and the following year he exhibited in Barcelona in Galería Argos alongside Picasso, Juan Gris, Joan Miró, Salvador Dalí and Emilio Grau Sala. At this time Ruiz Pipó felt he needed to leave Barcelona to extend his knowledge and experience of the art world. Following the steps of other artists who moved to Paris in the 1950s, he left Barcelona with a letter of recommendation to visit Picasso. Ruiz Pipó was already familiar with Picasso’s early work as he had seen the Blue and Rose period drawings in Barcelona at the home of art collector Sebastian Junyer. Ruiz Pipó said “In my opinion, this is the first time in art history that someone appears who has destroyed everything so that others might be able to reconstruct it”[i].  

In 1954 Ruiz Pipó arrived in Paris and enrolled in the Georg Printmaking Workshop where he learned the techniques of drypoint, mezzotint, aquatint and lithography, and became a master printmaker. Ruiz Pipó discovered Paris and its museums where he studied the works by Georges de la Tour, specifically his night scenes illuminated by candles. Ruiz Pipó was influenced by the contrast of dark and light, known as chiaroscuro, an element he would later use to express sorrow and solitude in his figures.

In this untitled etching a couple eat in silence, the lamp light illuminates their faces and reveals the mood of the couple; she is pensive, with an empty glass in her hand, while the man eats a frugal dinner. This composition is one seen frequently in modern art in works by Paul Cezanne, Vincent van Gogh and Picasso. In Ruiz Pipó’s etching the couple do not look at each other - the tension of the scene is enhanced by the enigmatic shadow of the man projected on the right hand side of the composition. The bread, wine and eggs on the table are recurrent symbols for Ruiz Pipó. The egg represents the origin of life and for Ruiz Pipó “the transformation of the grain in bread is like a miracle of alchemy and the wine brings intoxication and happiness.”[ii]

It has been said that the southern sensibility of the Andalusian is marked by a strong element of pessimism, the origins of which are to be found in the harsh economic and social conditions of the south. In addition, the strong influence of Oriental and Arabic culture, specifically the Mudejar, has contributed to this cultural mix. In contrast to pessimism, the Andalusian spirit embraces joy, and according to Art Historian Armando Grinesi this spiritual content gives life to the whole of Manolo Ruiz Pipós pictorial work, and particularly to the drawings from which the ten lithographs Man Enslaved were extracted. Ruiz Pipó places his “slave” characters in a reality, one dominated by the extremes of light and dark and by the feeling of entrapment. As the Milanese critic Marco Valsecchi expresses, “by recalling cultural supra-worlds, by dreams, by boundless ideals and mental ironies Ruiz Pipó creates an atmosphere of quiet delirium and immobility.”[iii]

Like Diego Velazquez, Joaquin Sorolla, Francisco Goya and Picasso, Ruiz Pipó follows the Spanish tradition of figurative art with still life, nudes, beach scenes, characters drawn from drama as well as tauromaquia (bullfighting). It is not surprising that as a Spanish artist Ruiz Pipó included the bull in his iconography. An etching titled Les Prétresses (The Goddesses) shows a placid bull surrounded by three female nudes. The crown of leaves worn by one of the women gives this image a classical reference. For centuries, the bull has been a symbol of strength, tenacity, virility and power, represented in this image by the elaborate and dense crosshatching of the bull while the female figures are represented with elegant and simple lines. This work also recalls Picasso’s Minotaur series.

Women were a favourite subject for Ruiz Pipó, appreciated for their sensuality and for their fertility. He considered women to be pleasure givers and lovers, however he also expressed tenderness between women. In Ruiz Pipó’s paintings women manifest a symbolic connection with both water and the earth, as depicted in The Rocks and Eva Marina which were both painted in Newcastle. Voluptuous forms blend with the landscape without losing any of their sensuality.

The influence of Picasso on Ruiz Pipó seems inevitable. El Pañuelo (the handkerchief), has a strong reference to Picasso´s oil painting The Race 1922 where two women run along the beach holding hands. Their voluptuous bodies form a triangular composition which Ruiz Pipó reverses in his composition El Pañuelo. Like Picasso, women for Ruiz Pipó were his primary muse. He portrayed them as Mediterranean goddesses - exuberant, curvaceous and as the Italians say “fruta di terra”.

Ruiz Pipó described himself as a “sedentary nomad”. He was a reluctant traveller who nevertheless embraced opportunity and his talents, in particular his skilled portraits, took him to London in 1958 where he was invited to paint the portraits of a high society Englishman and his daughters. This commission led to more work and he began to share his time between Paris and London until 1962. In 1966 he was invited to exhibit in Florence at the Arno gallery. He fell in love with Italy and in 1969 moved to Bologna with his family, where his son Orlando was born. Orlando is depicted in Orlando y la Copa de Cristal (Orlando and the Crystal Glass)painted in 1973.

The theme of mother and child was a leitmotiv for Ruiz Pipó and three maternity paintings are included in this exhibition. The use of red for Ruiz Pipó was an evocation of Bologna, as he stated, “Bologna is where my colours have humanized”. Sensuous, generous and red, Bologna for Ruiz Pipó was the cradle of artistic creation. He used Red Sienna and Carmine to create the maternity paintings, where both mother and child are reduced to stylised bodies composed of circles and ovals. In Armonía en Rojo, the composition of mother and child is reminiscent of the classical tradition of the Madonna.

Pierrot Lunaire is a recurrent subject in Ruiz Pipó’s paintings. Pierrot, the sad clown dressed in white, originates in the 15th century when groups of traveling performers known as Commedia dell'arte travelled and performed throughout Italy. Ruiz Pipó portrays Pierrot immersed in a surrealistic atmosphere where the influence of Giorgio de Chirico is keenly felt in the classical architecture, the use of shadows and the often unlikely juxtaposition of figures and objects. Pierrot evokes the dream state and for the Surrealists the exploration of the unconscious mind, pioneered by Sigmund Freud, which was a way to liberate the imagination from the dominance of reason. In his untitled watercolour Ruiz Pipó uses the Surrealist device of metamorphosis to show the roots of a tree transforming into the face of a sleeping woman.

In Ruiz Pipó we have an artist who condenses the artistic influences of his time and reflects the cultural temperament of both his country of birth and the myriad locations to which he travelled.

…………………………………………….

This exhibition Manolo Ruiz Pipó: private dreams, public collections is a testimony to the philanthropy of Dr. William Bowmore (1909-2008) who endeavoured to broaden the cultural life of Newcastle. The two men met in Milan where Bowmore purchased several paintings, drypoints and lithographs by Ruiz Pipó. The two men shared a love of art and a mutual appreciation for music. Bowmore and Ruiz Pipó developed a strong friendship and travelled together throughout Italy visiting the Pompeii frescoes. Bowmore invited Ruiz Pipó to Australia and organized two exhibitions of his work in Newcastle. From 1972 to 1975 the artist visited Australia several times and Bowmore’s circle of friends and relatives were introduced to Ruiz Pipó, with many becoming collectors of his work.

I would like to extend my appreciation to all of the lenders - to Maitland Regional Art Gallery, Muswellbrook Regional Arts Centre, Joseph Abraham, Lorna Denham, Gerald Gamble, Dr Peter Hendry, Mark Raschke, and the Kalokerinos family. This exhibition also pays tribute to the late Jocelyn Kalokerinos whose recent donation of two major paintings by Ruiz Pipó, along with the profound generosity of Dr William Bowmore, provided the momentum for this exhibition.


 

Dr. Susana Enríquez

January 2009



[i] Laurence Buffet-Challié and Patricia Bailly Manolo Ruiz Pipó p9

[ii] ibid p22

[iii] Armando Grinesi Ten lithographs by Manuel Ruiz Pipó, Art Prints, Il Centro catalogue, published by Nuovo Sagitario 1974




Art treasure trove gifted to Newcastle

 

On Monday September 29 2008 Ann Lewis AO officially donated millions of dollars worth of art to key institutions in New South Wales. Newcastle Region Art Gallery (NRAG) is one of the recipients, reflecting Lewis’ history of supporting the Gallery. The Museum of Contemporary Art also received key works from Lewis’ collection.

 

NRAG received artworks valued in excess of four million dollars. These works were selected by Ann Lewis in consultation with the Director to best augment the Gallery’s collection. Among the treasures to be gifted to Newcastle are important works by Australian artists including Ralph Balson, Fiona Hall, Janet Dawson, Rosalie Gascoigne and Bronwyn Oliver.

 

The most significant treasure to make its way to Newcastle is the painted dining room ceiling of Lewis’ Rose Bay home. The ceiling was painted by John Olsen in 1964 and is one of only a handful of ceiling paintings made by Olsen.

 

John Olsen, arguably the country’s greatest living painter, was born just around the corner from the Gallery in Dawson St” says Gallery Director Ron Ramsey. “Earlier this year the Gallery put together the first public exhibition of Olsen’s unique ceiling works which was received with tremendous enthusiasm, so to be gifted one of these works is just extraordinary and we are absolutely thrilled with Ann Lewis’ generosity.”

 

Biographical information on Ann Lewis

Ann Lewis has played a key role in nurturing support for Australian art locally and oversees. She has donated and loaned work to the country’s major art institutions including the National Gallery of Australia, Art Gallery of NSW, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art and Queensland Art Gallery.

 

She is currently the Vice President of the International Council of the Museum of Modern Art, New York where she has been a member since 1972. She also serves on the Boards of the National Gallery of Australia, Artbank and the Mercantile Mutual Foundation. She has held a range of senior arts positions including Chair of the Visual Arts Board of the Australia Council from 1980 until 1983 and Chair of the Australian Exhibitions Touring Agency from 1990 to 1996.

Ann Lewis was awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree by the University of Sydney in 2001 and is the recipient of a Member in the Order of Australia Medal (AO) for her outstanding service to the arts.


 

Ann_Lewis_gift

Ann Lewis AO in her Rose Bay Home, featuring John Olsen's ceiling painting Sea Sun of Five Bells 1964




9 Shades of Whiteley

14 February - 26 April 2009 

Brett Whiteley’s talent and energy are legendary in Australian art. This Art Gallery of New South Wales travelling exhibition traces the nine phases of the artist’s life and career – from his earliest painting Self portrait at sixteen 1955 to Port Douglas, far North Queensland 1992, painted just a few months before his death. Works by Whiteley from the Gallery’s collection will augment the travelling exhibition.

 










This material spirit

Jill Jones

 

He made this lying down: reaching up

with close and distance in the origin

bird flame, salamander sun

amoeba and embryo, the artist’s circle

and begins.

 

As helpless and astounding life begins

with the cell, its own chaos acres.

Then question, the snake, marks a wall

approaches writing through womb, tentacle

sperm and flume we come from

this matter whose arrow of love can’t be predicted.

 

Earth bubbles escape into whale call

the fish’s tear, where it’s all going, mouth helix

to a child’s handprint, a tongue (red)

into wormholes, universes, sacs

of blue birth passage.

 

Perhaps sea felt like this as colours

crawled out and made ochres in the sun.

Within water’s eye is release, tasting

the first connection of salt in motion

and one-ness, then the sun’s line, letting it run

as fast as it can flow.

 

Trails mix trails evolving a dark script

so many stories in high-red waters, winding

seas whose issue bursts on topographies

lines and loops of existence, the way

numbers form then become invisible.

 

Tangent suns and filaments merge

a fiery drama you might want to escape

whose threads of substance aren’t inevitable

whose parallels don’t hold forever.

Can we look at what is over here, or there?

DNA to infinity, dotted through coral stars.

 

Some crazy life is running with odd grimaces

and grins, hands in the air, a sting in the tail

as bloodskin feels the air with tongues

and questions are overwritten

to disappear, animal within animal.

 

 

Jill Jones (NSW) is a poet and writer who lives in Sydney. Her work has been widely published in most of the leading literary periodicals in Australia as well as in a number of print and online magazines in New Zealand, Canada, the USA, Britain and India.

Her latest book Broken/Open was shortlisted for The Age Poetry Book of the Year in 2005 and the Kenneth Slessor Poetry Prize in 2006.

This material spirit was written by Jill Jones in response to John Olsen’s Life burst 1964 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.




Settler Cemetery

Peter Minter

 

The first thing we see

on entering the settler cemetery

where the dead still lie in the lie

of their country, under grass

long dead with no rain

 

is the cracked black earth

and the ash black shoulders of stones

toppled in random stacks,

that row and that

in the shadow of bones, white serifs

wedged out of sight.

You ask me, where is my face,

in the earth, in the night,

the fire alive in the tree?

 

 

Peter Minter (NSW) is a poet, editor and reviewer, and with Lisa Slade is co-curator of the Poets Paint Words exhibition. His Empty Texas won the 2000 Age Poetry Book of the Year, and he was poetry editor of Meanjin from 2000-2005. His latest book is blue grass.

Settler Cemetery was written by Peter Minter in response to Imants Tillers’ White Aborigines (No. 2) 1983 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.




The Botanist in Search of the Yarrow Hollow

Luke Davies

In the beginning the world was holly. It seemed like such a good idea.

The remote details were intriguing. Besides, he was old and rare

as quite anyone in a wide circle around him. His skin

was sheathed with blood, was a peeling of pain, for the journey

over the bog to the one true tree. He was flayed by life,

he was wary of the yabby towers—mind you that was long before

he was dropped in by chopper. Examining the dead and done.

Dead leaves, dead chromosomes, all dead, all good and gone.

He walked across a wide whin land, dead desolation too.

Even the buttongrass, godless and sterile: he fell face first but was

learning to laugh. Depleted earth. The remote details were intriguing.

He yearned for the youth of the planet. He shouldered

through the horizontal. Even the wind was insane.

He was always slotting into these epic journeys; it had become

like a habit, a frisson. The elephants to Carthage, to King’s holly, and,

give or take forty thousand years, the radiocarbonated fizz

of standing outside oneself. Some called it history. He found it easier

to think of everything as paleobotany. He knew in any case that metaphor

trumped narrative. But even the wind was insane. Nonetheless

it was the not-so-dead-after-all that held him the most—

most rapt, that is. Where all went thrivingly. Look and remember:

this or the pines. He was flayed by life, but the yarrow towers

they comforted him: monumental form in the leaf, make that elemental;

he looked and remembered, collected, selected, dismissed, re-selected.

Again and again a beginning, though he sank into sucking mud,

though he slogged under cloud through the bog, though the rubble and refuse

from the ridge-line rained down. The orange-bellied parrot preened

and the one true tree lit up. To say nothing of God.

Luke Davies was born in Sydney in 1962. He has worked variously as a truck driver, teacher, and journalist. His collection of poetry Absolute Event Horizon was shortlisted for the 1995 Turnbull Fox Phillips poetry prize.

The Botanist in Search of the Yarrow Hollow was written by Luke Davies in response to Peter Atkins’ Leaf pattern 1994 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection




Afternoon

Shoalhaven River, Afternoon II

Martin Harrison 

 

A final thought might be

how

after sex with you

I want the light to be permanent

 

some utterly sun-drowned afternoon

where intense, golden drifts

freeze across the ranges

 

“utterly” because

of what is open, airy, so exposed

 

with a long drift of time and distance

starting in the gap

 

every gesture’s a response to light

every thought speaks to its change

with a sense of what happens

when dreaming, perhaps inland along a river:

 

the ripple of

a single moment

dissolving a broad hill slope

 

which just as it

melts in water

stays still enough,

trance-like,

to engage us

in our love

 

*

 

Yet if you look back

again –

            just once –

                               it seems

 

as if I’ve spent a lifetime

staring at the same thing

again and again –

some Mont St-Victoire,

some cracked white kitchen jug –

hoping this way to understand

the way we see

or, perhaps, to see beyond

the what and how of sight,

 

so the still shape of breast

and ridge, of

scrub-marked slope, of

threaded white branches

poking through the mix –

all this

shimmers with untouched

untouchable

sun-glare -

 

and the first thing

which comes to me

is loveliness

and the next’s

 

an everywhere mirrored

stillness:

a bush-covered incline

held just as it does its eternal act

of arriving, moving through

 

to make us be

immortal watchers

 

older than centuries

who unearth hill-sides from sky,

spear-heads from air,

and rock-ledged fringes of deep water

 

from our own minds’

movement

 

 

Martin Harrison (UK/NSW) started publishing poems in London in the mid-70s. His work has been published in Australia, New Zealand, the USA and Great Britain and has recently appeared in Chinese translation.

Afternoon was written by Martin Harrison in response to Arthur Boyd’s Shoalhaven River afternoon (the four times of day: afternoon: version II) 1983 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.




Summer at Carcoar 

 

One of the first works to grace the walls of this gallery when it was opened in 1977 was Brett Whiteley’s Summer at Carcoar 1977.

Arguably the Gallery’s most loved painting, Whiteley was commissioned to produce this work by former Newcastle resident collector Dr William Bowmore who then gifted the work to the Gallery. Radiating with the heat of an Australian summer, this massive painting condenses all of Whiteley’s stylistic trademarks and influences. In 1978 Whiteley won the Wynne Prize with Summer at Carcoar, along with the prestigious Archibald and Sulman prizes in the same year. Today, this painting is one of the most valuable works of art in the collection.




In The Plastic Menagerie Sean Cordeiro and Claire Healy continue their conceptual and material interrogation of habitat. Part of a generation who can only dream of home ownership, their work questions our attachment to place and property. In this work they have collaborated to construct a nest of museum showcases or vitrines and housed within each vitrine is an animal shaped inflatable toy. Among the menagerie, a wide-eyed Orca whale and a smiling crocodile speak of our incessant taming of the world and our absurd tendency to anthropomorphise even the most exotic beast. The vitrines are stacked on top of each other in a manner more reminiscent of pet shop chaos than the order of a natural history museum. This controlled chaos connects The Plastic Menagerie to their earlier work featuring the act of deconstructing and reconstructing familiar objects within the gallery space.

Each vitrine in The Plastic Menagerie is made from laminated pine, the type of material used to make inexpensive, ubiquitous furniture. Rather than the elegant handcrafted vitrines of the museum, these ‘storage solutions’ have a certain DIY appeal. Is it possible that the work is supplied as a ready to assemble animal menagerie where the animals can be inflated and safely housed within their flat-pack vitrines?

Installed within a manner of minutes, this menagerie offers a portable and compact living solution to zoo overcrowding. The Plastic Menagerie also offers a possible panacea to curators and collectors who can assemble at will their own museum collections. But what of the decline of the species wrought by slow leakages and sagging plastic? Are these creatures doomed to become deflatables? Unlike the broken glass animals that symbolise a young woman’s awakening to the perils of the world in Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie, this plastic fantastic inflatable animal kingdom offers a certain resistance to reality.




At six metres in length Dani Marti’s triptychis a luminous, formidable apparition. Industrial polymer ropes in fluorescent yellow and orange are woven together using a range of weaving techniques. Before training as a painter Marti spent time in his birthplace of Barcelona learning traditional tapestry techniques. Stretched over sturdy wooden frames the three panels that make up George hover between painting and relief sculpture, depending on your vantage point. The undulating shimmering weft and barely visible nylon warp refer to the woven canvas support of traditional paintings.

As the title suggests, Marti’s tactile works are often associated with particular people in the artist’s life and can be described as non-representational portraits. They refuse to portray a subject in the manner of conventional portraiture however they emanate with a sense of character and the feel of personality.




Pink poem:

Keri Glastonbury

 

“Beneath the male gaze, the male nose”

                                                                   Ted Nielsen

 

There’s an internet radio station streaming a genome of my favourite music,

which is, surprisingly, alt.country (perfect, as you cultural role-play Tess of the

D’Ubervilles in emo glasses).

 

I imagine you waking up to a massive thatch of black hair/red lipstick smudge/ripped up

‘Let’s go to bed’ t-shirt, then throwing on a green leather 6 quid coat

and transforming into Amanda Plumber; rousing on me for, at best, aspiring to

middlebrow arts administrator chic.

 

Premenstrual, you’re a walking sack of margarine in the fields of Devon.

Wanting to sever that somatic circuit—talk to the stick, body is on hiatus.

Sitting on a milking stool in a muddy slip.

 

Tick, rug. Tick, chair. Tick, floorboards. But bereft of flesh.

 

 

An email mash up from correspondence between the poet and Sarah-Jane Norman (in the UK).

 

 

Keri Glastonbury (NSW) is a lecturer in creative writing at the University of Newcastle. She completed a Doctorate in Creative Arts at the University of Technology, Sydney in 2005 called "Shut up, nobody wants to hear your poems".

Pink poem was written by Keri Glastonbury in response to John Brack’s The pink carpet 1970 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.




Correct Weight

Jaya Savige

  

Camouflaged against the smug mahogany

of the Red Lion in Westminster,

the sitting member drains his knockoff Stella –

beyond the bronze Churchill disingenuous

tourists mumble hymns for free

         entry to the abbey – and wonders

whether in Australia, like the constellations,

everything is upside down: a world replete

with Swift’s Houyhnhnms, where beasts scold

men – centaurs gripping Lapiths by the throat –

         rather than the other way around.

It’s said their beer is best served icy cold.

 

Glancing like Orpheus at the underground,

something in him clicks like a starting gate

when the riders are finally set: how being

clenched between the buttocks of a thoroughbred

         could be a kind of noble anonymity.

 

In such a place, one might take the features

of their betters – equine face, parted mane,

shoulders sloping gracefully beneath

a shiny coat – and, despite the yahoos reveling

in their fetters, or perhaps because of them,

come also to love the raw heat

of being flogged toward the post;

         or if not, enough at least to stay in it

to the last, for the will to not diminish,

to leap out of the ground and take it by a nose

in a controversial photo finish –

         and see off the protest at the weigh in.
 

 

Jaya Savige (QLD) is currently writer-in-residence at the B.R. Whiting Library, Rome. His recent collection of poems, Latecomers (UQP 2005) was the winner of the 2006 Kenneth Slessor Prize (NSW Premier's Prize for Poetry).

Correct Weight was written by Jaya Savige in response to William Dobell’s Portrait of a strapper 1941 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.




Journal

John Kinsella

 

     So gnarl, press on,

     not weaken befores or afters,

  make haven in waste, gazette

     extinctual scan as chips

  off older blocks — riverviews

  unbecome a surge of ghosts in trunks,

blotch of scruples in canopy, sky

 

     as blue as eyes

     streaked white once were —

  glowing finance of our backers,

     corrugated Knights Templar,

  mountless roughriders, press on

  in khaki flow, jut-jaw belligerence,

as declared — scientific — garrulous

 

     it is said of us,

     heroicise our brutals?

  Alone, trudging solipsists, grace

     and glide arterials, ford the aura

  silted bed, mirror narratives flat, press on,

  reflectionless, prised of shadow, waver

in flesh: let them come on, and on,

 

     shoulder arms, fall

     divided where wagons

  fail to circle — no fear! unslung

     metal backbone, shudder

  riparian swathes of pollen,

  our drive to mine a visage: seams

of fauna riven deep to characters. Press on.

 

 

John Kinsella (WA) is a poet whose most recent volumes of poetry includes America: A Poem. His poetics volume Disclosed Poetics: Beyond Landscape and Lyricism will be published in June 2007.

Journal was written by John Kinsella in response to Albert Tucker’s Explorers fording the river 1958 in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.



















Salon

16 May - 2 August 2009

In 1978, when the new Gallery building was opened, Daniel Thomas AM wrote a seminal piece in Art and Australia about the national importance of the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection. Thirty years on, Thomas has been invited to select his favourite paintings from the collection, which will be displayed in a 'salon hang' for the National Museums Australia conference.




Logo: Fiona Hall: Force Field

 

1 August - 27 September 2009

The MCA’s most successful exhibition ever comes to Newcastle! Fiona Hall: Force Field is an in-depth survey of the work of Australian artist Fiona Hall from the 1970s to the present, produced collaboratively between the MCA and City Gallery Wellington.

 

Exhibition organised and toured by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia and City Gallery Wellington, New Zealand.

Logo: MCA Logo: City Gallery Wellington
 

Resources

Fiona Hall: Force Field Education Kit (807.5kb PDF)

City Gallery Wellington video link

Fiona Hall: Sketch (Activity Journals for Kids by Contemporary Artists) (9.9mb PDF)




Stone Country - Salt Water

1 August - 27 September 2009

Showcasing the Gallery’s significant collection of early Arnhem Land bark paintings as well as recent acquisitions, Stone Country – Salt Water will also draw on major private collections. Curated by Michelle Corbett, this exhibition will include work by established artists such as John Mawurndjul, Narritjin Maymuru, Gulumbu Yunupingu and Lofty Bardayal, as well as emerging artists Melinda Getyin, George Dangi and Joe Djembangu.




The Kilgour Prize 2008

This bi-annual acquisitive painting prize is financed by the Jack Noel Kilgour bequest. The Prize encourages innovative figurative painting by Australian artists and in 2008 the $30,000 acquisitive prize was awarded to Dallas Bray, for his work Burning Bush.

A People's Choice award of $3,000 was awarded to Michael Bell, for his painting Dog Beach.

 

Dog Beach 2009

Michael Bell Dog Beach 2008

oil on canvas, 180.0 x 270.0

 

The Kilgour Prize is a bi-annual event. Entry forms for the Kilgour Prize 2010 will be available in early 2010, with the exhibition opening in November 2010.







 

Misty Moderns : Australian Tonalists 1915-1950

 

9 October - 29 November 2009

This is the first major exhibition to tell the story of Australian Tonalism; a movement championed by the influential and often controversial painter Max Meldrum, which reached its peak during the inter-war period. Developed by the Art Gallery of South Australia the exhibition includes work by Clarice Beckett, Colin Colahan, Percy Leason, Polly Hurry and John Farmer. Paintings drawn from the Gallery’s own holdings from this period will also be included.

Read Tracey Lock-weir's essay on Misty Moderns here.

 

Still life drawing workshops
2.30 - 3.30pm Sundays during October and November
Join artist Luke Thurgate for these free still life drawing classes. Flowers courtesy of Wilsons' Civic Florist.
Free.

 

Coffee with Art
10.30am Wednesday 4 November

Ron Ramsey, Director discusses Misty Moderns, illuminating selected Australian tonalists.
$10 Gallery Society members, $15 non-members.


 

Art Gallery of South Australia Visions of Australia artsNSW Newcastle City Council




Margaret Olley: Life’s journey

15 August - 25 October 2009

This exhibition will provide a unique insight into the world around Margaret Olley from the early 1950s to the 1970s through her watercolours and pen and ink studies, tracing the places in which Olley has lived and the cities throughout the world to which she has travelled. This exhibition developed by The University of Queensland Art Museum will include previously unexhibited works on paper, sketch books and archival material drawn from national, state, private collections, and the artist’s private collection.

Go to the University of Queensland's podcasts and vodcasts for Margaret Olley: Life's journey.

 

Note: Entry fees apply for this exhibition. 
Adult: $5
Concession, Gallery Foundation and Society Members: $2
Pre-booked school groups: Free

 

Margaret Olley arriving in Port Swettenham, Kuala Lumpur, Maylasia 1969

Margaret Olley arriving in Port Swettenham, Kuala Lumpur, Maylasia 1969
(Photograph supplied courtesy of Mrs Wilma Knight)

 

Thérèse Rein and Margaret Olley at the opening of Margaret Olley: Life's journey

Thérèse Rein and Margaret Olley at the opening of Margaret Olley: Life's journey
14 August 2009

 




Gallery A Sydney 1964 - 1983

9 May - 19 July 2009

it was a very exciting time. They had this little gallery in Gipps Street Paddington and I mean it was the art scene.

Charles Reddington, 2008

Gallery A was a private gallery of contemporary art that began in Melbourne in 1959. The gallery’s original director, Max Hutchinson (1925–1999), was involved initially in furniture and industrial design. Under the influence of the sculptor Clement Meadmore, Hutchinson began to exhibit contemporary Australian art, particularly abstract painting and sculpture, in his Melbourne showrooms - the origin of Gallery A.

Max Hutchinson wished to expand Gallery A to Sydney. He formed a partnership with fellow directors, Ann Lewis, Rua Osborne and later Rowena Burrell, and opened the gallery in November 1964. Gallery A Sydney was located at 21 Gipps Street Paddington in a colonial Georgian cottage that was refurbished as a simple, white-walled gallery.

This exhibition portrays the period that Gallery A operated in Sydney through selected aspects of its history. These include Mike Brown’s challenge to censorship with his 1965 exhibition, Paintin’ a-go-go!; the anti-Vietnam War demonstration, Arts Vietnam of 1968; the influential series of Ralph Balson memorial exhibitions; and Peter Kennedy’s experimental installations of the early 1970s.

The selection of art works has also been shaped by a wish to evoke varied responses to the temperament of Sydney during this period – to its gathering places at harbour-side beaches and public squares, its pastimes, architecture and performing arts.

Gallery A Sydney closed in September 1983, after approximately two decades of exhibitions that fostered abstraction in painting and sculpture, and introduced to its audience new artists and innovations in artistic form and style.

John Murphy

 

Virginia-Cuppaidge-Installation-1974 

Virginia Cuppaidge installation at Gallery A Sydney 1974


This exhibition is the first in depth survey of Sydney's most controversial and ambitious gallery and will feature artists including Ralph Balson, Virginia Cuppaidge, Janet Dawson, Bert Flugelman, Rosalie Gascoigne, Frank Hinder and Michael Johnson amongst others. The exhibition is a collaboration between Newcastle Region Art Gallery and Campbelltown Arts Centre, curated by John Murphy. 





Hit the Bottle

17 April - 10 May 2009

Comprised of hundreds of recycled water bottles Watermark is the creative outcome of the HIT THE BOTTLE collaboration between 1233 ABC Newcastle, Hunter Water and Newcastle Region Art Gallery. Inspired by the 1233 ABC Breakfast team, radio listeners received a non-plastic refillable water bottle for every five plastic bottles delivered to the ABC’s Newcastle headquarters.

Sydney-based Jane Gillings and Townsville-based Alison McDonald, along with a small team of dedicated volunteers, have transformed the bottles over just four days, into this sculptural installation. Both artists specialise in working with recycled materials, with plastic being their preferred medium. The marine creatures that make up this unnatural reef are crafted using scissors, a heat gun and cable ties.

Each year Australians, who have unlimited access to clean and safe drinking water, buy more than 300 million bottles of water. The production of these bottles generates greenhouse gases and unnecessary pollution. Some of the used bottles end up in the ocean and are consumed by whales, turtles and seabirds who mistake the bottles for food. Others end up trapped in a giant whirlpool of plastic detritus in the northern Pacific Ocean, twice the size of the American continent, known as Pacific plastic soup. By titling this installation Watermark the artists are drawing our attention to the mark we leave on the planet and asking us to re-think our water consumption.

Artist-assistants: Bree Sanders, Angela Scrymgour, Lisa Slade, Len Tesoriero and Cy, Morgana, Shen and Silva Osaki.







Hit the Bottle with 1233 ABC Newcastle

This is your chance to do your bit for the environment, courtesy of the 1233 Breakfast team – from Monday 30 March, drop five plastic water bottles into the water tank in the foyer of the 1233 ABC Newcastle studios (Cnr Wood and Parry Streets) and receive a complementary metal, refillable water bottle.

 

Thanks to Hunter Water and the Newcastle Region Art Gallery, your old plastic water bottles will be transformed into a marine sculpture at the Gallery which will tour the Hunter; finally to be auctioned off to raise money for an ocean cleaning project.

 

Artists Jane Gillings and Alison McDonald, who specialise in creating artwork out of recycled materials will be at the Art Gallery from Friday 17 April – Monday 20 April creating the artwork out of the donated plastic water bottles. Children will be involved through the Gallery’s Art Cart and school holiday program and members of the public are welcome to visit the Gallery and view the work in progress.

 

Once the artwork is created, it will be on display at the Art Gallery and finally tour the Hunter in the foyer of various work places.

 

To maximise the environmental value of this campaign, the artwork will be auctioned off at the completion of its tour to raise money for an ocean cleaning project.

 

ABC Station Manager Phil Ashley-Brown said that after the success of the ‘Get Tanked’ campaign in 2008, the station felt even more could be done to raise awareness and to instigate action.

 

“Last year four families competed to prove just how effective we all can be in minimising water consumption. The winners were rewarded with the supply and installation of a home water tank, and we are very keen to continue this emphasis on the environment.

 

“Plastic water bottles are a very topical issue. The 1233 Breakfast team is keen to tackle these types of problems head on by educating their listeners on areas of interest to the community. If we can also involve them in a fun and interactive event, then the benefits are generally longer term and more effective.

 

“We are fortunate to be working with the Newcastle Region Art Gallery and Hunter Water on this project. Support from the business and arts community only strengthens the message.

 

“Combining water conservation with pollution control and resolving it in a creative way seemed a very logical next step and we would welcome everyone’s involvement”, Phil said.

 

Presented by 1233 ABC Newcastle, Newcastle Region Art Gallery and Hunter Water 1233 ABC Newcastle, Newcastle Region Art Gallery and Hunter Water present Hit the Bottle

School groups "hit the bottle" at Newcastle Region Art Gallery.

 

 

 

For more information and interview opportunities:

Visit:

abc.net.au/newcastle and click on Competitions and Events

Contact:

Phil Ashley-Brown, Local Radio Manager 1233 ABC Newcastle 0417 416 546

Angela Scrymgour, Marketing Manager 1233 ABC Newcastle 0417 711577

Lisa Slade, Curatorial Consultant, Newcastle Region Art Gallery 0249745101










The World in Painting

21 February - 10 May 2009

From domestic interiors to dream-like landscapes, eight of Australia's distinguished artists present visions of their worlds. Curated by Zara Stanhope and developed by Heide Museum of Modern Art in Melbourne, The World in Painting features works by Gordon Bennett (also known as John Citizen), Amanda Davies, Dienca Georgetti, Raafat Ishak, James Morrison, Boxer Milner Tjampitjin, Nancy Naninurra Napanangka and Elizabeth Newman.




Ocean to Outback: Australian landscape painting 1850-1950

8 November 2008 - 1 February 2009

An exhibition from the National Gallery of Australia documenting a century of Australian landscape and tracing the development of the national collection from the colonial to modernist preoccupations.

Explore the National Gallery of Australia's Ocean to Outback website.

Beach to Bush: Australian landscape painting from the collection 1850-1950

Running in conjunction with Ocean to Outback was Beach to Bush: Australian landscape painting from the collection 1850 - 1950. Drawn from the Gallery’s extensive painting collection, this exhibition celebrates our perennial fascination with both the beach and the bush and includes a selection of local vistas.
 





Poets Paint Words II

16 May - 5 July 2009

Australia's most celebrated poets have been commissioned to write a poem inspired by a painting in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection. This year's line up of poets includes Judith Bishop, Michael Brennan, Michael Farrell, Jane Gibian, Robert Gray, Ivy Ireland, Anthony Lawrence, Kate Lilley and Mark Tredinnick. Poets Paint Words II is curated by Peter Minter and Lisa Slade, in conjunction with the Sydney Writer's Festival. 

On May 22-23, a number of the poets featured in the 2009 Poets Paint Words exhibition will read their poems in the Gallery. For details, and a full program of events that the Gallery is running in conjunction with the Sydney Writer's Festival, visit the SWF homepage.

To see all the artworks online, and read the poems, you can do so on our 2009 Poets Paint Words page. You can also visit the 2007 Poets Paint Words page. 

 


Release your inner poet.

We had 170 entries into our Release your inner poet poetry competition, each of which responded to the below work of art by Tim Storrier. Poet and University of Newcastle academic Maria Freij judged the competition and selected 11 great poets to receive book prizes courtesy of the Sydney Writer's Festival.

The winners are: David Swain, Amelia Filmer-Sankey, Jan Dean, Po Yu (Eric) Wang, Anne B Udy, F Lucero, Gail Hennessy, Caitlin De Pater, Claire Williams, Jake, and Robert Henderson.

Competition winners can collect their prize from the Gallery.

 

Tim Storrier, Smoke haze over Capricorn 2008, acrylic on canvas

gift of the artist through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program 2009 (pending)


Newcastle Region Art Gallery would like to thank The Lock Up for providing poet Mark Tredinnick with a residency for this exhibition.

 










The James Cook Memorial Fountain, or Civic Park Fountain as it is more commonly known, is regarded as one of the most distinguished landmarks in the City and one of the finest civic fountains in Australia.

 

In 1961, sculptor Margel Hinder entered a competition held by Newcastle City Council for a design to create an illuminated fountain for Civic Park. Mrs Hinder was awarded 400 Pounds for her design, and a further 100 Pounds for including a model with her layout. Mrs Hinder said of her design that she tried to develop a fountain in which the water and sculpture formed a unit. During Winter, the water in all but the central jets can be turned off and the scuplture functions as a complete design in itself. Large areas of water and sculptural shapes used are clearly seen from a distance, and although set against a retaining wall leading to Laman Street, the fountain was designed as a three-dimensional work from every aspect. In 1994, Council drew inspiration from the fountain in creating its corporate logo, which is a stylised depiction of ribbons of water which form the fountain.

 

In 2005, the fountain was refurbished as part of the NCC's ongoing committment to ensure this future work can be enjoyed by future generations.




Ralph Balson is a key figure in the history of Australian abstraction.

Attributed with the country's first solo exhibition of abstract art in 1941, Balson borrowed ideas from music, science and mathematics to create his rhythmic, dynamic abstractions. This painting was included in Balson's now legendary exhibition held at the Anthony Hordern Gallery in Sydney in 1941.







Animal Attraction

11 July - 2 August 2009

This exhibition, held in conjunction with the International Minding Animals conference to be hosted by The University of Newcastle from 13 – 18 July, explores our changing relationship with animals. Work by leading contemporary artists Patricia Piccinini, Danie Mellor and Cherry Hood will be included in the exhibition.

 

On Animal Attraction

The colonisers’ first encounter with the antipodean animal world was with exotic creatures – with animals such as the kangaroo and the platypus - animals that seemed to belie both science and nature. But as the population grew and life became increasingly urban and suburban, our relationship with animals became increasingly domestic and intimate. They became pets, friends and co-workers. Drawn entirely from the Gallery’s collection, this exhibition focuses on our domestic and co-dependent relationship with other animals. Dogs, cats, horses, cows and goats represented in drawings, paintings, prints and sculptures proliferate. These works of art supplant the exotic species that captured our first artists’ imaginations.

It is the decline of native Australian fauna that has provided the inspiration for Patricia Piccinini’s Surrogate (for the northern hairy nosed wombat).  Despite the futuristic appearance of the creature and its habitat, this work is borne out of fact as much as fiction. Scientists are currently experimenting with the use of the common wombat as a surrogate for its rare cousin, the northern hairy nosed wombat. As a scientific cure-all it promises to save the near extinct wombat, an antipodean rarity found in only one place on earth. Piccinini provokes her audience with the question; could we save the species we have threatened by creating a genetically engineered host?

 

The offering

Visitors to the Gallery are also able to meet The offering 2009, a work of art by internationally renowned artist Patricia Piccinini. Breaking gallery tradition, The Offering is a tactile work of art that visitors are invited to touch and feel. 

With its soft skin and infantile features, the baby creature evokes an urge to touch and parent, its expression one of comfort and contentedness.”

Ron Ramsey, Director, Newcastle Region Art Gallery

A prototype for a later work, The offering is an extraordinary creature whose vulnerability belies an exploration of the consequences of genetic engineering. 
 

The offering 2009

Patricia Piccinini The Offering 2009

silicone, animal fur, lambskin




Artexpress

12 February - 26 April 2009

Curated by the NSW Board of Studies, this annual exhibition showcases the artworks made by students for the NSW Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. This year's selection will focus on students from the Hunter region.

 

Resources

Artexpress Guide 2008 (740kb PDF)




Hilda Rix Nicholas, like many of her affluent contemporaries, spent time studying and exhibiting overseas in the early twentieth century.

Many of her works received critical praise in France and England and the exotic pictures she painted whilst in Morocco have recently been acclaimed. Rix Nicholas returned to Australia in 1919 with the conviction, in her own words, 'to paint things typical of my country'. She turned her attention to the bush and to decidely Australian subject matter, frequently depicting women riding, mustering and playing a key role in the Australian bush life.

Painted after the birth of her only child at age forty six, The Summer house is not typical of the subject matter that Rix Nicholas was developing by the nineteen thirties. In fact, she never exhibited the painting during her lifetime. 




Wolfhagen resources

Education resources

Download the education kit and art trail for Illumination The art of Philip Wolfhagen.

Wolfhagen's Gallerists

Philip Wolfhagen is represented by four commercial galleries across Australia. View his work at the following galleries by visiting the links below.

Philip Bacon

Bett Gallery

Dominik Mersch Gallery

Karen Woodbury Gallery

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

2012
Open Gallery
, The Sydney Morning Herald, 17 Nov 2012, p 12
Philip Bacon Galleries, A procession of shadows, exhibition catalogue, Philip Bacon Galleries, Fortitude Valley, Brisbane, 7 Aug – 1 Sept 2012
Timms, Peter, Malcolm Bywaters & Catherine Wolfhagen
, Hits & memories: 10 years at the Academy Gallery, Academy Gallery, University of Tasmania, School of Visual and Performing Arts, Launceston, 10 Feb – 9 March 2012
McDonald, John
, ‘Beyond the pale’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 21 Jan 2012, p 20

2011
Frost, Andrew
, ‘Open Gallery’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 22 Oct 2011, p 13

2010
Kelly, Miriam
, ‘Philip Wolfhagen autumn equinox: the loss of the sun’, Artonview, National Gallery of Australia, issue 61, autumn 2010
Allen, Christopher
, ‘The big picture’, The Weekend Australian, Sydney, 1– 2 May 2010
Boland, Michaela
, ‘Shining a light on the art of painting outdoors’, The Australian, 16 April 2010, p 5
Hobbs, Nicholas, Bec Tudor & Rosie McKeand
, C2: 100 years of Australian art from the TMAG collection, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, 2010
Reid, Michael
, ‘Plenty of talent to boost collections: top 100 investments for 2010’, The Australian, 2 Jan 2010, p 39

2009
Strickland, Katrina
, ‘Comeback proves a sell-out’, The Australian Financial Review, 19 Aug 2009 via COMTEX News Network Inc, 19 August 2009
Bett Gallery Hobart
, Burns, Keeling, Wastell, Wolfhagen: four Tasmanian painters, Bett Gallery, Hobart , 3 July – 16 Aug 2009
Philip Bacon Galleries
, Philip Wolfhagen: out of the garden, exhibition catalogue, Philip Bacon Galleries, Fortitude Valley, Brisbane, 26 May – 20 June 2009

2008
Heathcote, Christopher, Patrick McCaughey & Sarah Thomas
, Encounters with Australian modern art, Hermann Editeurs, Paris, 2008
McCormick, Alice & Sarah Rhodes
, The artist’s lunch: at home with Australia’s most celebrated artists, Murdoch Books Sydney, 2008
Timms, Peter
, ‘Gatecrashing the sublime’, Artlink, vol 28, no 2, 2008, pp 34–37

2007
McDonald, John
, Studio: Australian painters on the nature of creativity, R Ian Lloyd Productions, Singapore, 2007
Strickland, Katrina
, ‘A fleeting moment when the sky fills with meaning’ in The Australian Financial Review, Australasian Business Intelligence, COMTEX News Network Inc, 16 May 2007

2006
Sherman Galleries
, Philip Wolfhagen: night visions, exhibition catalogue, 24 Aug –16 Sept 2006
Murray
Cree, Laura (ed), Twenty: Sherman Galleries 1986–2006, Craftsman House, Melbourne, 2006
Gray, Anna
, ‘Australia and Constable’, catalogue essay, Constable: impressions of land sea and sky, National Gallery of Australia, March 2006
Holmes, Jonathan
, Senses of place: art in Tasmania, 1970–2005, catalogue essay Plimsoll Gallery, Hobart, 2006

2005
Timms, Peter
, Philip Wolfhagen, Craftsman House, Melbourne, 2005
Timms, Peter
, Isolation solitude: Tasmanian wilderness residencies exhibition, Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart, c2005
Bywaters, Malcolm
, Rhapsody 21C: Tasmanian contemporary art, exhibition catalogue, Academy Gallery, University of Tasmania, 2–27 May 2005
Serisier, Gillian
, ‘The art of collectives’, Australian Art Market Report, no 14, Dec 2004 – February 2005, pp 30–32

2004
Timms, Peter
, Philip Wolfhagen: the inner edge, exhibition catalogue, Sherman Galleries, Sydney, 29 July – 21 August 2004
Malor D
, ‘Philip Wolfhagen: the inner edge’, Artlink, vol 24, no 3, 2004, p 93
Wolfhagen, Philip
, The inner edge: Philip Wolfhagen, University of Tasmania, School of Visual and Performing Arts, 14 June – 9 July 2004
Ingram, Terry
, ‘Feeding feeding at show’, Saleroom, The Australian Financial Review, 12 Aug 2004, p 20
Hansen, David
, ‘Philip Wolfhagen’, Art & Australia , vol 42, no 1, spring 2004, pp 90–95
Rae, Maria
, ‘Gallery director in love with history’, Examiner News, 12 June 2004
Wolfhagen, Philip
, Noctiluca artist’s statement, Bett Gallery, Hobart, May–June 2004
Hansen, David
, ‘O earth, return! Philip Wolfhagen’s Tasmanian pastorals’, Art & Australia, vol 42, no 1, spring 2004, pp 90–95

2003
Murray Cree, Laura
, ‘Beauty and hidden agendas’, State of the Arts, July–Sept 2003, pp 80–82
Reid, Michael
, ‘Apple of my isle far more than still life’, The Australian, 4 June 2003, p B1
McCulloch, Susan
, ‘An earthy masterpiece’, The Weekend Australian, 19–20 April 2003
Holmes, Jonathan
, Painting Tasmanian landscape, exhibition catalogue, Plimsoll Gallery, Hobart, 15 March – 6th April 2003
Arkless, Bridget
, Philip Wolfhagen: Archipelago, exhibition catalogue, Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery at Inveresk, February 2003

2002
Genocchio, Benjamin
, ‘Residues of space’, The Weekend Australian, 29–30 June 2002
Sherman Galleries
, Philip Wolfhagen: high ground, exhibition catalogue, Sydney, 5–29 June 2002

2001
Nelson, Robert
, ‘The “death of painting” a little premature’, The Age, 22 Sept 2001
Clarke, Peter
, ‘Picture perfect’, in Country Style, June 2001
Warner, Georgia
, ‘Critics put Tassie artist in elite club’, The Mercury, 16 January 2001
Hutak, Michael
, ‘Australia’s 50 most collectable artists’, Australian Art Collector, no 15, 2001
Dysart, Dinah & Jackie Dunn
, Artbank: Australian art in public places, Artbank, 2001

2000
Hansen, David
, ‘Landscape, geometry and abstraction’, Philip Wolfhagen: converging planes, exhibition catalogue, 9 March – 1 April 2000, Sherman Galleries, Sydney
Hart, Deborah
, ‘Uncommon world’, Artonview, National Gallery of Australia, issue 23, spring 2000
Roberts, Bruce
, ‘A fish-like boat in a water-like landscape’, Island magazine, winter 2000

1999
Sherman Galleries
, Distance: six Tasmanian artists, exhibition catalogue, Sydney, 25 Aug–18 Sept 1999
‘Waxing lyrical in Tasmania’
, Australian Art Collector, issue 8, Apr–June 1999, pp 24–26
Murray Cree, Laura & Nevill Drury
(eds), Australian painting now, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1999
McCulloch, Susan
, ‘Guy Abrahams: dealer in optimism’ Australian Art Collector, issue 7, 1999

1998
Drury, Nevill
, Philip Wolfhagen: surface tension, Sherman Galleries, Sydney, 12 June – 4 July 1998
Mendelssohn, Joanna
, ‘Liquid landscapes from the island state’, The Australian, 12 June 1998
Hart, Deborah
, ‘Temple of Earth Memories’, catalogue essay, Australian Perspecta: between art and nature, Art Gallery of NSW, 1998

1997
Mendelssohn, Joanna
, ‘Creativity as a matter of Perspecta’, The Australian, 8 Aug 1997 p 8
Smee, Sebastian
, ‘180 degrees of separation’, The Sydney Morning Herald, Metro, 20–26 June 1997

1996
Hammond, Victoria
, ‘Painting the spirit of place’, 40° South, no 5, Dec 1996
Auty, Giles
, ‘Southern sojourn’, The Australian, 26–27 Oct 1996
McDonald, John
, ‘Becoming what one is’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 Oct 1996
Meade, Amanda
, ‘It starts with a message’, The Australian, 18 Oct 1996
Sherman Galleries
, Illuminations, exhibition catalogue, Sydney, 10 Oct – 2 Nov 1996
Hammond, Victoria
, ‘Landscape and memory in Tasmania’, Art & Australia, vol 34, no 2, summer 1996, pp 210–19
McDonald, John
, ‘Peaks of inspiration’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 4 May 1996
Simpson, Colin
, ‘Challenging winners: to corner cutters’, The Bulletin, 27 Feb 1996
Geissler, Marie
, ‘Banking on art’, Qantas Club Magazine, Feb 1996, pp 40–43
Auty, Giles
, ‘Sparkle of sweet success’, The Australian, 17–18 Feb 1996
Hammond
, Victoria, Brushing the dark, exhibition catalogue, Contemporary Art Services Tasmania, Jan 1996
McCulloch, Susan
, ‘An art award that keeps on giving’, The Australian, 16 Feb 1996, p 15

1995
Hansen, David
, ‘My dog, your car, our art collection’, Art Monthly Australia, July 1995
Watson, Bronwyn
, ‘Treasures from the corporate world’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 3 Jan 1995
Hammond
, Victoria, Brushing the dark: recent art and Tasmania, Contemporary Art Services Tasmania, Hobart, 1995

1994
Fenner, Felicity
, ‘Sublime horizons’, Sydney Morning Herald, 8 July 1994
Kidd, Courtney
, ‘Landscape as metaphor in the art of Philip Wolfhagen’, Contemporary Art Tasmania Magazine, no 5, 1994

1993
Stanford, Richard
, ‘Heightening the senses’, Elevations, catalogue essay, Devonport Gallery and Arts Centre, Sept 1993

1992
Allen, Christopher
, ‘Seven at Ivan Dougherty Gallery’, Asian Art News, Sept– Oct 1992
Waterlow, Nick
, Seven 7: Leonard Brown, Louise Hearman, Maxie Tjampitjinpa, Aida Tomescu, Alex Wanders, Judy Watson,Philip Wolfhagen, exhibition catalogue, Ivan Dougherty Gallery-College of Fine Arts, University of NSW, Sydney, 4–26 Sept 1992
Delaruelle, Jacques
, ‘Small is beautiful’, Sydney Review, Jan–Feb 1992

1991
Delaruelle, Jacques
, ‘In search of the modern soul’, Sydney Review, Nov 1991
Lynn, Elwyn
, ‘Into the landscape of space exploration’, The Weekend Australian, 12–13 Oct 1991

1990
Lynn, Elwyn
, ‘Idol worship at the altar of abstraction’, The Weekend Australian, 27–28 Oct 1990
McDowell, David
, ‘Hobart: Philip Wolfhagen at Salamanca Place gallery’, Art & Text, no 36, 1990

1989
Waterlow, Nick
, Genius loci: spirit of place, Centre for the Arts, University of Tasmania, Hobart, 1989
Dunbar Diane
, The October show, Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston, Tasmania 1989




NOVOCASTRIA

10 May - 13 July 2014

As a city with diverse geographical features and a broad colonial and Indigenous history, the art Newcastle, NSW produces is equally unique. Depictions of Newcastle's hardened industrial vistas, the city's beaches, harbour and built environment are on display, gathering together a diverse range of artists from the colonial to current day. Novocastria is a visual mapping of Newcastle - its geography, topography, industrial and social heritage.

 

ARTIST TALK
with Rew Hanks
Saturday 24 May 2014
2.00pm - 3.00pm
Free, bookings required
Call 02 4974 5100

Rew Hanks' technical prowess is immediately apparent when viewing his prints, his work contains a wealth of references. Visit the Gallery to hear Rew Hanks speak about his works on display, his art practice, and watch him demonstrate how to print from a linocut.


READ ALL ABOUT IT
A Treasure Trove of historic Newcastle newspapers
Presented in partnership with the School of Humanities and Social Science, University of Newcastle
Tuesday 27 May 2014
2.00pm - 4.30pm
Free, bookings required
Call 02 4974 5100

Trove, the National Library of Australia¡'s online full-text database is transforming historical research in Australia by providing free online access to books, articles and photographs. Come celebrate the addition of Newcastle newspapers from the period 1859 - 1954. Speakers will share new histories based on this resource and provide tips on how you can use it.

 

ARTISTS GET SOCIAL
Hunter artists' get-together
Monday 2 June 2014
5.30pm - 6.30pm
Free, bookings required
Includes refreshments
Call 02 4974 5100

Local artists, art educators and tertiary students are invited to join Gallery staff for an informal viewing of the exhibition, featuring exhibiting artists discussing their works.

 

TODDLER PLAY DAY
Playing Pirates
Monday 2 June 2014
9.30am - 11.00am
$5 per child, includes all materials and morning tea
Bookings and payment required
Call 02 4974 5100

Inspired by the works of Daniel Boyd, children will play like pirates. Enjoy a family friendly atmosphere, with exhibition inspired games, art activities, singing and stories, followed by a morning snack.

 

NOVO TALKS
A four-part series of exhibition insights
Tuesday 3, 10, 17 and 24 June 2014
6.00pm - 7.30pm
$15 per talk, $50 for the series
Includes refreshments
Bookings and payments required
Call 02 4974 5100

3 June 2014
Chair of the Coal River Working Party, Gionni Di Gravio, speaks about Newcastle's colonial history

10 June 2014
Local artist Kerrie Coles speaks about the influence of Newcastle's coal industry on her work

17 June 2014
Local artist Liam Power speaks of his interest in Newcastle's working harbour

24 June 2014
Local artist Michael Bell speaks about his work and life living in coastal Newcastle.


NOVOCASTRIANS IN CONCERT
Free music events at the Gallery
Sunday 22 & 29 June 2014
3.00pm - 4.00pm
Free, bookings required
Call 02 4974 5100

22 June 2014
Newcastle Conservatorium Community Strings, Senior Orchestra

29 June 2014
Novocastrian performers play the Gallery's Stuart and Sons piano, accompanied by violin and flute.


TAKE IT HOME
Novocastria exhibition brochure and Kids' Art Trail

Collect your copy of these free resources during your visit, or download them from our Education Resources page.




Zen and the art of Japanese Ceramics

6 November 2010 - 16 January 2011

In celebration of the sister-city relationship between the City of Newcastle and Ube, Japan this exhibition explores the influence of Zen Buddhism on art with its emphasis of gesture, simplicity, spontaneity and the essential qualities of materials, technique and the object. Through the Gallery’s significant collection of Japanese ceramics these principles are given form and are further translated into western painting by Australian artists including Royston Harpur, Peter Upward and Tony Tuckson.

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 16 November
Exhibition Co-curator and ceramist Paul Davis will discuss the art behind pieces in the exhibition.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Zen and the art of Japanese culture*
10.00am – 3.00pm
Monday 22 November
A day of events in celebration of Japanese culture, including tea ceremonies, dance and poetry.
School groups are welcome, but reservations are essential.
Free

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Resources
Exhibition brochure available

 

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




HANS HEYSEN An Art Gallery of South Australia travelling exhibition

20 November 2010 - 30 January 2011

One of Australia’s greatest artists, Hans Heysen (1877-1968), will be celebrated with this major retrospective of his work. This exhibition features 67 works of art created over the artist's seventy year career.

In addition to his iconic ‘gum tree’ paintings, the exhibition will take a fresh look at Heysen’s lesser-known themes. It will trace his development from early student days painting in Europe from 1899-1903, including images of Paris and Venice, to the revelation of barren landscapes and ancient mountain forms in the Flinders Ranges from 1926 onwards. The exhibition will also feature works of art from the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection.

An admission fee applies. General public $8.
Art Gallery Society members/conc. $5.
Booked school groups and children under 12 free.


This exhibition is supported by Visions of Australia, an Australian Government program supporting touring exhibitions by providing funding assistance for the development and touring of Australian cultural material across Australia.




Adults
Public lecture*
10.30am – 11.30am
Saturday 20 November
Exhibition Curator Rebecca Capes-Baldwin will discuss Heysen’s work.
Free with cost of entry

Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 23 November
Lisa Slade will speak about the politics of Heysen’s practice.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.
(inc. exhibition)

Watercolour workshop*
10.00am – 4.00pm
Sunday 28 November
Join artist Fiona Pfennigwerth for this class on the art of watercolour.
$40 (includes materials)

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free with entry

Education
General tour available**
Free

Resources
Children’s art trail and education resource
Available online

 

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




Volunteer for ARTCART 2010


The Gallery's favourite family activity ARTCART will be starting again in October and we are looking for committed volunteers to help out.


ARTCART volunteers love working with young children and their families to facilitate creation of a work of art in response to the Gallery’s current exhibitions. ARTCART volunteers are creative, great communicators, great listeners, have an interest in and enthusiasm for art and of course spare time every few weeks on a Saturday or Sunday. Preference will be giving to applicants with an education background. ARTCART Volunteers work with children aged between 3 to 10 years and will be subject to a working with children check. They are committed to the Gallery and to the community.


Application Due: 17th of SEPTEMBER 2010


ARTCART will relaunch to the public on Saturday the 16th of October and runs between 10:30am and 12:30pm every Saturday and Sunday.


Download the ARTCART volunteer application form




The Newcastle Chest 2010

Esme Timbery
Bidjigal artist Esme Timbery belongs to a long line of shell workers from La Perouse. With the assistance of her daughter Marilyn Russell, Timbery has made new work inspired by the shell, algae and seaweed drawers of the Macquarie Collectors’ Chest. For Timbery and her family, shells are protective. They possess healing properties and help link the present and past. Timbery has used Macquarie tartan to cover the tiny slippers and boomerangs encrusted with white shells collected from Newcastle, Sydney and beyond. The shells colonise the tartan surfaces, returning them to nature and ‘country’.

Esme Timbery Macquarie slippers and boomerangs 2010

Esme Timbery Macquarie slippers and boomerangs (detail) 2010
Macquarie tartan, cardboard, shells and glitter,
dimensions variable

The Newcastle Chest
2010
Commissioned by Newcastle Art Gallery
with the assistance of James and Judy Hart,
Robert and Lindy Henderson, Valerie Ryan,
Newcastle Art Gallery Society and
Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation
Newcastle Art Gallery collection

Cabinetmaker Scott Mitchell
Australian red cedar (Toona ciliata),
NSW rosewood (Dysoxylum fraserianum),
River red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis),
tartan, glass and brass fitting
closed: 53.0 x 71.0 x 46.0 cm

CURIOUS COLONY A twenty first century Wunderkammer is on display in the Gallery 10 July - 29 August 2010.




The Newcastle Chest 2010

Maria Fernanda Cardoso
Colombian-born, Sydney-based artist Maria Fernanda Cardoso engages with the entomological world in her work, inspired by the spiders, beetles and butterflies displayed in the Macquarie chest. Cardoso has focused on the specimens that are NOT seen in the original chest, that is, those creatures from the insect world that use mimic camouflage as a survival strategy. These insects offer a metaphor of the societal pressures placed on the individual to assimilate, to blend in – pressures felt by Cardoso herself as a migrant in Australia.

 Maria Fernanda Cardoso Dead and green leaves 2010

 

Maria Fernanda Cardoso Dead and green leaves 2010
Dead leaf butterflies (Kallima inachus inachus),
Leaf insects (Phyllium giganteum), branch, metal
pins, foam, and glass, 33.5 x 64.0 x 9.5 cm
courtesy the artist and Grantpirrie, Sydney

The Newcastle Chest 2010
Commissioned by Newcastle Art Gallery
with the assistance of James and Judy Hart,
Robert and Lindy Henderson, Valerie Ryan,
Newcastle Art Gallery Society and
Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation
Newcastle Art Gallery collection

Cabinetmaker Scott Mitchell
Australian red cedar (Toona ciliata),
NSW rosewood (Dysoxylum fraserianum),
River red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis),
tartan, glass and brass fittings
closed: 53.0 x 71.0 x 46.0 cm

CURIOUS COLONY A twenty first century Wunderkammer is on display in the Gallery 10 July - 29 August 2010.


 




The Newcastle Chest 2010

Louise Weaver
Melbourne-based artist Louise Weaver has responded to the Macquarie chest’s drawers and trays of taxidermied birds. Weaver’s drawer installation includes a native budgerigar, a zebra finch and a rainbow lorikeet, united by a wreath of wattle made from crocheted handblown-glass orbs. Weaver’s birds are ‘taxidermied from the outside’. Mummified in brightly coloured crotchet, they call into question our historical treatment of nature and our frenzied collecting and museumising.

 

 Louise Weaver Arena 2010

Louise Weaver Arena 2010
hand-crocheted lambswool over taxidermied
zebra finch (Poephila guttata), budgerigar
(Melopsittacus undulatus), rainbow lorikeet
(Trichoglossus haematodus), hand-blown glass,
wooden beads, cotton embroidery thread, gold
leaf and mono filament, 8.2 x 47.0 x 36.0 cm
Photography by Mark Ashkanasy
courtesy the artist and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney

The Newcastle Chest 2010
Commissioned by Newcastle Art Gallery
with the assistance of James and Judy Hart,
Robert and Lindy Henderson, Valerie Ryan,
Newcastle Art Gallery Society and
Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation
Newcastle Art Gallery collection

Cabinetmaker Scott Mitchell
Australian red cedar (Toona ciliata),
NSW rosewood (Dysoxylum fraserianum),
River red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis),
tartan, glass and brass fittings
closed: 53.0 x 71.0 x 46.0 cm

CURIOUS COLONY A twenty first century Wunderkammer is on display in the Gallery 10 July - 29 August 2010.




The Newcastle Chest 2010

Lionel Bawden
Sydney-based artist Lionel Bawden has been inspired by the booty in the bottom drawer of the Macquarie chest, which includes toucan bills, seed pods and a shark egg. Bawden has handcrafted a bower for the bottom drawer made entirely from coloured pencils. The form of these contemporary trinkets and baubles echoes the puzzling originals and provides a lure into a new imagined world.

 

 Lionel Bawden Bower 2010

Lionel Bawden Bower 2010
coloured Staedtler pencils, epoxy, incralac and
linseed oil, 11 forms, dimensions variable
courtesy the artist and Grantpirrie, Sydney

The Newcastle Chest 2010
Commissioned by Newcastle Art Gallery
with the assistance of James and Judy Hart,
Robert and Lindy Henderson, Valerie Ryan,
Newcastle Art Gallery Society and
Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation
Newcastle Art Gallery collection

Cabinetmaker Scott Mitchell
Australian red cedar (Toona ciliata),
NSW rosewood (Dysoxylum fraserianum),
River red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis),
tartan, glass and brass fittings
closed: 53.0 x 71.0 x 46.0 cm

CURIOUS COLONY A twenty first century Wunderkammer is on display in the Gallery 10 July - 29 August 2010.




TEMPEST Andy Devine, Peter Gardiner and James Gleeson

14 August - 24 October 2010

Industrial landscapes or internal mindscapes? This exhibition explores the common ground between Australia’s foremost Surrealist James Gleeson and Newcastle based artists Peter Gardiner and Andy Devine.

 

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 17 August
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

 

Children / youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am – 12.30pm
Tuesday 28 September to Friday 1 October
Ages 5-8 and ages 9-12
$22

 

Education
General tour available**
Free

 

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am – 12.00pm
Wednesday 1 September
Artist Andy Devine reveals what inspires him to paint.
$10 Members/conc., $15 non-members
RSVP: 02 4974 5123

 

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112

 

Andy Devine Corvus V 2010

Andy Devine Corvus V (detail) 2010
acrylic on plywood, 133.8 x 118.0 cm
Les Renfrew bequest 2010
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection




CURIOUS COLONY A twenty first century Wunderkammer

 

S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney

11 January - 20 February 2011

 

One of Newcastle Region Art Gallery’s most successful exhibitions has been requested by a Sydney venue, and now you have the chance to catch it for a second time!

 

This major exhibition brings together the work of colonial artists and contemporary artists in a twenty first century room of wonders. Artists include Richard Browne, WB Gould, Fiona Hall, Narelle Jubelin, John Lewin, Joseph Lycett, Danie Mellor,Kate Rohde, Joan Ross, Sarah Smuts-Kennedy, Robyn Stacey and Louise Weaver.

 

Curious Colony also features The Newcastle Chest, made by celebrated artisan Scott Mitchell in collaboration with Lionel Bawden, Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Esme Timbery, Louise Weaver and Philip Wolfhagen.

 

Resources
Exhibition catalogue available
This touring exhibition is supported by a full colour catalogue with essays by Danie Mellor, Ian McLean and Lisa Slade.
$29.95

 

S.H. Ervin Gallery
National Trust of Australia
Watson Road, Observatory Hill,
The Rocks, NSW 2000
Tuesday - Sunday
11am to 5pm
http://www.nationaltrust.com.au/properties/gallery/default.asp 

 

Explore The Newcastle Chest 2010

Explore CURIOUS COLONY A twenty first century Wunderkammer

 




CITIZEN COLLECTORS

11 June - 4 September 2011

What happens when a group of people get together in the name of collecting art? This exhibition surveys the last ten years of art collecting by the syndicate Hawkesbury One. Included is a major new work by Pamela Mei-Leng See, commissioned by the group for Newcastle Region Art Gallery. Other artists represented include James Angus, Adam Cullen, Destiny Deacon, Joachim Froese, Shaun Gladwell, Lucas Grogan, Newell Harry and Callum Morton.

Visit the Hawkesbury One website, or watch ABC TV's Art Nation feature on the group.


 

 

Adults
Discussion Forum*
Collecting Collectively
11.00am
Sunday 19 June
Join Hawkesbury One collectors Janne Ryan and Ian Andrews with art dealer Damien Minton and art advisor Lisa Corsi in a conversation about the dynamics of an art collective and how they develop a collection by committee.
Free

Artist Pamela Mei-Leng See
11.00am
Saturday 23 July
Pamela Mei-Leng See will give an overview of her work practice, and discuss her work commissioned for Citizen Collectors.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am - 12.30pm
Wednesday 6 July
Members of the Hawkesbury One group discuss the art of collecting.
$10 members, $15 non-members
payable at the door
RSVP essential 4974 5123 or
gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




Art Cart

10.30am – 12.30pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Art Cart is a weekly workshop that engages children with art through discussion and hands on activities. Working with an art tutor and Gallery volunteers, kids get creative and make their own works of art in response to the Gallery’s current exhibitions. Parents are encouraged to get involved too.

Try to get to the Gallery by 12.15pm to make sure you have time to finish your art activity.



Art Cart is sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

BMT Tax Depreciation logo The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney logo Mega Pacific Newcastle logo S&S Creativity unlimited logo
 

If you miss a week of Art Cart, call into the Gallery to pick up an art card with the latest activities.








SURFACE TENSION The art of Euan Macleod 1991 - 2009

27 August - 16 October 2011

This exhibition demonstrates the spiritual dimension of Macleod’s work that amplifies its universal value.
A Tweed River Art Gallery touring exhibition, curated by Gavin Wilson.


Adults
Masterclass with Euan Macleod**
9.30am - 4.00pm
Sunday 28 August
This class is restricted to artists who already have a level of achievement in their work, and will appreciate the opportunity to interact with this established artist. Rather than conducting a conventional class, Macleod will work with participants to resolve issues in their own work. Please note that this workshop is now fully booked.
$25 (excludes materials)

Teachers’ Professional Development Day**
9.30am - 3.00pm
Monday 25 July
$25 (includes lunch and materials)

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Children/youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am - 12.30pm
4 - 7 October

$15

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Resources
Exposure -
artist+student+documentary
www.nag.org.au/learning/resources
smART space resource centre
Education kit

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am - 12.00pm
Wednesday 5 October

Tweed Heads Art Gallery Director Susi Muddiman looks at the spiritual dimension of Euan Macleod’s work.
$10 members, $15 non-members
payable at the door.
RSVP essential 4974 5123 or gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112


This exhibition is supported by Visions of Australia, an Australian Government program supporting touring exhibitions by providing funding assistance for the development and touring of Australian cultural material across Australia.
Euan Macleod is represented by Watters Gallery, Sydney; Niagara Galleries, Melbourne and Victor Mace Fine Art Gallery, Brisbane.
Tweed River Art Gallery is assisted by the NSW Government through Arts NSW.

 




LESS IS MORE Morandi & Hanssen Pigott

5 March - 8 May 2011

Gwyn Hanssen Pigott draws inspiration from Giorgio Morandi’s still life paintings and works on paper. This exhibition brings the two artists together to celebrate work that is “about essence; the metaphysical expressed through the solidly physical and knowable.” (Gwyn Hanssen Pigott)

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 8 March
Speaker TBC
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Artist talk*
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturday 19 March
Artist Gwyn Hanssen Pigott will give an insight into her practice.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Children/youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am – 12.30pm
12 – 15 April
Ages 5-8, 9-12 and 13-16.
$22

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am – 12.00pm
Wednesday 9 March
Director Ron Ramsey will discuss the connections between these artists.
$10 members, $15 non-members
RSVP essential 02 4974 5123

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




Speaking in Colour

19 March - 29 May 2011

This exhibition explores how Indigenous artists speak through colour. With paintings drawn from the Kimberley coast, the Tiwi Islands and the Central Desert, Speaking in Colour underscores the rich conceptual differences in naming, understanding and using colour across diverse language groups.

Artists represented include Sally Gabori, Kitty Kantilla and Daniel Walbidi,as well as a newly acquired suite of vivid watercolours by artists from Ntaria (Hermannsburg). Curated by Una Rey.

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 29 March
Exhibition Curator Una Rey will discuss works of art from the exhibition.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 5 April
A discussion on the Aboriginal art market.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 12 April
Dr John Gage will speak about the use of colour in Indigenous art.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

National Sorry Day*
5.30pm
Thursday 26 May
Join us in marking this important occasion.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Resources
Exhibition brochure available

 

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




WILLIAM ROSE Composing space

19 March - 29 May 2011

Born in the industrial suburb of Carrington, William Rose held his first exhibition in Newcastle in 1954 and organised the seminal exhibition Directions 1 with John Olsen, John Passmore, Eric Smith and Robert Klippel in 1956. Rose’s drawings and paintings are relentless and disciplined pursuits in the composition of abstract space. Included in the exhibition are works from the artist’s estate.

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 22 March
Gallery Program Manager Tristan Sharp and William’s daughter Kate in conversation.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Classical Music in the Gallery
2.00pm
Sunday 29 May
Join us for a classical piano program of works once enjoyed by William Rose. This event is in conjunction with the closing of the exhibition William Rose Composing space.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Children/youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am – 12.30pm
18 – 22 April
Ages 5-8, 9-12 and 13-16.
$22

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Resources
Exhibition brochure available

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am – 12.00pm
Wednesday 6 April
Gallery Program Manager Tristan Sharp will explore Rose’s work in the Gallery’s collection.
$10 members, $15 non-members
RSVP essential 02 4974 5123


Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




The Newcastle Chest 2010

Philip Wolfhagen
Tasmanian painter Philip Wolfhagen has made three oil paintings on red cedar panels in response to convict painter Joseph Lycett’s panels on the Macquarie chest. Sustained looking at Lycett’s work has endeared Wolfhagen to the convict artist’s many idiosyncrasies, including his dramatic cloudscapes and his detailed treatment of the landscape. The coastal landscapes depicted by Wolfhagen, including the distinctive sedimentary rock configurations, are at once a tribute to Lycett and the artist’s direct response to the Newcastle coastline.

The Newcastle Chest featuring Philip Wolfhagen 2010

Philip Wolfhagen Colonial endemic 2010
oil on Australian red cedar (Toona ciliata),
42.5 x 32.0 x 1.2 cm

Philip Wolfhagen Waiting for trade winds 2010
oil and beeswax on Australian red cedar (Toona ciliata),
41.3 x 66.4 x 1.2 cm

Philip Wolfhagen Homage to JL 2010
oil on Australian red cedar (Toona ciliata),
42.5 x 32.0 x 1.2 cm

all works of art by Philip Wolfhagen courtesy the artist and Dominik Mersch Gallery, Sydney

The Newcastle Chest 2010
Commissioned by Newcastle Art Gallery
with the assistance of James and Judy Hart,
Robert and Lindy Henderson, Valerie Ryan,
Newcastle Art Gallery Society and
Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation
Newcastle Art Gallery collection

Cabinetmaker Scott Mitchell
Australian red cedar (Toona ciliata),
NSW rosewood (Dysoxylum fraserianum),
River red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis), tartan, glass
and brass fittings, closed: 53.0 x 71.0 x 46.0 cm

CURIOUS COLONY A twenty first century Wunderkammer is on display in the Gallery 10 July - 29 August 2010.




The Newcastle Chest 2010

A contemporary work of art created for the exhibition CURIOUS COLONY A twenty first century Wunderkammer, The Newcastle Chest 2010 has been inspired by the Macquarie Collectors’ Chest and has been commissioned by Newcastle Art Gallery, with the support of private benefactors. Made by cabinetmaker Scott Mitchell from the same native timber species found in the Macquarie chest and crafted to the same dimensions, this contemporary Wunderkammer conceals and reveals the work of five of Australia’s leading artists - Lionel Bawden, Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Esme Timbery, Louise Weaver and Philip Wolfhagen.

Visit and explore the Macquarie Collectors’ Chest at the New South Wales State Library website.

Download The Newcastle Chest 2010 education resource for Years 5- 10.

CURIOUS COLONY A twenty first century Wunderkammer is on display in the Gallery 10 July - 29 August 2010.


The Newcastle Chest 2010
Cabinetmaker:
Scott Mitchell
Artists: Lionel Bawden, Maria Fernanda Cardoso,
Esme Timbery, Louise Weaver and Philip Wolfhagen

Commissioned by Newcastle Art Gallery
Purchased with the assistance of
James and Judy Hart, Robert and Lindy Henderson,
Valerie Ryan, Newcastle Art Gallery Society and
Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation 2010
Newcastle Art Gallery collection




Conversations with the Collection

Hany Armanious and John Kang

HANY ARMANIOUS
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection

To produce this work, Hany Armanious has cast the negative space within each glass, the space usually reserved for liquids, in a liquid form of petroleum called ‘hotmelt’. The cast space - which has become solid emptiness - is placed on top of each inverted glass. The glass therefore becomes a tiny pedestal for each mould, a clever play on the traditional sculpture and plinth.

By altering the physical presentation of a found object, Armanious transforms the everyday. The banal form and function of the drinking glass and the formless quality of liquid petroleum are transformed into a sculptural presence. Armanious is obsessed with the magical properties of the casting process and many of his works deal with the alchemical transformation of one substance into another, via what the artist describes as the ‘cult of casting’.




 

JOHN KANG
Expression identity
collection of Works
Cherrybrook Technology High School

The way we express our existence can be conveyed by a dynamic approach, reflecting on the past to make sense of the present and developing a new perception of life. The forces linking our reality with the natural world should intertwine to formulate our introspective transition to the past. My work embodies the multidimensional nature of humanity’s sense of identity and how we must grasp the past to nourish a new understanding of our present surroundings and discover our own utopia.






Conversations with the Collection

John Olsen and Seraya Harding

JOHN OLSEN
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection

A sense of joie de vivre is implicit in Olsen’s dynamic ceiling painting Life burst, commissioned for the hallway of Thelma Clune’s residence in 1964. The subject was particularly pertinent to Olsen’s life, as the work was painted at the time his daughter Louise was born. As Thelma Clune recalled: [Olsen] was trotting off to his wife in the hospital in the evening and painting my ceiling in the day … It was an opportunity to rejoice in him having a daughter. He didn’t get down and do it on the floor or on the table. It all went up on the ceiling by his own hand … I don’t know how he could paint for so many hours looking up.i

Olsen wanted the Life burst ceiling, now in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery, to be a welcoming feature to Thelma Clune’s apartment. Here paint has been pulled along from the right – dabbed, twisted, scratched into, squeezed from a tube and layered, culminating in a dramatic burst of life. For Olsen, the celebratory emotional tenor of this work was closely allied to Gerald Manley Hopkins’ poem Spring: ‘What is all this juice and all this joy?’2 The fact that Olsen was looking up at the ceiling while painting, meant that he was continually thinking about the viewer below. As opposed to the Renaissance conception of perspectival space Olsen wanted to create 'an all-at-once world’.

1 Extract from interview with Thelma Clune included in Deborah Hart, John Olsen, Craftsman House, St Leonards, Sydney, third reprint, 2002, p. 79

2 Poems and prose of Gerard Manly Hopkins, p.28, cited in Hart, John Olsen, Craftsman House, p.246

Text by Deborah Hart
Senior Curator, Australian Paintings and Sculpture after 1920, National Gallery of Australia 

 


Seraya Harding Creation of beliefs 2009

SERAYA HARDING
Creation of beliefs
time based
Presbyterian Ladies College Sydney

My work explores how ideas and beliefs are formed. Focusing on universal issues, the audience is presented with the frustration of questions without answers. Why is religion such an integral part of life? When does society give us the freedom to make decisions and choices? I have incorporated elements of the art of Kara Walker, Len Lye and Marie Taylor: silhouette images, expressive abstract ink drawings and experimental film-making, combined with minimalist soundscapes and the flowing spiritual aspects of calligraphy within Zen philosophy, are all integral aspects of my practice.

See Seraya's visual arts process diary at the AGNSW website





Conversations with the Collection

John Turier and Jarred Fehlberg

JOHN TURIER
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection

Although John Turier was born in Sydney he has lived and worked in Newcastle since 1976. Recently Turier has moved away from cast metal forms towards construction in timber and cloth, with the addition of found materials. Bat Bat combines found marine materials with the delicacy of silk stretched across a timber carapace to make a whirly gig. This work exemplifies Turier’s capacity to balance whimsy with a poetic sensibility.

 


Jarred Fehlberg Cast away 2009

JARRED FEHLBERG
Cast away
sculpture
Central Coast Adventist School

I created my artwork from discarded and found objects – seed pods, old tools and unwanted fabric, among other things. Cast away is a play on words, describing the cast-off mediums I used, as well as ‘shipwrecked person’. The work was inspired by my interest and involvement in boating and water sports, and my other passion for woodworking and creating things with my hands enabled me to combine both of my interests.








Conversations with the Collection

Mike Parr and Minkhy Le

 

MIKE PARR
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection

Mike Parr has produced over 1000 works within the context of his self-imposed ‘Self-Portrait’ series, in a range of media that includes performance, installation, sculpture, drawing, etching and photography. In 2005, Newcastle Region Art Gallery held the survey exhibition, ‘CUT YOUR THROAT AN INCH AT A TIME: A Survey of the Works of Mike Parr 1970-2005’, at this time the etching, Untitled self-portrait No. 4: from a series of six 1989, was donated to the Gallery by Parr. Parr practice is influenced by his extensive reading of psychoanalytic theory evident in his demanding self-analysis included his work.


Minkhy Le Injury - before and after 2009

 

MINKHY LE
Injury – before and after
drawing
Canley Vale High School

My artwork evolved from the theme of identity and self-expression. My initial frustration at having a broken collarbone and a non-functioning drawing hand, was an emotional experience: learning to use my other hand led me through a journey of self-discovery in which I developed an intuitive drawing style that I found very exciting. Later in the healing process I was able to draw using both hands simultaneously, helping me realise that my hands are merely tools for my mind.






Conversations with the Collection

Peter Booth and Brooke Mackay


PETER BOOTH
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection

Peter Booth is best known for his bleak landscapes and apocalyptic visions. This large scale geometric abstraction was made as a commission when Booth was at art school and is markedly different to his now signature style. His art teacher at the time, John Brack, recommended Booth’s skills to a soft drink company who were looking for a new logo.

In response to the brief Booth made this large hard edge painting. There are no visible brush marks or signs of the artist’s hand. Instead Untitled 1962 carries the hallmarks of Pop art where paintings aspire to being like consumer products, colourful, exuberant and seductive.


Brooke Mackay Under construction 2009

BROOKE MACKEY
Under construction
Ceramics
Caroline Chisholm College

My artwork investigates the constructive elements of the industrial world, the overpowering strength of construction and the man-made world, with the use of strong, bold visual representations of shapes and patterns. The glazes and oxides are a tribute to the colours and textures of various inspirational construction sites – scrap yards, the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the St Marys industrial area. Robert Klippel and the constructivists encouraged my interests in observing the intricate details of the industrial fingerprints that depict urban society.








Conversations with the Collection

Rosalie Gascoigne and Eleanor Miller

 

ROSALIE GASCOIGNE
Newcastle Region Art Gallery

When Rosalie Gascoigne arrived in rural Australia from New Zealand one of the first things she noticed were the birds. Large and loud, Australian birds such as currawongs, magpies and cockatoos appeared so different to their New Zealand counterparts.



Birds are a recurring theme in Gascoigne’s art and this sculpture is one of the earliest bird works made by the artist, who didn’t start making art until she was in her fifties. Combining old materials including a weathered soft drink crate, Gascoigne constructs a rudimentary bird box, or bird cage. The birds themselves are fashioned from timber off-cuts, their wings are formed from the roughly torn edges of timber that carry painterly traces of their former life. Later works by Gascoigne used the Arnott’s logo of the rosella as a symbol of Australian culture.


 

Eleanor Frances Miller Defeat or surrender 2009

 

ELEANOR MILLER
Defeat or surrender?
Sculpture
Kincoppal-Rose Bay School of the Sacred Heart

My experience with an abused horse, its force and strength working against me instead of with me, led to this concept. After months of training I managed to develop a connection with the horse. But was this through force, or the horse’s own willingness to learn? I wanted to convey the unbreakable ties to instinct by appealing to the concept of herd mentality and internal instincts such as the ‘fight or flight’ response and obvious containment which I have displayed both by metaphorical and literal allusions within the two boxes, and in the short film Defeat or surrender?.



 




Conversations with the Collection

Cherry Hood and Yasmin McCall

 

CHERRY HOOD
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection

Cherry Hood is a Sydney based visual artist who uses watercolor and pigment to make oversized figurative paintings and works on paper. A celebrated watercolourist, Hood rose to prominence with her Archibald Prize winning portrait of musician Simon Tedeschi in 2002 and is known for her portrayal of adolescent subjects.

Harold's End  which is in the Gallery’s collectionbegan as a series of illustrations made for the book by Cherry Hood illustrated JT LeRoy's 2005 novel. The prints, made from Hood’s watercolours, provide great insight into her practice – they capture the expressive drips and veils of colour found in Hood’s work. They also capture her empathy for her subjects and in this series, the adolescents are depicted with empathy.


Yasmin McCall Peturbation 2009

 

YASMIN MCCALL
Perturbation
photomedia
St Francis Xavier’s College

My work examines the mental and emotional state of modern teenage society. In a parody of Jill Greenberg’s controversial ‘End times’, I have explored my teenage world where feelings are frequently suppressed, due to the ‘need’ for self-preservation. This social façade is represented by the figures with their polished skin and flawless features; however, these ‘perfect’ figures present us with intense emotions which deny this and confront us with what we all have simmering beneath our own mask. This is pertinent to teenagers during their transition to adulthood, as they learn to become comfortable in their own skin.






Living Music: A six part lecture series with David Banney


6.30pm - 8.30pm
Thursdays 6 May - 10 June 2010

Join David Banney, conductor, composer, teacher and the director of the Newcastle String Academy for this series of talks on the historical journey of music, from the Enlightenment to today. Presented by the Art Gallery Society.

PROGRAM

06 May
The Golden Age: music in the Age of Enlightenment.

13 May
Rebels, Revolutionaries and Romantics: music of the 19th century.

20 May
North, South, East and West: Nationalism in music.

27 May
‘In the beginning were the words…’the origins of Western music.

03 June
Pearls before swine: Baroque music.

10 June
Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue: the 20th century and beyond.

 

Full season subscription
Gallery Society Members & conc. $120
Non-members $180

Single tickets
Gallery Society Members & conc. $25
Non-members $35
Booking forms available at the Art Gallery shop or for full details, download the flyer.




Conversations with the Collection

Imants Tillers and Holly Farrell

 

IMANTS TILLERS

White Aborigines (no. 2) 1983 uses the artist’s now well known canvas board system, where pre-made canvasses, in this case 100 of them, are combined to create the overall picture. The background or landscape is created by a repetition of the artist’s hand prints in a limited palette over the entire surface. This method recalls the stenciled hand prints found in rock sites across Australia that testify to Aboriginal ownership of the land.

Two large non Aboriginal figures, inspired German cartoonist Wilhelm Busch, cavort and combust in the middle of the painting. This imagery, in conjunction with the title of the work, invites us to read the work as an ironic comment on our troubled sense of belonging and the ongoing tensions between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians.



Holly Farrell 24 Rabbits 2009

 

HOLLY FARRELL
Warners Bay High School
24 Rabbits
Collection of Works

My artwork is about the introduction of the European rabbit into Australia and its destructive effect it has had our environment. I have examined the issue of preserving, preventing or exterminating introduced species. This is important to me because I sympathise with the rabbits. My work relates to personal choices I have made, such as becoming a vegetarian in support of animal rights; yet, I do also understand the value of preserving the natural landscape and indigenous species. Therefore I am left in conflict, just as the audience is left puzzled by the opinions I have expressed.

See Holly's visual arts process diary at the AGNSW website
 







CURIOUS COLONY A twenty first century Wunderkammer

10 July - 29 August 2010

A twenty first century room of wonders where colonial curiosities jostle contemporary art. This major exhibition brings together the work of colonial artists Augustus Earle, Richard Browne, John Lewin, Joseph Lycett, Walter Preston and James Wallis in juxtaposition with contemporary artists Brook Andrew, Lionel Bawden, Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Fiona Hall, Narelle Jubelin, Fiona MacDonald, Danie Mellor, Kate Rohde, Joan Ross, Sarah Smuts-Kennedy, Robyn Stacey, Imants Tillers, Esme Timbery, Louise Weaver and Philip Wolfhagen.

Curious Colony will feature a chest commissioned for the exhibition that contains wonders from the world of contemporary art made by celebrated Canberra based artisan Scott Mitchell in collaboration with five of Australia’s leading artists - Lionel Bawden, Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Esme Timbery, Louise Weaver and Philip Wolfhagen. This contemporary cabinet of curiosity been inspired by the Macquarie Collectors’ Chest made in Newcastle, New South Wales around 1818 for Governor Lachlan Macquarie.
Explore The Newcastle Chest 2010

 

Adults
NAIDOC Week artist forum*
11.00am – 1.00pm
Saturday 10 July
Exhibition Curator Lisa Slade with artists Joan Ross and Danie Mellor.
Free

Winter Heat
6.30pm
Saturday 10 July
Late night opening, in conjunction with Newcastle L!veSites, featuring a performance of Peter Sculthorpe’s Remembering Mrs Macquarie.

Book Launch*
5.30pm - 7.00pm
Friday 23 July
Join author Elizabeth Ellis for the Newcastle launch of Rare and Curious: The Secret History of Governor Macquarie’s Collectors’ Chest.
Free

Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesdays 20 & 27 July, 3 & 10 August
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Children / youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am – 12.30pm
Tuesday 13 to Friday 16 July
Ages 5-8 and ages 9-12
$22

 

Education
Teachers’ preview**
4.30pm – 6.00pm
Thursday 24 June
Join Exhibition Curator Lisa Slade and Paul Brunton, Curator NSW State Library, for a discussion on art in the age of Macquarie. This exhibition prelude will provide insights for teachers working across the curriculum.
Refreshments and resources included
Free

Senior student study day**
9.30am – 3.30pm
Monday 2 August
Come to discover what contemporary art has to do with colonial Australia.
$15

Artist forum**
2.00pm
Sunday 8 August
Artists Maria Fernanda Cordoso, Lionel Bawden and Scott Mitchell reveal secrets from The Newcastle Chest.
Free

Focus tour available**
Free

 

Resources
Exhibition catalogue
The exhibition will be supported by a full colour catalogue with essays by Danie Mellor, Ian McLean and Lisa Slade.
$29.95

Education kits
Interactive education resource
for Years 5 – 8
Printable education resource
The Newcastle Chest 2010 education resource for Years 5-10

 

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am - 12.00pm
Wednesday 4 August
Explore the culture of curiosity in the age of Governor Macquarie with Exhibition Curator Lisa Slade.
$10 Members/conc., $15 non-members
RSVP: 02 4974 5123

 

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112

 







A Wynne for the Newcastle Region Art Gallery

 

Newcastle Region Art Gallery will acquire the controversial winning painting from the 2010 Wynne Prize, thanks to the generosity of a Newcastle business couple who wish to remain anonymous.

 

Proposal for landscaped cosmos by Melbourne artist SAM LEACH won the $25,000 art prize in March 2010, but drew criticism from sections of the art world for its close referencing of the 17th century painting Boatmen Moored on the Shore of an Italian Lake 1668 by Dutch artist ADAM PYNACKER.

 

The painting, which is consistent with Leach’s work in which he references the traditions and techniques of 17th century Dutch paintings, is small and detail-laden, and finished with a resin coating which forms a reflective and protective barrier, whilst drawing the viewer closer to the picture.

 

Leach is also the winner of this year’s Archibald prize. It is only the third time that an artist has won both the Archibald and the Wynne prizes in the same year, the first being WILLIAM DOBELL in 1948, while BRETT WHITELEY won the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes in 1978. Whiteley’s winning Wynne Prize entry from that year, Summer at Carcoar, is also held by the Newcastle Region Art Gallery, and the work of art has become one of the Gallery’s most iconic and best-loved works of art since its acquisition.

 

Proposal for landscaped cosmos has been gifted to the Gallery by a Dutch-born Novocastrian business man and his wife, who thought it an important acquisition for the Gallery’s collection. The painting will be on display in the Gallery in the near future. For details, visit the Gallery website www.nag.org.au

 

Read Germaine Greer's article on the scandal online, or download a PDF copy.

 


Sam Leach Proposal for landscaped cosmos 2010

Sam Leach Proposal for landscaped cosmos 2010
Winner, 2010 Wynne Prize




ARTEXPRESS HSC visual arts exhibition installed at Newcastle Region Art Gallery

 

ARTEXPRESS HSC visual arts exhibition

15 May - 1 August 2010

 

The future of art in Australia is on display in at the Newcastle Region Art Gallery this week, as the annual ARTEXPRESS HSC visual arts exhibition opens in the Gallery.


ARTEXPRESS is one of the most anticipated exhibitions to appear annually in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery calendar. It presents exemplary bodies of work created by students for the Higher School Certificate examination in Visual Arts. The works represent a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, ceramics, photomedia, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, graphic design, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, time-based forms and collections of works.


ARTEXPRESS was first shown in Newcastle 1982, supported by BHP and exhibited in the supper room at City Hall, the same year its was first shown at the Art Gallery of NSW. From 1992 on, the exhibition has been shown annually at the Newcastle Region Art Gallery, the only regional touring venue to do so.


This year, for the first time, ARTEXPRESS has been selected and curated by the Gallery. When considering the final exhibition, close attention was paid to bodies of work from the Newcastle region, in all fourteen local students are represented. Works were chosen that relate to the Gallery’s important and significant collection and that are also outstanding examples of art making across a diverse range of expressive forms.


The exhibition continues to be a positive reflection of young people's concerns and their creative voice, as well as exemplifying visual arts education in this state. Each year the diverse group of artists represented in the exhibition present vibrant and unexpected expressions, offering us surprising insights into their world.


It is also a nexus between visual arts education and professional art world. ARTEXPRESS bridges the gap between classroom activities and public presentation - between students’ developing art practice and that of professionals. This experience is inspiring and motivational, a pathway leading to lifelong connections with this Gallery and the visual arts world beyond.  


ARTEXPRESS is a much admired outcome of a sustained and deep experience in visual arts for students as well as a confirmation of the talent and professionalism of visual arts teachers.


ARTEXPRESS is presented in association with NSW Department of Education and Training and the Office of the Board of Studies NSW.


ARTEXPRESS 2010 is on display in the Gallery 15 May - 1 August 2010.


Download the
ARTEXPRESS 2010 Education Kit (6.3mb PDF)
Investigate the works of art and their Conversations with the Collection
Check out the Behind the Scenes photos

 

 ARTEXPRESS HSC visual arts exhibition installed at Newcastle Region Art Gallery




Conversations with the Collection

Rosemary Laing and Imogen Darling-Blair

 

ROSEMARY LAING
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection

Laing’s large-scale photographic panoramas absorb the body of the viewer and invite a potent re-reading of landscape traditions. bulletproofglass #3 is a staged performance that centres on what Laing describes as “our fraught sense of belonging”. A bride somersaults, falling through the air after being shot. Black birds encircle the falling figure and there is no sign of the horizon to quell our unease or provide a sense of scale of the tragedy before us. The motif of the bride continues Laing’s fascination with romantic and nostalgic imagery. Here the bride as a symbol of purity and promise is defiled; once again virgin territory is desecrated. Laing is not the first to tackle this imagery, Arthur Boyd’s flying brides and half-caste bride series as narratives of displacement are invoked here.

 


 

Imogen Darling-Blair Fictitious decay 2009 

IMOGEN DARLING-BLAIR 
Queenwood School for Girls
Fictitious decay
Photomedia

 

This is a story that contrasts a young woman’s fashion-conscious existence with her daily life played out against archetypal Australian male activities – lawn mowing, cricket playing, barbecuing … . Fictitious decay achieves a strong contrast between her clothes, her background story and context. Her dreams and imagination influence the images, seen for example in the animal life going on around her. This creates a kind of magical realism, bringing the characters to life with the aid of high dramatics and bringing a serial quality to life.

See Imogen Darling-Blair's Visual Arts process diary at the AGNSW website






Conversations with the Collection

Saturo Hoshino and Georgia Alexander

 

SATORU HOSHINO
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection

Satoru Hoshino was among a group of Japanese potters who were seeking to use clay as an expressive medium in its own right without the need to conform to a functional aesthetic. This group collectively exhibited their work as the Sodeisha Group in the 1950s.The Sodeisha Collection held by Newcastle Region Art Gallery consists of purely sculptural or non-functional objects that still express the particular qualities of clay and glaze which has influenced contemporary ceramics.

In 1978 an exhibition of works by Sodeisha artists toured Australia, organised by Newcastle Region Art Gallery. On completion of the tour the group donated work to Newcastle Region Art Gallery in recognition of the Gallery’s commitment to Japanese ceramics.


 

Georgia Alexander Modern trilogy 2009

Georgia Alexander
Pymble Ladies’ College
Modern trilogy 2009
Ceramics

 

The inspiration for my three sculptures came mainly from my love of simple, modern sculpture and design. The work was constructed with clay coils and slabs blended together, then highly polished by burnishing the fired work with stones and further polishing. The final black surface was achieved in the black fire kiln.








Kilgour Prize 2010

6 November 2010 - 16 January 2011

Dallas Bray is the winner of the KILGOUR PRIZE 2010 for figurative painting.

This biannual acquisitive painting prize is financed by the JN Kilgour bequest. The Prize encourages innovative figurative painting by Australian artists and awards $50,000 for the most outstanding work of art, as judged by a selection panel. A People’s Choice prize of $5,000 is also awarded.

Born in 1900, Kilgour is known for his academic modernism and his subjects include urban landscapes and portraiture. His contemporaries included Jean Bellette, William Dobell, Paul Haefliger, Eric Wilson and his wife Nancy Kilgour, with whom he established a significant artistic partnership. His work is well represented in the Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection, as well as in significant state and national collections.

The finalists in 2010 are Suzanne Archer, John Beard, Eolo Bottaro, Dallas Bray, Michael Bryant, Amber Carbury, Francis Celtlan, Nicola Dickson, Tarli Glover, Shellie Kelly, Steve Lopes, Helene Leane, William Mackinnon, Barry McCann, Evert Ploeg, Rodney Pople, Debbie Robinson, Ben Smith, Robin Stewart, Mark Thompson, Frances Wiedersatz, Alice Wormald and Salvatore Zofrea.

All entries were assessed by a panel of three selectors comprising of two independent judges, Ann Lewis AO arts patron, Daniel McOwen Director of Hamilton Art Gallery, Victoria and Ron Ramsey Director of Newcastle Region Art Gallery.

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 9 November
Artist Dallas Bray speaks on the importance of prizes in an artist’s career.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 30 November
One of the entrants in the Kilgour Prize 2010 will discuss the challenges of painting for a prize.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Children/youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am – 12.30pm
10 – 14 January
Ages 5-8, 9-12 and 13-16.
$22

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




Floor refurbishment

 

In February, our exhibition space will be reduced due to the refurbishment of the downstairs floors of the Art Gallery. During this time, we will feature a selection of works from the collection by Auguste Rodin, Bill Henson and Newcastle ceramist Madelaine Scott Jones.

 

We apologise for any inconvenience, and look forward to welcoming you back to the Gallery with a full exhibition program in March.

 

5 March – 8 May 2011
LESS IS MORE Morandi & Hanssen Pigott
ARTEXPRESS HSC visual arts exhibition

 

19 March – 29 May 2011
SPEAKING IN COLOUR
WILLIAM ROSE Composing space







Look Hear

6.00pm - 7.30pm
The first four Wednesdays in August
Free

A program of free lectures. Look Hear is an art and design event which brings together some of Australia's finest artists and designers for a month of inspiration and insight into the world of art and design. Come along to see presentations by some of the best industry professionals including artists, gallery professionals, graphic designers, illustrators, photographers and fashion designers.

For full details www.lookhear.com.au


Zoocraft







NEW ACQUISITIONS 2009 - 2011

26 November - 5 February 2012

Selected from works of art acquired by the Gallery between 2009 - 2011 this exhibition showcases and highlights the diverse and important additions to one of Australia’s most significant regional collections.

Adults
Artist Forum
2.00pm
Saturday 26 November
Being Acquired
Join artists Fiona MacDonald, Lucas Grogan and Michael Keighery, all recently had work acquired by the Gallery, in a discussion with Director Ron Ramsey about their individual work practices. Following the forum will be a fashion launch featuring the collaborative works by RITTENHOUSE and Lucas Grogan.
Free

Evaluation Day*
10.00am - 4.00pm
Wednesday 18 January
Visit the Gallery for our own version of Antiques Roadshow. Specialists from Deutscher & Hachett fine art auction house will be available to assess your precious objects.
Gold coin donation

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Family
Quick draw
3.00pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday - Fridays
10 – 20 January
Drawing workshops for those over 14.
Free

Children / youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am – 12.30pm
17 – 20 January
$15
See Workshops and Programs section for further details

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Bookings required for marked events
*Art Gallery 02 4974 5114
**Audience Programs 02 4974 5112




LEAVING A LEGACY Margaret Olley’s gifts to Newcastle

18 February - 15 April 2012

In the 1960s Margaret Olley fell in love with Newcastle and had a relationship with the city thereafter. Olley not only documented the city through her painting, she championed the arts and significantly contributed to the Gallery’s collection. Donating 48 works of art including some of her own paintings, many of the works are by important and well known artists or younger, emerging artists she deemed worthy of recognition. In honour of the artist and her tremendous contribution to the cultural life of the city, this exhibition showcases Olley’s generosity and support.

Adults
International Women’s Day
2.00pm
Thursday 8 March
A Generous Spirit: Margaret Olley Remembered Olley’s close friend art historian Christine France and the Gallery’s Curator discuss her work as both artist and benefactor.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Education
General tour available**
Free

Resources
Exhibition brochure available

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am – 12.00pm
Wednesday 7 March
$10 members, $15 non-members
Gallery Director Ron Ramsey discusses the generous donations made by Olley to the collection, and her support of young and emerging artists.

 

Bookings required for marked events
*Art Gallery 02 4974 5114
**Audience Programs 02 4974 5112




DESERT COUNTRY Art Gallery of South Australia travelling exhibition

16 March - 17 June 2012

Drawn from the Art Gallery of South Australia’s collection, this exhibition charts the forty year evolution of the internationally acclaimed Australian desert painting movement. The exhibition will include the watercolours of Albert Namatjira and his contemporaries along with contemporary artists Maringka Baker, Nura Rupert, Kunmanara Jimmy Baker and Tjungkara Ken.

Art Gallery of South Australia        Santos

Adults
Curator’s Talk
11.00am
Saturday 17 March
Join Curator Nici Cumpston for a walk through the exhibition.
Free

National Sorry Day Event
5.30pm
Saturday 26 May
Newcastle Art Gallery invites you to commemorate Sorry Day 2012, with The Newcastle City Council and Guraki Aboriginal Advisory Committee and the local Indigenous community. Enjoy a musical performance by Gambirra Illume, followed by a viewing of the documentary KANYINI, and a panel discussion in the exhibition.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Children / youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am - 12.30pm
17 - 20 April
$15
See Workshops and Programs section for further details

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Resources
smART Space resource centre
Childern’s Art Trail brochure


Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am - 12.00pm
Wednesday 4 April
$10 members, $15 non-members
Sarah Johnson, the Gallery's newly appointed curator, introduces the exhibition.

Bookings required for marked events
*Art Gallery 02 4974 5114
**Audience Programs 02 4974 5112




SHAY DOCKING Works from Newcastle collections

18 February - 15 April 2012

A focus exhibition of paintings and drawings by Shay Docking drawn from the Gallery’s collection and private collections in Newcastle. The exhibition will showcase both major paintings and intimate drawings – mostly of Newcastle. Shay Docking’s years as a resident of Newcastle were fundamental to the development of her ideas.

Adults
Exhibition Talk*
6.00pm
Friday 23 March
Join previous Director Gil Docking as he reminisces about his wife Shay with The Art Gallery Foundation Committee’s Gael Davies and Director Ron Ramsey.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Education
General tour available**
Free

 

Bookings required for marked events
*Art Gallery 02 4974 5114
**Audience Programs 02 4974 5112




Volunteer for ARTCART 2011


The Gallery is on the look-out for committed volunteers to help out with ARTCART - the Gallery's favourite family activity.


ARTCART volunteers love working with young children and their families to facilitate creation of a work of art in response to the Gallery’s current exhibitions. ARTCART volunteers are creative, great communicators, great listeners, have an interest in and enthusiasm for art and of course spare time every few weeks on a Saturday or Sunday. Preference will be giving to applicants with an education background. ARTCART Volunteers work with children aged between 3 to 10 years and will be subject to a working with children check. They are committed to the Gallery and to the community.


Application Due: Friday 1 July 2011


ARTCART runs between 10:30am and 12:30pm every Saturday and Sunday.


Download the ARTCART volunteer application form

 




smart space: for those who want to know more...

smart space is a dedicated education space on the first floor of the Art Gallery. It includes reading materials, information and children's activities intended to support  exhibition on display.





NORMAN LLOYD Another Life

27 August – 27 November 2011

An exploration of this largely forgotten Australian landscape painter, including an investigation of his early reception in Australia and his 'other' life in Europe.

Adults
Discussion Forum*
Memories of Lloyd
5.30pm
Friday 7 October
Join guest curator Margaret McBride and Norman Lloyd collector Paul Greenberg in conversation.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Education
General tour available**
Free

Resources
Exhibition brochure available

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am – 12.00pm
Wednesday 7 September
Margaret McBride highlights the career of this Newcastle-born artist.
$10 members, $15 non-members
payable at the door
RSVP essential 4974 5123 or gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au


Bookings required for marked events

* RSVP 02 4974 5114

** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




Be Italian with the Newcastle Region Art Gallery Redevelopment Raffle

 

Newcastle Region Art Gallery is giving Novocastrians the chance to win a brand new Vespa scooter decorated by a contemporary artist with 12 months free petrol, in support of the Art Gallery’s redevelopment.

 

The winner will receive a 2010 white Vespa LX125S, decorated by an artist of the Winner’s choice of contemporary artists Dallas Bray, Peter Gardiner, Brett McMahon or Kate Rohde, making the scooter a one-of-a-kind rarity unable to be acquired any other way.

 

This is the Gallery’s first ever Redevelopment Raffle, and all proceeds raised from the sale of tickets will go towards the Gallery’s building fund. Already, the community of Newcastle has helped raise over $750,000 towards the redevelopment, and continues to show significant support towards the project.

 

During February, much of the Gallery was closed to the public as the downstairs floors were refurbished, and the first exhibition to be displayed in the space opens to the public tomorrow.

 

“Refurbishing the floors of the exhibition space is the Gallery’s first step towards the redevelopment of the Art Gallery which will enable the permanent display of the significant collection. We have one of the most comprehensive collections of Australian art of any regional gallery in Australia, and with so many significant works of art in the collection, it is important that we have a building to match,” said Director Ron Ramsey.

 

The Redevelopment of the Gallery will see an upgrade to the Gallery to include a café, a retail outlet and improved display and storage facilities.

 

Tickets $5. Buy 2 get 1 free. Tickets available from the Gallery Shop or (02) 4974 5100 for more information.
Vespa donated by Experienced Office Furniture. Petrol supplied by Shell.

 

 Win a Vespa!




TOUCH The Portraiture of Dani Marti

17 September 2011 - 13 November 2012

In what can be described as ‘unorthodox ethnography’ Marti uses the Internet to meet people who then become his subjects. These encounters provide the inspiration for Marti’s portraiture which includes woven relief and free standing sculptures and video.

Adults
Artist Talk*
6.00pm
Friday 14 October
Artist Dani Marti and Assistant Director Tristan Sharp will discuss the artist's diverse and challenging practice.
Free

Exhibition Talk*
2.00pm
Saturday 5 November
Fibre artist and lecturer at the University of Newcastle, Faye Neilson, will contextualise Marti’s work internationally.|
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Family
Quick draw
3.00pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday - Fridays
27 September – 7 October
Drawing workshops for those over 14.
Free

Children / youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am - 12.30pm
4 - 7 October
$15
See Workshops and Programs section for further details

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Resources
Exposure - artist+student+documentary
smART space resource centre


Bookings required for marked events
*Art Gallery 02 4974 5114
**Audience Programs 02 4974 5112




AUSTRALIAN MODERN MASTERPIECES
From the Art Gallery of New South Wales

10 December 2011 – 4 March 2012

Selected from the collections of the Art Gallery of New South Wales and Newcastle Art Gallery, this exhibition presents over eighty icons of Australian modern art. Included in the exhibition are works by Arthur Boyd, Grace Cossington Smith, William Dobell, Russell Drysdale, Donald Friend, James Gleeson, Roy de Maistre, Sidney Nolan, Margaret Olley, John Olsen, Margaret Preston, Lloyd Rees, Jeffrey Smart, Roland Wakelin, Brett Whiteley, and Fred Williams. Newcastle Art Gallery is the only New South Wales venue for this exhibition.

An admission fee applies: $8 general public, $5 members/concession.

A partnership between Newcastle Region Art Gallery and Art Gallery of New South Wales.

Australian Modern Masterpieces installation



Newcastle Art Gallery would like to thank our exhibition sponsors & supporters.

AGNSW logo  Newcastle City Council
artsNSW L!vesites logo The Sebel Newcastle logo Silo logo Tamburlaine-2011-web
Bus Advertising FordComm logo The_Herald_logo100 ABC1233 NBN80
 


Adults
Masterpieces, Madmen and Martinis*
6.00pm
Friday 3 February
Put on a sharp suit or fabulous frock and sip cocktails with local celebrities as they discuss their favourite Masterpiece.
$45

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Family
Late night openings
5.30pm
Saturday 10 December and
Saturday 3 March
Join us in celebration of the exhibition Australian Modern Masterpieces with late night openings that include live music and performances in conjunction with LIVE SITES.
Free with exhibition entry fee.

L!vesites logo

Strike a Pose
2.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
14 January - 29 January 2012
Dobell’s The Strapper and Portrait of Margaret Olley come to life. Share their stories with Tantrum Theatre performers.
Free with exhibition entry fee.

Reminiscing the Modern
2.30pm
Sundays
15 January - 29 January
A variety of music to evoke the modern era.
Free with exhibition entry fee.

Quick draw
3.00pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday - Fridays
10 - 20 January
Drawing workshops for those over 14.
Free with exhibition entry fee.

Children / youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am - 12.30pm
10 - 13 January
$15
See Workshops and Programs section for further details

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Resources
smART space resource centre
Exposure - artist+student+documentary
Children’s Art Trail brochure

Art Gallery Society
Budburst/Artburst
6.00pm – 8.00pm
Friday 13 January
Hunter vignerons showcase their wines and discuss their favourite Modern Masterpieces.
$20 Members $25 Non-members
(includes entry to exhibition)
RSVP essential 4952 5763

Coffee with Art
10.30am - 12.30pm
Wednesday 1 February
$10 members, $15 non-members
Wayne Tunnicliffe, Head of Australian Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales, discusses the exhibition.

  

Bookings required for marked events
*Art Gallery 02 4974 5114
**Audience Programs 02 4974 5112




Visiting Indigenous artists carry on the Hermannsburg watercolour tradition at Newcastle Region Art Gallery

 

Two artists from the Ngurratjuta ‘Many Hands’ Art Centre in Alice Springs will visit Newcastle Region Art Gallery during the first week of May to work in the Gallery and to see the watercolours of their relatives currently on display in the exhibition Speaking in colour.

 

Lenie Namatjira, the daughter of Oscar Namatjira and grand-daughter of Western Arrernte painter Albert Namatjira, and Ivy Pareroultja, the daughter of Edwin Pareroultja, will visit the Gallery next week to see The Ntaria (Hermannsburg) Suite 1946-53, a recently acquired suite of twenty-seven watercolours from Hermannsburg near Alice Springs in which both Oscar Namatjira and Edwin Pareroultja are represented.

 

On Friday 6 May and Saturday 7 May, both artists will spend the morning painting new works of art in the Gallery, whilst participating in an informal conversation for the public with Speaking in colour curator Una Rey and Iris Bendor from Ngurratjuta Art Centre.

 

The watercolours found in The Ntaria (Hermannsburg) Suite are being exhibited publicly for the first time in Speaking in colour and they reveal the collective artists’ skill in rendering their local landscape in colour and light.

 

This tradition has continued in the work of Lenie Namatjira and Ivy Pareroultja, as well as over 400 other artists who form the Ngurratjuta Many Hands Art Centre. The Art Centre maintains a special focus on supporting the Hermannsburg School watercolourists, following the practice of Albert Namatjira and his peers.

 

Ngurratjuta’s artists come from a wide geographical area west of Alice Springs. The artworks tell many different stories and are completed in a variety of styles, from the landscape watercolours to fine dot work and bold contemporary paintings.

 

PROGRAM
Friday 6 May 2011 and Saturday 7 May 2011, 11.00am – 1.00pm

Ivy Pareroultja and Lenie NamatjIra from the Ngurratjuta Art Centre will be working in the Gallery.
Curator of Speaking in Colour Una Rey and Iris Bendor from the Ngurratjuta Art Centre will facilitate an informal discussion with the artists while they work. Visitors will have the opportunity to ask questions and interact with the artists.
School groups are encouraged to attend the Friday program. Book on 02 4974 5114.
Speaking in colour is on display in the Gallery until 29 May 2011.




SAVING FACE Portraits from the collection

17 September - 13 November 2011

What is a portrait? Does it only offer an insight into the subject or is it equally about the artist who created it? Drawn from the Gallery’s collection, this exhibition will explore the notion of ‘portraiture’ and its interpretations across time and media.

Adults
Portrait workshop with artist
Carolyn McKay**
10.00am - 2.00pm
Sunday 16 October
$40 per participant
RSVP essential

Exhibition Talk*
2.00pm
Saturday 22 October
Portraiture: primal to digital
Artist and academic Carolyn McKay will discuss the history of portraiture.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays

Free

Family
Quick draw
3.00pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday - Fridays
27 September – 7 October

Drawing workshops for those over 14.
Free

Art Gallery Society
Is anyone there?
6.00pm – 7.30pm
Friday 28 October
Robert Dessaix, writer, translator and broadcaster reflects upon what a portrait can capture. Do portrait painters just paint “what is there” or do they paint “who” is there?
Refreshments will be served.
$25 members, $35 non-members
RSVP essential 4974 5123 or
gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au

 

Bookings required for marked events
*Art Gallery 02 4974 5114
**Audience Programs 02 4974 5112




VERSO

27 August - 27 November 2011

Explore the treasures hidden on the backs of paintings and works on paper held in the Gallery’s collection. Verso includes works by Grace Cossington Smith, Roy De Maistre, Elioth Gruner, J N Kilgour, Nancy Kilgour, Jesse Martin and Roderick Shaw.


Adults
Discussion Forum*
Behind the frame
5.30pm
Friday 24 September
Join Alan Lloyd former Head Conservator, Art Gallery of New South Wales for insights into the world of conservation and the discoveries he has made about works of art, and the artists who made them.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Education
General tour available**
Free

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




Australian celebrities to take centre stage at the Newcastle Art Gallery’s Masterpieces, Mad Men & Martinis Night

 

Dress up in a sharp suit or fabulous frock and sip martinis with Kamahl as he talks about his favourite works of art from the Newcastle Art Gallery’s Australian Modern Masterpieces exhibition. Playing MC for the night is comedian Steve Abbott (aka The Sandman), while Swing band Ultra Swing Lounge will provide their own interpretation of this retro-modern era.

 

Taking its cue from the hit television series Mad Men, the Newcastle Art Gallery will serve martinis and 1960’s style canapés prepared by Silo Restaurant and Lounge while guests are treated to guided tours of the iconic Australian works of art amidst the rhythms of the local jazz trio.

 

Ron Ramsey, Newcastle Art Gallery Director said:

“The modern era was fun and frivolous. It captured the feeling that Australia was on the verge of something new and original, no longer held back by its colonial past. We have tried to capture this feeling with this event, with a fun and eclectic line-up of much loved Australian figures, giving their insights into this very important exhibition.”

 

Kamahl’s music has crossed three generations and has recently experienced a renaissance with the younger Australians after performing recently at The Big Day Out festival across Australia.

 

Novocastrian comedian Steve Abbott better known as the much loved Sandman is thrilled to pair up with Kamahl:

“Good music, great food, martinis and Kamahl… it is going to be a very fun night.”

 

Included in the Australian Modern Masterpiece exhibition are works by Grace Cossington Smith, William Dobell, Russell Drysdale, James Gleeson, Sidney Nolan, Margaret Olley, John Olsen, Brett Whiteley, and Fred Williams.

 

Masterpieces, Mad Men & Martinis
6pm 3 February 2012
Tickets $45, available at the Gallery

A Newcastle Art Gallery and Silo Restaurant and Lounge partnership

 

AUSTRALIAN MODERN MASTERPIECES from the Art Gallery of New South Wales is on until 4 March

 




About these pages


This webpage supports the exhibition, Illumination The art of Philip Wolfhagen A Newcastle Art Gallery and Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery travelling exhibition.

Designed in conjunction with the Illumination The art of Philip Wolfhagen Education kit, this webpage provides insight into the materials, artists, music and places that are important to Wolfhagen, and is recommended as an additional resource for teachers and students or for general public use.


Surveying the twenty five year career of Australian painter Philip Wolfhagen, Illumination The art of Philip Wolfhagen explores the artist’s enchantment with the Australian landscape, the tactility and intimacy of his painting process, his command of colour and use of signature devices such as the split picture plane.


Wolfhagen’s work is held in major public and corporate collections in Australia and in private collections nationally and internationally, with the largest national public collection of his work currently owned by the Newcastle Art Gallery.


Newcastle Art Gallery strongly supports experience-based learning and advises that this webpage be used in conjunction with a visit to the exhibition.



For exhibition dates please see the tour schedule below.

NEWCASTLE ART GALLERY, NSW
22 June - 11 August 2013

TASMANIAN MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, TAS
13 September - 1 December 2013

THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY DRILL HALL GALLERY, ACT
20 February - 6 April 2014

CAIRNS REGIONAL GALLERY, QLD
9 May - 6 July 2014

TWEED RIVER ART GALLERY, NSW
8 August - 12 October 2014

HAMILTON ART GALLERY, VIC
15 November 2014 - 1 February 2015

GIPPSLAND ART GALLERY, VIC
14 February - 12 April 2015 







Conversations with the Collection

Richard Browne & Sigrid Wharton

 

RICHARD BROWNE

Born in Dublin in 1771, Richard Browne was sentenced to transportation in 1810, arriving in Sydney in 1811. From there he was transported to Newcastle for committing a second offence and remained there until 1817. In this watercolour Browne has given a face to the first people of the Hunter River region and provided valuable insights into our local history.

In his portrait of Coola-benn, Browne has used a profile bust portrait format to commemorate the Ash Island leader. This cameo style of portraiture, which was popular from the Classical period onwards, was frequently used in the depiction of powerful individuals.


 

SIGRID WHARTON
Asquith Girls High School
The Alternative: The Requiem of a Classical Cure (detail) (2010)
Painting

My body of work expresses my deep interest in the theories of Carl Jung regarding the unconscious mind and the archetypes that go with this. I have always been fascinated by romanticism and the idea of opposites as shown in my work, where there is a play on opposites relating to gender, love and despair, laughter and sadness. I have drawn together the threads of my passion for classical and contemporary music, painting, film and opera to tell a story of an individual who experiences a surreal series of events that show the extreme effects of deep emotion.

 

Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.




Conversations with the Collection

Allan Chawner & Alicia Floyer

ALLAN CHAWNER

Allan Chawner spent years photographing the beaches of Newcastle before the June 2007 storms presented him with the ultimate photographic opportunity. The grounding of the bulk carrier, the Pasha Bulker, on Nobbys Beach created an unprecedented public spectacle and tens of thousands of onlookers visited and photographed the ruin. In Pasha wave 2007 Chawner chooses to focus closely on the ocean and the grounded hull of the ship. This image is printed on a massive scale when exhibited and as such underscores the conflict or duel between nature and industry.


 

ALICIA FLOYER
Jesmond Campus
Facets of the Bogey Hole (detail) (2010)
Painting

My oil paintings are a series of seascapes depicting the iconic and unique imagery of the “Bogey Hole” in Newcastle. I wanted people to be able to visualise the beautiful coastline we have to offer in Newcastle. I wanted to capture the beauty and uniqueness of the “Bogey Hole”. I was inspired by the bold and changing colours of this well know local landscape. I was aiming to create an artwork that was so realistic yet so surreal.


Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.




Coversations with the Collection

Philip Wolfhagen and Natalie Ullman


PHILIP WOLFHAGEN

Philip Wolfhagen’s painting is inspired by the elemental power and presence of land, sky and sea. Surface tension no. 3 1998 explores the potency of ocean and has a particular resonance for many Australian’s whose sense of place is orientated toward the coast. Born in Tasmania and descended from a long line of northern Tasmanian settlers, the sea for Wolfhagen is a particularly significant symbol. To create the depth and movement of the ocean Wolfhagen uses oil and beeswax together. In his own words, I love the power of the illusory mark and its emotive energy and I feel confident about my ability to harness that energy.
 


 

NATALIE ULLMANN
Ravenswood School
Sea of Shame(detail) (2010)
Painting

The natural beauty of the world’s environment is distorted by the unconscious, destructive actions of mankind. Underneath the crystal clear creeks, tranquil rivers and vast oceans, lies the ugly and shameful truth of our environment, caused by the selfish behaviours of human beings which is nothing to be proud of. If the environment is not well looked after, the representations of beauty in this world would be left to the artificial manipulations of men as the natural world is destroyed.

 

Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.




GRACE COSSINGTON SMITH a focus exhibition

5 March - 8 May 2011

This focus exhibition presents the Gallery’s significant collection of paintings by Grace Cossington Smith, including two new acquisitions shown for the first time.




OUT OF THE SHADOWS figurative sculpture and photography

22 January - 6 March 2011

 

In this exhibition we combine works by two artists - a sculptor and a photographer – Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) and Bill Henson (born 1955) both at the peak of their careers albeit over a century apart. Out of the shadows explores the emergence and depiction of the human form through dramatic use of light and shade. We see the human form evolve from deep gouges made into the clay, from which the bronze was cast, and also from the brooding, festering landscapes in which young naked forms play out an almost sinister drama before the camera.




ARTEXPRESS HSC visual arts exhibition

 

5 March - 8 May 2011

 

The annual exhibition of HSC works of art, including the outstanding work of Hunter Visual Arts students. Selected and curated by the Gallery and presented in association with NSW Department of Education and Training and the Office of the Board of Studies NSW.

ARTEXPRESS Major Sponsor: Endeavour Energy. Support Sponsors: S&S Creativity unlimited and the University of Western Sydney. Press Media Partner: The Sydney Morning Herald. Television Partner: Television Sydney(TVS). Official Artexpress Carrier: Grace.
Patron: the Sir William Dobell Art Foundation.

Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Kit.
Investigate the works of art and their Conversations with the Collection.
Check out the
ARTEXPRESS 2011 site to see interviews with the artists and more.
Go to the Department of Education and Training ARTEXPRESS web page.
Get the ARTEXPRESS Gallery Guide.

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 15 March
Teacher and member of the Gallery’s ARTEXPRESS selection panel Anna Scobie goes behind the scenes at ARTEXPRESS.
$22, $15 Society members/conc.

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays

Free

Education
Youth Week artist talks*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Friday 1 April
Artists featured in ARTEXPRESS 2011 discuss their experience.
Free 

Visual Art Teachers' Day - ARTEXPRESS Regional Tour
9.30am – 4.00pm
Monday 21 March
Curriculum Concerns: A Professional Learning Opportunity for teachers of visual arts in association with ARTEXPRESS
Cost (includes lunch): Teachers $100. Student teachers $70.
For information contact Lyn Cook: Region Arts Coordinator DET
lyn.cook2@det.nsw.edu.au

Focus tour available**
Free

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




Conversations with the Collection

Grace Cossington Smith & Anna Nowland

GRACE COSSINGTON SMITH

Grace Cossington Smith lived all her life in the same house in Sydney and the house, its interiors and environs, are an abiding subject across her long career as an artist. Her interior paintings from the 1950s are often heralded as her greatest triumph. This small snow stricken landscape was painted in Europe, during a visit in 1949-1950, before she commenced the domestic interiors. The reduced complimentary palette and mosaic style brush strokes pre-empt the later, luminous interiors. The painting carries a working sketch of a still life on the reverse of the board, testimony to the artist’s ongoing experimentation during her travels.



ANNA NOWLAND
Ravenswood School
Traces and Tracks (2010)
Painting

This artwork is an exploration of the diversity of the alpine heathland landscape, located in the Kosciusko National Park region. It examines this natural grassland area for its untouched character that yields unexpected colours, patterns and forms, creating natural lines and paths in the landscape. This outlook is affected by seasons and weather conditions that generate a complete alteration in the landscape through colour, light and dark, and structure. To present this I used acrylic and oil paints, carving, and pigmented paraffin wax, to create the traces and tracks that inform this unique environment.


Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.




Conversations with the Collection

Louise Hearman & Oliviere Jane Trubie

LOUISE HEARMAN

The tension between the seen and unseen, the knowable and unknown, is a dynamic present in the work of Melbourne based artist Louise Hearman. In Untitled #680 1998 darkness surrounds - an unidentified object shoots forth from behind the trees lighting the tumultuous beach below, while the moon hangs low in the sky. Untitled #680 is unnamed, like all of Hearman’s paintings. It is identifiable only by its opus number. This intentional resistance to explaining the work via its title is a further nod to the mysteries contained within the darkness of the paintings, which remain present but unreadable.


OLIVIERE JANE TRUBIE
Mosman High School
Fitzroy (detail) (2010)
Painting

Recent travels to Melbourne bought to light for me a new, darkened perspective of the back streets of Fitzory. I want to delve into the strong, moody atmosphere of the landscape which is often associated with the underground graffiti and art culture. With my art making process I experimented with acrylics mediums. Manipulating various techniques, approaches and elements of chiaroscuro to ultimately establish this unique composition. The entire creative experience is something I will continue to value.


Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.




Conversations with the Collection

Fiona Hall & Romina Lyn You Lee

FIONA HALL

In Fiona Hall’s Drift net 1998 a two-tiered glass display cabinet contains three solitary objects; on the top shelf a bough of bleached coral is intricately crafted from glass beads and mother of pearl buttons, a glass bottle is engraved with the names of seaweeds and ships’ knots and on the bottom shelf, serpentine plumbing conduit, perforated beyond use, holds a compass at its end. These three objects lie stranded within the cabinet as dubious trophies of progress. Drift net is a contemporary critique of environmental devastation. The work continues Hall’s fascination with natural history and colonisation as a gigantic trans-continental drift net that catches everything in its wake.


ROMINA LYN YOU LEE
Abbotsleigh Wahroonga
The Great Bleached Reef (detail) (2010)
Sculpture

The Great Bleached Reef emulates the skeletal forms of dead coral, that are a result of coral bleaching. Coral bleaching occurs when the coral polyp dies, draining the coral of its colour and leaving the white calcium carbonate structure exposed. My sculptures draw attention to this serious environmental concern which threatens Australia’s most remarkable natural wonder, the Great Barrier Reef. I have used a range of materials to create the artwork such as bubble wrap, Styrofoam and doilies, and my intention is to delight and surprise the viewer by transforming refuse into beautiful works of art.


Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.




Conversations with the Collection

Robyn Stacey & Georgia Stanton

ROBYN STACEY

Robyn Stacey’s large and lustrous photographs restage the collections of former generations. Among her subjects are the gardens and collections of Alexander Macleay, appointed as colonial secretary of New South Wales in 1826. The Macleay collections of bulbous plants, which proliferated in the now lost botanic gardens at Elizabeth Bay House in Sydney, provided Stacey with the inspiration for Bombe (cape bulbs) 2009. The title of the work (Bombe) refers to the baroque styled vase, which rests on an example of Australian red cedar furniture from around 1820. Stacey revives the tradition of still life, a genre of painting that was at the height of its powers and popularity in seventeenth century Holland. The presence of fruit, flowers and often insects communicated the brevity of life and the inevitability of death in these vanitas paintings from the past – Stacey consciously reworks these traditions in her practice.


GEORGIA STANTON
Loreto Kirribilli
“If there is nothing from the first, where does the dust collect itself?” Hui-neng
Photomedia

My body of work is an exploration of the cycle of life. I was interested in the way the human life never ends and through death we give rise to another cycle. Through my work I also wanted to express the impact of nature providing various intersecting cycles which add to the complexity of the human life. Artists such as Bill Viola and Bill Henson inspired my work through their highly emotive artworks that emphasise the intensity of a black background illuminating and engulfing the subjects in an eerie atmosphere. My work attempts to replicate these features through my choice of digital camera equipment and Photoshop manipulation which has allowed for heightened shadows in the chiaroscuro style - a main feature of the Vanitas tradition, another major influence to my work. The title of my work is a reference to the work created by Xu bing which used the dust he collected in Chinatown (Manhattan) after 9/11.


Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.







Conversations with the Collection

Jonathan Jones & Jessica Jane Bolton

JONATHAN JONES

In 68 Fletcher, Bondi, 20:20, 8.6.03 2003 Jonathan Jones uses domestic light bulbs and fittings to illuminate traditional Aboriginal concerns of country. A member of the Kamilaroi and Wiradjuri nations, Jones uses light as a metaphor for the relationship between individual and community. Though his language groups are of central New South Wales, the artist grew up in the urban environment of Sydney’s beaches. Here the Bondi headland is traced in light with each light signifying human habitation. Jones sees these luminous markers as a type of census and as a physical manifestation of the interconnectedness of all people and all communities.


JESSICA JANE BOLTON
Hunter Valley Grammar
Tunnel Vision (detail) (2010)
Sculpture

“Vietnam, that’s a war not a country right?” This is a perplexity that I struggled to comprehend after reflecting upon my travels in Vietnam in 2009. The Vietnamese perspective that the 2nd Indochinese War was the ‘American War’ encouraged me to explore differing social interpretations of this event. I aim to encourage my audience to explore the true nature of Vietnam, looking beyond the stereotypical sensationalist media images in order to investigate contemporary Vietnam and realise that a country ravaged by successive wars is home to unique and ancient cultures with strong connections to the land, heritage and lifestyle.


Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.




Conversations with the Collection

Marea Gazzard & Alicia Cale

MAREA GAZZARD

Form and its infinite associations fascinate ceramicist Marea Gazzard. Ancient Cycladic talismans, Aboriginal grinding stones and traditional still life painting all inspire her sculptural ceramics. Each sculpted object bears the mark of Gazzard’s hand; clay is scraped, pinched, pummelled and punctured to suggest the external and elemental forces at work in the creation of land mass. Gazzard’s works from the Helmut series straddle landscape and figuration. While the title and the head-like forms anthropomorphise these vessels the shape of each object is also reminiscent of seedpods and eucalyptus branches. Hence Gazzard draws a connection between people and a sense of place that is specifically Australian.


ALICIA CALE
Pymble Ladies’ College
Rustic Vessels (2010)
Ceramics

This piece of work is a reflection of the contemporary Australian society and its expanding multicultural aspect of life, in which I have explored the idea of urban growth and decline, portraying this through the corrosive quality of the work and also through the incorporation of different glazes. The incongruous elements are representative of the mixture in Australian society in which iconic ideas of Australian culture and Indigenous culture are strongly intertwined. This mixture is depicted with rustic features such as chains, bolts and screws with the contemporary appropriation of a vessel figure.


Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.




Conversations with the Collection

Laith McGregor & Chris Wilson

LAITH McGREGOR

Laith McGregor uses the ubiquitous biro, or ballpoint pen, to make art. The biro is a tool that, although used daily, is rarely used as a serious drawing implement. Similarly, beards are rarely the subject of contemporary works of art. Hirsute men however, have become McGregor’s signature. In Dreamin’ about a place I’ll never see 2007 McGregor combines a self portrait with a willow pattern inspired landscape. Imported from China during the last half of the eighteenth century and appropriated by English potteries, the willow pattern is an eloquent emblem of cultural translation and in this work becomes an uncanny double image as both beard and dreamland.



CHRIS WILSON
The Entrance Campus
Liquid Refreshment (detail) (2010)
Drawing

The concept behind my body of work was to express the journey experienced by surfers, I tried to display a sense of freedom and motion through my pen strokes to create depth to represent and capture my individual experience. My passion for the ocean and also the movie “Morning of the Earth” inspired me. To create my body of work I used every available moment including free periods to get guidance or other points of view, in between drawing I would go surf and evaluate my images and visualise changes needed which is heavily linked to my concept.


Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.




Conversations with the Collection

Sean Cordeiro and Claire Healy & Charlotte Minnett

SEAN CORDEIRO AND CLAIRE HEALY

The material constructions, deconstructions and reconstructions of familiar objects within the gallery space by collaborators Sean Cordeiro and Claire Healy question our attachment to place and property. In The plastic menagerie 2006 Cordeiro and Healy have constructed a nest of museum showcases or vitrines and housed within each vitrine is an animal shaped inflatable toy, the type usually found poolside. Each vitrine is made from laminated pine, the type of material used to make inexpensive, ubiquitous furniture. Rather than the elegant handcrafted vitrines of the museum, these ‘storage solutions’ have a certain DIY appeal.



CHARLOTTE MINNETT
Ascham School
Hope 2010
Collection of works

My work explores the links between optimism and suffering and shows the audience that to construct hope is a choice one always has, regardless of their situation. Cranes, as a symbol of hope, came from the well-known story of Sadako and the 1000 paper cranes. Within this story the most inspiring quality for me was the persistence and blind optimism that Sadako maintains. The story behind the willow pattern designs on which my drawings were based, is one of love and perseverance. The umbrella is used to symbolize protection against negative situations, a barrier preventing the destruction of hope.


Download the ARTEXPRESS 2011 Education Resource.




Conversations with the Collection

Dani Marti and Rebeca Senatilaka

 

DANI MARTI
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection

Before training as a painter Dani Marti spent time in Barcelona learning traditional tapestry techniques. In George 2001 Marti has woven together industrial polymer ropes in fluorescent yellow and orange to create a non representational portrait. In the plaiting and weaving of synthetic fibres we search for evidence of George and are reminded of how often we associate those nearest and dearest with their clothing, its texture and scent. Like a CSI close up, we are invited into a microcosmic and intimate encounter.

Marti’s tactile works are often associated with particular people in the artist’s life and even though they refuse to portray a subject in the manner of conventional portraiture, they emanate with a sense of character and the feel of personality.

 


REBECA SENATILAKA
Ignorance is strength
Sculpture
Hurlstone Agricultural High School Glenfield

Buddhists identified ignorance as the root of suffering. My artwork explores how ignorance can twist reality, cloud judgement and result in negative emotions. The mass media play a significant role in our society, informing and persuading a wide audience – but the truth is often blanketed by cynicism and ambiguity. It encourages society’s ignorance. It dominates the space, but the blanket itself is fragile: the truth does escape. Each letter reinforces the other, some break away attempting to distinguish themselves. Attachments to the others restricts its meaning, urging resistance from worldly attachments.








LAVERTY 2

14 May - 14 August 2011

This exhibition revisits the extraordinary collection of Colin and Elizabeth Laverty, showcasing the best of their contemporary collection with both Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian art on display. LAVERTY 2 includes artists such as Sally Gabori, Rosalie Gascoigne, Louise Hearman, Emily Kam Kngwarreye, Ildiko Kovacs, Richard Larter, Noel McKenna, William Robinson, Aida Tomescu and Ken Whisson.


Adults
NAIDOC Week Event
6.00pm
Thursday 7 July
Celebrate the annual National Aborigines and Islanders Day at the Gallery with The Newcastle City Council Guraki Committee.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Children / youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am - 12.30pm
12 – 15 July
$15
See School holidays section for further details

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Resources
Exhibition brochure available
smART space resource centre

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am - 12.30pm
Wednesday 1 June
Jane Kleimeyer talks about her mother Liz, step-father Colin and the Laverty’s extraordinary contemporary collection of Australian art.
$10 members, $15 non-members
payable at the door
RSVP essential 4974 5123 or
gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112







Exposure

Artist + Student + Documentary Project
DVD Resource

The Exposure video project is a partnership between Newcastle Art Gallery and Callaghan College, Jesmond Senior Campus. Year 11 students work closely with their Visual Art teachers and Gallery staff to prepare questions to interview exhibiting artists in the Gallery, as well as in their studios. This project provides these students with an insight into the art world and the role of practicing artists; while creating an important educational resource to accompany exhibitions.

This project is proudly sponsored by BMT Tax Depreciation Quantity Surveyors.

BMT Tax Depreciation logo

 

ARTEXPRESS 2012
5 May - 1 July 2012


 

 

 

 
Australian Modern Masterpieces from the Art Gallery of New South Wales
10 December 2011 - 4 March 2012
Interview with Deborah Edwards, Senior Curator of Australian Art
Art Gallery of New South Wales


 
TOUCH The portraiture of Dani Marti
17 September - 13 November 2011 


SURFACE TENSION The art of Euan Macleod 1991-2009
27 August - 16 October 2011 







TREASURES OF NEWCASTLE FROM THE MACQUARIE ERA

2 March 2013 – 5 May 2013

A State Library of New South Wales and Newcastle Art Gallery partnership exhibition
Sponsored by Noble Resources International Australia

The exhibition Treasures of Newcastle from the Macquarie era features rarely seen artworks and maps telling the fascinating story of the development of the early colony to Newcastle. It also features the recently discovered Wallis album and the iconic Macquarie Collectors Chest which will return to Newcastle for the first time in 195 years to be displayed beside the Newcastle Chest – a contemporary response.

Highlights include rare images of Awabakal people, paintings of Newcastle by convict artist Joseph Lycett, early views of Nobbys and a stunning panorama of the city by Edward Close.

Treasures of Newcastle from the Macquarie era aims to share the fascinating and little-known stories of Newcastle’s origins as a coal centre, major port and cultural centre.

Download the education kit, and accompanying image kit. We also have an art trail. Click here to see a slideshow of the drawers of the Macquarie Collector's Chest (also available at the bottom of this page).


State Library of NSW logo      Noble Resources logo


TURNING THE PAGES, OPENING THE DRAWERS
Revisit the Gallery after each of these dates to see specific pages of the Skottowe Manuscript and Wallis Album, or different drawers of the Macquarie Collector’s Chest.
14 March, 28 March, 11 April & 25 April

 

TEACHER’S SESSION
Educator’s information session with Elizabeth Ellis
Tuesday 5 March
5.30pm - 6.30pm

Free
Bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Come to this information session to hear exhibition curator Elizabeth Ellis explain key aspects of the exhibition. Gather free education resources, be introduced to the Gallery’s Audience Programs staff, and enjoy time with colleagues from the region.

 

SOCIETY EVENT
Coffee with Art
Wednesday 6 March
10.30am - 12.00pm

$10 members, $15 non-members payable at the door
RSVP required
Call 4974 5123
Elizabeth Ellis, Emeritus Curator at the Mitchell Library, Sydney and curator of the exhibition looks at treasures from Governor Macquarie’s era.

 

TREASURED TALKS
A five-part series of perspectives
Tuesday evenings
6.00pm – 7.30pm
12 March – 9 April

$10 per talk, or $40 for the series
Bookings required, payment must be made at time of booking
Call 4974 5100

Tuesday 12 March
Taxidermist Vivian Barbeau discusses the Macquarie Collector’s Chest and the history of the preservation of birds and animals.
Tuesday 19 March

Richard Neville, State Library of NSW Mitchell Librarian, speaks on the impact of the Macquarie era upon modern day Australia.
Tuesday 26 March
Shane Frost, Awabakal descendant presents an Indigenous perspective on the exhibition and works by Richard Browne.
Tuesday 2 April
Jan Noble AM, speaks on the unique nature of Australian botanicals, as seen in the Wallis Album.
Tuesday 9 April
Margot Riley, State Library of NSW curator and fashion expert, speaks on early Australian dress codes and its impact on the colony.

 

SENIORS WEEK EVENT
Afternoon tea and tour
Thursday 21 March
2.00pm - 4.00pm

Free (seniors only event) Bookings required
Call 4974 5100
The Gallery invites seniors to a complimentary afternoon tea and free guided tour of Treasures of Newcastle from the Macquarie era.

 

ELIZABETH ELLIS TALK & BOOK SIGNING
in partnership with Newcastle Writer's Festival
Sunday 7 April
2.00pm - 3.00pm

Free
Bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Elizabeth Ellis, Emeritus Curator at the Mitchell Library, will speak on her experiences researching and writing the book Rare & Curious: The secret history of Governor Macquarie’s Collectors’ Chest.

 

TORCHLIGHT TOUR
For children and families
Saturday 13 April
6.00pm – 7.30pm

Free
Bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Enjoy the exhibitions in a whole new light. Gallery educators presenting children’s art activities and Gallery guides providing tours, all by torchlight.

 

SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS
For children 5-7 years old
Tuesday 16, Wednesday 17, Thursday 18, Tuesday 23 & Wednesday 24 April
10.30am – 12.30pm

Thursday 18 April only
2.30pm – 4.30pm
For children 8-10 years old
Tuesday 16, Wednesday 17, Tuesday 23 &
Wednesday 24 April
2.30pm – 4.30pm
$15 per child
Bookings required
Payment must be made at time of booking
Call 4974 5100
Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by the exhibition. Children will take part in a ‘treasure hunt’ and later use the items found as inspiration for assemblage style artworks, or, arrange their own compositions using collage as a basis for further art making. More information at time of booking.

 

QUICKDRAW
For high school aged young people
Friday 19, Saturday 20, Friday 26, Saturday 27 April
3.00pm - 4.30pm

Free
No bookings required, all materials supplied
Call 4974 5100
Free drawing sessions inspired by watercolours and sketches of flora and fauna found in the Skottowe manuscript and the Wallis Album.

 

SOCIETY EVENT
Coffee with Art
Wednesday 1 May
10.30am – 12.00pm

$10 members, $15 non-members payable at the door
RSVP required
Call 4974 5123
Gionni Di Gravio, Archivist and Chair – Coal River Working Party Cultural Collections at the University of Newcastle will reveal more from the exhibition.

 

NEWCASTLE & HUNTER STUDIES SYMPOSIUM
in partnership with the Humanities Research Institute, University of Newcastle
Friday 3 May
10.00am – 4.30pm

Registration: 10.00am
Free. Registration is required.
Call 4974 5100 or
email


Histories of Newcastle and the Hunter Valley have been largely absent from the national story yet the region’s history is valuable in itself and in its contribution to understanding of significant national and transnational themes.

This symposium brings together high quality scholarly histories and cultural studies of the region and communicates them to a wide academic audience. It is the first stage in a longer term project to introduce Newcastle and Hunter Studies into Australian national historiography. The symposium comprises of six formal academic papers, discussion time and a discussion panel to conclude the day.

Papers
Mark Dunn - Aboriginal Guides in the Hunter Valley
Lisa Ford and David Roberts - Newcastle and the Transformation of Penal Practice in the Colony of New South Wales
David Murray - Words for the Heat of Deeds: Creative non fiction and the writing of cultural history
Helen English - Music, Power and Public Space: a Case Study in Newcastle, NSW
Gaye Sheather - Local Sites and Sounds:  A History of live mainstream music in licenced venues in Newcastle, NSW, during Australia’s Oz Rock Era (1970s and 80s)
Keri Glastonbury - Rough and Tumblr: Blogging Newcastle

Panel Discussion
Chair: Julie McIntyre

Free. Registration is required.
10.00am registration. Call 4974 5100.

 

GALLERY OPEN LATE
All exhibitions
Saturday 4 May
5.30pm – 9.00pm

Free
To celebrate the close of Collection companions and Treasures of Newcastle from the Macquarie era, visit the Gallery after hours to enjoy musical performances, guided tours and a range of other programs for visitors of all ages.

 

TAKE IT HOME
Newcastle Chest card pack
(5 cards) $14.95
Macquarie Collector's Chest pack (12 postcards) $14.95
Joseph Lycett Inner view of Newcastle 1818 $3.50 per card or $12 poster

 

GLEE @ THE GALLERY
For the duration of the Treasures of Newcastle from the Macquarie era exhibition, enjoy a coffee or a sandwich served to you by Glee Coffee Roasters, amongst contemporary works of art from the collection.
Cafe
open 2 March until 5 May 2013
Tuesday to Sunday
10.00am - 3.00pm
Newcastle Art Gallery Society members receive a 10% discount on all purchases from the cafe.

 
Look inside the Macquarie Collector's Chest with this presentation.







Volunteers

Newcastle Art Gallery relies on the help of a small and dedicated team of volunteers to provide children and family programs such as ArtCart and school holiday activities, and free guided exhibition tours to school groups and other interested parties.

There are two types of volunteers at Newcastle Art Gallery.

The Gallery Guides program recruits every two years, and is a long term commitment (3 years+). Guides meet and train weekly, and commit at least 2-3 shifts per month to provide Guided tours and information to audiences of all ages.

The ArtCart volunteer program recruits every six months, and is a mid to long term commitment (12 months+). Volunteers meet and train every two months, and commit at least one shift a fortnight to support Gallery staff at special Education events, weekend art activities and school holiday events.

Our volunteers dedicate their time and energy to the Gallery, and without them we would not be able to present the rich program that we currently do.

To find out more about these positions, or to register your interest in being considered for the next round of volunteer recruitment, please send a current CV and a cover letter to artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au




ILLUMINATION The art of Philip Wolfhagen

22 June - 11 August 2013

A Newcastle Art Gallery and Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery travelling exhibition
Sponsored by Visions Australia

The first major survey of Australia's pre-eminent contemporary landscape painter, Philip Wolfhagen. Featuring fifty works from public and private collections, Wolfhagen's ethereal and timeless landscapes depict a specific connection to land.

The exhibition explores the continuity of the landscape painting tradition commenced in Tasmania by Eugene von Guerard and John Glover, and its relevance in contemporary Australian art.

To support this exhibition, Newcastle Art Gallery has created an online education resource that provides insight into the materials, artists, music and places that are important to Wolfhagen, and is recommended as an additional resource for teachers and students or for general public use. It accompanies the downloadable exhibition education kit and art trail.


TEACHERS SESSION
Teachers' information session with Sarah Johnson Curator, Newcastle Art Gallery
Thursday 20 June
5.30pm - 6.30pm

Join curator of the exhibition Sarah Johnson at this special preview event only for teachers. Enjoy refreshments and time with colleagues, gather suggestions for teaching and learning, and examine free resources and programs with Audience Programs staff.
Free. Registration required on 4974 5100


IN CONVERSATION
Philip Wolfhagen in conversation with Sarah Johnson Curator, Newcastle Art Gallery
Sunday 23 June
2.00pm - 3.00pm

Philip Wolfhagen will share his perspective on the works in the exhibition and his processes as an artist. Stay around after Philip's talk for music in the Gallery with Illuminating Sounds.
Free. Bookings required on 4974 5100


ILLUMINATING SOUNDS
Every Sunday throughout the exhibition
23 June (after In Conversation)
3.00pm - 4.00pm
30 June, 7, 14, 21 & 28 July, 4 & 11 August
2.00pm - 3.00pm
Free
No bookings required

Come and listen to classical guitar, violin, and cello amongst the exhibition.


TORCHLIGHT TOUR
For children & their families
Saturday 29 June
6.00pm - 7.30pm

Enjoy Illumination The art of Philip Wolfhagen in a whole new light. Join Gallery educators for free children¡¯s art activities and free guided tours by our Gallery guides, all by torchlight. A fun, enjoyable family night out.
Free. Bookings required
Call 4974 5100


SOCIETY EVENT
Coffee with Art
Wednesday 3 July
10.30am - 12.00pm

Craig Judd, independent curator, arts writer and lecturer, explores Illumination The art of Philip Wolfhagen.
$10 members, $15 non-members payable at the door
RSVP required. Call 4974 5123


SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS
For infants school aged children
10.30am - 12.30pm

Week 1: Tuesday 2, Thursday 4 & Friday 5 July
Week 2: Tuesday 9, Thursday 11 & Friday 12 July


For primary school aged children
2.30pm - 4.30pm

Week 1: Tuesday 2 & Thursday 4 July
Week 2: Tuesday 9 & Thursday 11 July
Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by the works in Illumination The art of Philip Wolfhagen. Children will fill canvases with art making materials used by Philip Wolfhagen, or, create a rain and thunderstorm performance in the Gallery. More information at time of booking.

$15 per child
Bookings required, all materials supplied
Payment must be made at time of booking
Call 4974 5100


QUICKDRAW
For high school aged young people
3.00pm - 4.30pm
Week 1: Wednesday 3 & Friday 5 July
Week 2: Wednesday 10 & Friday 12 July

Casual, drop-in drawing classes for teens, run by Gallery educators. This holidays, sessions are inspired by Philip Wolfhagen's cloud studies or his recent return to line making through drawing.
Free
No bookings required, basic materials supplied
Call 4974 5100


NAIDOC WORKSHOP
For infants & primary school aged children
Wednesday 10 July
2.30pm - 4.30pm

Join Gallery educators in this special school holiday workshop, where children will bead their own shell necklaces inspired by Aboriginal beading techniques used in Tasmania, Philip Wolfhagen's home state.
$15 per child
Bookings required, all materials supplied
Payment must be made at time of booking. Call 4974 5100


TODDLER PLAY DAYS
For toddlers & their families
9.30am - 11.00am
In the Sea: Monday 22 July
In the Clouds: Monday 5 August

Parents, carers and toddlers are invited to enjoy a relaxed family friendly atmosphere as the Gallery opens its doors on a Monday, especially for them. Discover the world of Philip Wolfhagen's seascapes and skyscapes, enjoy toddler friendly art making activities with dramatic and musical play.
$5 per child
Bookings required, all materials supplied
Call 4974 5100


TOURING TO
Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery TAS
13 September - 1 December 2013
The Australian National University Drill Hall Gallery ACT
20 February - 6 April 2014
Cairns Regional Gallery QLD
9 May - 6 July 2014
Tweed River Art Gallery NSW
8 August - 12 October 2014
Hamilton Art Gallery VIC
15 November 2014 - 1 February 2015
Gippsland Art Gallery VIC
14 February - 12 April 2015


TAKE IT HOME
Illumination The Art of Philip Wolfhagen catalogue - $39.95
Wolfhagen cards (4 selected works to chose from) - $3.50
Philip Wolfhagen Surface Tension no 3 1998 poster - $14.95





FIONA HALL showcasing works from the collection

18 May - 9 June 2013

This focus exhibition showcases the broad range of works in the Newcastle Art Gallery collection encompassing Hall’s creative output. Early photography from the 1970s, through to ceramic works, small sculpture and printmaking produced during recent residencies in Northern Australia; Hall is a unique artist in her ability to move effortlessly between media and expresses a poignant sensibility about the environment and our tenuous relationship with it.




Markers of Life

November 24 - December 12 2012

A focus exhibition of Australian Indigenous ceremonial poles and paintings from the collection that showcase the growing contemporary Indigenous works belonging to Newcastle Art Gallery.

In recent years, the collection has grown through the generosity of benefactors who have been collecting such pieces as Mimih Spirit poles, Lorkon hollow logs and Yawkyawk all of which are from Indigenous communities throughout the Northern Territory. The addition of these works into the collection further develops the existing Indigenous art collection. Works include new painting acquisitions by artists Prince of Wales and Sally Gabori.




COLLECTION COMPANIONS from the collection

November 24 2012 - June 9 2013

Art galleries are often known for their key ‘masterpieces’ - the iconic works of art that people become familiar with and associate with that gallery. The majority of the collection is often hidden from public view in storerooms, yet these works of art warrant display as regularly as iconic works.

This exhibition features works from prominent Australian artists including Fred Williams, Charles Blackman, Brett Whiteley, John Coburn, Margaret Preston, Kitty Kantilla, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, as well as contemporary artists Gloria Petyarre and Ildiko Kovacs.

This exhibition is a perfect opportunity to get acquainted with the lesser known works alongside the more renowned works of art from the collection.


INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY EVENT
Floor talk: five women artists
Friday 8 March
11.00am – 12.00pm

Free
Bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Sarah Johnson, Curator Newcastle Art Gallery, speaks on five key women artists from the collection, all on display in Collection companions.

 

IN CONVERSATION
Karen Aspden with Sarah Johnson, Curator Newcastle Art Gallery
Saturday 23 March
2.00pm – 3.00pm

Free
Bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Karen Aspden, wife of the late David Aspden discusses the progession of Aspden’s work, through two works of David’s recently donated to the collection, in comparison to three works on paper also on display that were acquired in 1979.

 

SOCIETY EVENT
Coffee with Art
Wednesday 3 April
10.30am – 12.00pm

$10 members, $15 non-members payable at the door
RSVP required
Call 4974 5123
Diarne Wiercinski, Assistant Curator, Newcastle Art Gallery explores Collection companions, focusing on the stories behind key acquisitions.

 

TORCHLIGHT TOUR
For children and families
Saturday 13 April
6.00pm – 7.30pm

Free
Bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Enjoy the exhibitions in a whole new light. Gallery educators presenting children’s art activities and Gallery guides providing tours, all by torchlight.

 

GALLERY OPEN LATE
All exhibitions
Saturday 4 May
5.30pm – 9.00pm

Free
To celebrate the close of Collection companions and The Treasures of Newcastle from the Macquarie era, visit the Gallery after hours to enjoy musical performances, guided tours and a range of other free programs for visitors of all ages.

 

SMART SPACE
For those who want to know more
smART space is a dedicated education space within the exhibition space on the first floor. It presents additional reading material, information and children’s activities intended to support the exhibition on display.
For Collection companions, smART space focuses on the works of Margaret Preston. For more information visit www.nag.org.au/learning.

 

TAKE IT HOME
Collection companions greeting cards are available for $3.50 at the Gallery Shop.




WITHIN SIGHT OF LAND from the collection

1 September - 25 November 2012

This exhibition, drawn from the Gallery's collection, explores the notion of the seascape as one of the most developed art genres for many centuries. The title of the exhibition Within sight of land suggests a connection between land and sea and a yearning for the possible discovery of new worlds.

The exhibition entices the viewer to travel beyond the safety of land, beckoning them to respond to the physical and spiritual forces of the sea. It highlights our continues enchantment with the ocean and, particularly here in Newcastle, reminds us that we are a population which clings to the coast.


Children

School Holiday workshops
For children 5-8
Tuesday 2, Wednesday 3, Thursday 4 October
10.30am – 12.30pm

School Holiday workshops
For children 9-13
Tuesday 2, Wednesday 3, Thursday 4 October
2.30pm – 4.30pm
Bookings required 4974 5114
$15 members / $20 non-members
Join Gallery educators for age appropriate art workshops, inspired by the works of art on display in Tales of the city and Within sight of land exhibitions.


Art Gallery Society
Coffee with art
Wednesday 7 November
10.30am – 12.00 noon
Refreshments included. RSVP essential 4974 5123
$10 members / $15 non-members
Lauretta Morton, Exhibitions Coordinator and curator of Within sight of land, Curator Sarah Johnson, and Assistant Curator Diarne Wiercinski, in casual conversation discuss the exhibitions Tales of the city and Within sight of land.


Adults

Exhibition talk – David Braidwood and Tom Braidwood
Thursday 15 November
6.00pm - 7.30pm
Free
Refreshments included. Bookings essential 4974 5114
The Gallery will welcome two generations of internationally renowned yachtsmen, David Braidwood and his nephew Tom Braidwood, to talk about their experience of the changing moods of the sea. Learn from their knowledge of both the pleasure and the competition of yaughting on their extensive experience in Sydney to Hobart yacht races, World Volvo Ocean Races, and Pacific Rim Regattas.


Regular Programs

Public guided tours
Saturdays and Sundays
11.00am – 12.00am
No bookings required
Free

OR book a guided tour for your group at a time that suits you. Call the Gallery on 4974 5100

Art Cart
For children of all ages and their parents or carers
Saturdays and Sundays
10.30am – 12.30pm
No bookings required
Children must be accompanied by an adult
Free







ARCHIBALD PRIZE 2012

An Art Gallery of NSW exhibition toured by Museums & Galleries NSW

12 July - 26 August 2012

This annual exhibition, eagerly anticipated by artists and audiences alike, never ceases to create lively debate amongst the arts community and wider public. The Archibald Prize is one of Australia’s oldest and most prestigious art prizes and is awarded to the best portrait painting, preferably of a man or woman distinguished in art, letters, science or politics. Featuring works by Ben Quilty, Vernon Ah Kee and the 2012 Archibald Prize winner, Tim Storrier.

Newcastle Art Gallery is also pleased to announce the People’s Choice Award, chosen by visitors to the exhibition during its time in Newcastle, has been awarded to Angus McDonald for the portrait of fellow artist Tim Maguire. Visitors who cast their vote went in the running to win an ANZ Visa Debit card valued at $500 courtesy of Archibald Prize Principal Sponsor ANZ. The winning voter, who was also drawn at random from a pool of over 2500 entries, was Roslyn Beard of Dudley.

An admission fee applies:
$8 general public, $5 members/concession.
Children under 12 and school students free.


Adults
Portrait Painting Master Class
Saturday 21 July
10.30am – 3.30pm
Painting workshop in Gallery conducted by a master portrait painter. Includes exhibition entry.
$55

Portrait Cocktail Hour
Saturday 11 August
6.00pm - 7.30pm
Put on a sharp suit or fabulous frock and sip cocktails with an Archibald artist and their subject. Featuring actor John Wood in conversation with artist Raelene Sharp, and artist Nigel Milsom with Rosemarie Milsom, award winning journalist, Newcastle Herald.
A partnership with Silo Restaurant & Lounge.
$15 Adults, $10 Gallery Society and Foundation members. Ticket includes one cocktail.
Bookings 4974 5114
*Art Gallery open until 9.00pm to coincide with the Darby Street Twilight Festival Bohemia.

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free with exhibition entry fee


Family
Torchlight Portraiture Tours
Saturday 28 July
7.30pm – 9.00pm
Discover the stars of the Archibald by torchlight.
For children and families
Free

After School Portrait Workshops
Tuesday 7-21 August
4.00pm – 5.30pm
For children aged 8 -12 years
$45. Includes three workshops and all materials.

Twilight Archibald
Saturday 25 August
5.30pm – 9.00pm

Join us to farewell the Archibald in its last weekend in Newcastle with a late night opening which will include live music and performances in conjunction with LIVE SITES.


Education
Archibald Teachers’ Evening
Friday 20 July
5.00pm – 7.00pm
Share a glass of wine with your colleagues in the ARCHIBALD and let Newcastle Art Gallery staff introduce you to the education programs and materials.
Free exhibition entry for teachers for this event.

Focus tour available**
Free entry for all school bookings

Resources
Archibald education resource from the Art Gallery of New South Wales (coming soon)

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with art
10.30am – 12.00 noon
Wednesday 1 August
Wayne Tunnicliffe, Head of Australian Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales discusses entries in the Archibald Prize.
$10 members, $15 non-members
payable at the door
RSVP essential 4974 5123 or gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Bookings required for marked events
*Art Gallery 02 4974 5114
**Audience Programs 02 4974 5112




ART & AUSTRALIA COLLECTION 2003 - 2013

8 December 2012 - 17 February 2013

Melting fridges, mysticism, microcosms and mandalas are all in Art & Australia Collection 2003 - 2013. The Art & Australia collection includes a variety of innovative contemporary works of art including video, painting, sculpture, light installation, sound art and photography. Throughout 2014, the Gallery will tour this exhibition to major regional galleries in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

The Art & Australia Contemporary Art Award was established by the respected art journal of the same name, to promote the work of artists from Australia and New Zealand. The award focuses on artists in the first five years of their practice, supporting them with a critical text discussing their practice and the illustration of the work on the magazines back cover. To date, the work of twenty-four artists has been acquired for the collection, which represents not only a diversity of art practice but also cultural perspectives within Australian art today.

Since winning the award and entering the collection, many of these artist’s careers have flourished – Del Kathryn Barton: 2008 Archibald Prize winner and Jonathan Jones: 2012 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, National Indigenous Triennial Canada to name a few.

In partnership with Art & Australia, Newcastle Art Gallery will tour this exhibition nationally in 2013-14.



SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS
For children 5-8 years
10.30am – 12.30pm

For children 9-13 years
2.30pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday 15, Wednesday 16 and Thursday 17 January
$15 per child|
Bookings required, payment must be made at time of booking
Call 4974 5100
Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by Art & Australia Collection 20032013. Inspired by the work of Amanda Marburg (pictured), children will create multi media representations of their own three dimensional plasticine models.


ARTISTS FORUM
Saturday 2 February
11.00am – 12.00pm
Free
Bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Join Diarne Wiercinski, Assistant Curator, Newcastle Art Gallery in conversation with artists from the Art & Australia collection, discussing their work on display and
the progression of their practice in recent years.
For more information go to www.nag.org.au/exhibitions


EXHIBITION RESOURCES
Art & Australia 2003 – 2013 catalogue
$29, available from the Gallery Shop

Art Trail for children
Free
Available at the front desk The Art Trail is designed for families and parents with young children. It highlights themes and connections between works of art on display, and encourages interaction and observation during your visit.


TOURING INFORMATION
Touring nationally in 2013 – 2014

New South Wales
Hazelhurst Regional Gallery & Arts Centre
15 December 2013 – 27 January 2014

Dubbo Regional Gallery
8 March – 4 May 2014

Victoria
Gippsland Art Gallery|
17 May – 13 July 2014

Art Gallery of Ballarat
16 August – 28 September 2014

Queensland
Ipswich Art Gallery
1 November – 21 December 2014




TALES OF THE CITY from the collection

1 September - 25 November 2012

Drawn from the Gallery's painting and works on paper collections, this exhibition examines artists' explorations of the city as a powerful physical and psychological space. Focussing on artists from the 1930s onward who wholeheartedly embraced modernism and modernity, the city was and continues to be a rich source of stimulation and inspiration.


Adults
Exhibition talk - Stories of the City
Greg and Sylvia Ray
Thursday 22 November
6.00pm - 7.30pm
Free
Refreshments included. Bookings required 4974 5114
Journalist Greg Ray and his wife Sylvia, who compiled Newcastle the Missing Years and Recovered Memories - Newcastle and the Hunter, share some of their thoughts about Newcastle, its past and present. The event will also feature a viewing of Story of a City, an unusual 1945 colour documentary on Newcastle.


Art Gallery Society
Coffee with art
Wednesday 3 October
10.30am – 12.00 noon
Refreshments included. RSVP essential 4974 5123
$10 members / $15 non-members
Lauretta Morton, Exhibitions Coordinator and curator of Within sight of land, Sarah Johnson, Curator, and Diarne Wiercinski, Assistant Curator, in casual conversation to discuss the exhibition Tales of the city and Within sight of land.


Children
School Holiday workshops
For children 5-8
Tuesday 2, Wednesday 3, Thursday 4 October
10.30am – 12.30pm

School Holiday workshops
For children 9-13
Tuesday 2, Wednesday 3, Thursday 4 October
2.30pm – 4.30pm
Bookings required 4974 5114
$15 members / $20 non-members
Join Gallery educators for age appropriate art workshops, inspired by the works of art on display in Tales of the city and Within sight of land exhibitions.


Regular Programs
Public guided tours
Saturdays and Sundays
11.00am – 12.00am
No bookings required
Free

OR book a guided tour for your group at a time that suits you. Call the Gallery on 4974 5100

Art Cart
For children of all ages and their parents or carers
Saturdays and Sundays
10.30am – 12.30pm
No bookings required
Children must be accompanied by an adult
Free




A JAPANESE AESTHETIC: Keith Clouton & Jim Deas ceramic collection - a gift to Newcastle

November 24 2012- February 17 2013

This focus exhibition presents recent and proposed gifts from collectors Keith Clouton and Jim Deas whose philanthropic connections to Newcastle Art Gallery have been longstanding. Their enthusiasm and advocacy for Japanese ceramics, as well as the quality of the Clouton and Deas collection, inspired previous Gallery Director, David Thomas to create Newcastle’s Nagano collection in 1972, initiating the Gallery’s ongoing collecting of Japanese ceramics.

This exhibition is timely as a continuum of both the generosity of benefactors to the collection and the exhibiting of Japanese ceramics at this Gallery.


JAPANESE FOOD AND SAKÉ TASTING NIGHT
Monday 21 January
6.00pm – 7.30pm
$10 per person
Limited spaces available
Bookings required, payment must be made at time of booking
Call 4974 5100
Celebrated Subo owner/chef Beau Vincent, and Gallery Director Ron Ramsey in conversation discuss the intricacies and wonders of Japanese cuisine and ceramics. Japanese cuisine and sake tastings, prepared by Subo, will accentuate the event. This event is part of an ongoing series of talks, intended to inspire new conversations about remarkable works in the Newcastle Art Gallery collection.


SOCIETY EVENT
Coffee with Art
Wednesday 6 February
10.30am – 12.00pm
$10 members
$15 non-members
payable at the door
RSVP required
Call 4974 5123
Daniel McOwan, Director, Hamilton Art Gallery Victoria, discusses the exhibition.


EXHIBITION RESOURCE
A Japanese aesthetic: Keith Clouton & Jim Deas ceramic collection – a gift to Newcastle exhibition brochure.
Free
Available in the gallery space and at the front desk.


TOURING INFORMATION
Touring in 2014
Victoria
Hamilton Art Gallery
6 February – 30 March 2014




DEL KATHRYN BARTON The Nightingale and the Rose and New Work

December 15 2012 to February 17 2013

An exhibition of paintings by Del Kathryn Barton inspired by Oscar Wilde’s classic story The Nightingale and the Rose, originally created for an illustrated book commissioned by Art & Australia. The theme of ecstatic metamorphosis through song attracted Barton to this story, where the life of a small bird is offered up for the ideal of love. For Barton, "the Nightingale is the true artist as she gives completely of her deepest essence".

New work
Barton presents two new major paintings and works on paper created specifically for display in Newcastle.

Art-_and_-Aus-logo-blk-web



QUICK DRAW

For high school age young people
Friday 18, Saturday 19 January
3.00pm – 4.30pm
Free
All materials supplied
No bookings required
Join Gallery educators for free drawing classes inspired by Del Kathryn Barton. Experiment with colour and line, using a range of materials.


SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS
For children 5-8 years
10.30am – 12.30pm

For children 9-13 Years
2.30pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday 22, Wednesday 23 and Thursday 24 January
$15 per child
All materials supplied
Bookings required, payment must be made at time of booking.
Call 4974 5100
Join Gallery educators for age appropriate art workshops inspired by the works of art on display in The Nightingale and the Rose. Create wondrous hybrid creatures using watercolour and collage, exploring storytelling through art making.


IN CONVERSATION
Del Kathryn Barton and Eleonora Triguboff Art & Australia Publisher/Editor with Tristan Sharp Newcastle Art Gallery Assistant Director.
Saturday 9 February
2.00pm – 3.00pm
Free
Bookings required
Call 4974 5100
Del Kathryn Barton in conversation with Eleonora Triguboff and Tristan Sharp, discusses The Nightingale and the Rose book project, and the new works on exhibition in Newcastle for the first time.


TAKE IT HOME
Commissioned by Art & Australia, Del Kathryn Barton’s book The Nightingale and the Rose is available in a large format book version, $79.95.

Signed, limited editioned copies with sleeve, $220.00.

Signed, limited edition digital reproduction prints, image size: 55 x 55 cm, unframed, $700.|

Gift card pack of twelve, $35.00.
Avaliable from the Gallery Shop.

 




Convict artist, Joseph Lycett was an intriguing figure in early Newcastle. His artistic legacy in the collection is revealed in oil paintings, aquatints, engravings and the recently acquired illustrated book, Views in Australia, or New South Wales and Van Dieman’s Land Delineated 1824-5.

Published from July 1824 by J. Souter in London, the book contains forty eight hand coloured aquatint views and descriptions of the emerging colony. Sydney Harbour, the colonial settlements of Parramatta, Windsor and Tasmania and two detailed maps of New South Wales and Van Dieman’s Land are featured.

The publication sought to encourage voluntary migration to Australia and to promote agricultural interest in the mainland and Tasmania. The detailed documentation of crops, livestock, flora and fauna suggests that:
“… the publication was aimed at the educated emigrant and wealthy investor, with numerous illustrations and references to the colonial success of individuals such
as pastorialist and entrepreneur John Macarthur and businessman Alexander Riley.”1

The book was printed in England as a series of thirteen parts published in monthly intervals from 1 July 1824 to 1 June 1825. It was also proposed to have the twelfth chapter contain a brief history and natural history of Australia however these were never published due to waning interest in this style of publication.

The three plates relating to the early Newcastle region are of the construction of the breakwater to Nobby’s Point; Lake Patterson, near Patterson’s Plains, Hunter’s River and Sugar Loaf Mountain (Mt Sugarloaf), where ‘…many settlers have recently taken up their grants of land in this delightful part of the island, and from its many excellencies, as well as the vicinity to Newcastle, from whence there is constant communication with Sydney, it will doubtless, in a few years, become one of the most
valuable stations in the colony.’2

Vistas of Hobart, the Derwent River and remote areas of the Tasman Peninsula, are also included however there is little recorded evidence to suggest that Lycett ever went to Tasmania to document these views.3

In 1824 Lycett, now a free man returned to England to publish this work. Critical reception was initially warm, however sales rapidly dwindled and instead of being sold at their original £7/17 shillings cost, they were consigned to £2/16 shillings.4

Lycett was demoralised following the commercial failure of the book, so returned to forgery as a source of income. When authorities swooped to arrest him, he attempted to slash his own throat, later dying from his injuries on 9 February 1828, aged fifty three.

It is believed that approximately fifteen hundred to two thousand copies of the book were published, but the number of complete editions still in circulation today is unknown. It is for this reason also that this acquisition of Views in Australia, or New South Wales and Van Dieman’s Land Delineated 1824-1825 is such a vital addition to the collection as both a rare art object and historical documentation of the growing colony, particularly Newcastle.

Sarah Johnson
Curator


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 44, Number 1
February 2013 - July 2013



1 John McPhee (ed) Joseph Lycett Convict Artist, Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales, 2006, Sydney, p25

2 Joseph Lycett Views in Australia, or New South Wales and Van Dieman’s Land Delineated 1824-1825 published by J. Souter, 1824-1825 London

3 John Turner Joseph Lycett - Governor Macquarie’s convict artist, Hunter History Publications, Newcastle 1997, page 103

4 Travel in aquatint and lithography 1770 -1860 from the library of J.R. Abbey, volume II, A biographical catalogue, London, privately printed at the Curwen Press 1957, pages 515-518




Ōtagaki Rengetsu

19th century sake flask

Ōtagaki Rengetsu lived in the late Edo period (1603 – 1867) and early Meiji (1868-1912). She had no aristocratic background yet remains a celebrated historical figure in Japan through her prolific contribution to painting, poetry and pottery.

By the time Rengetsu was twenty-one she had lost three children and had divorced her husband. After her second husband died, Rengetsu vowed never to marry again. As legend has it, she was incredibly beautiful and went to great lengths to circumvent the attention of men. It is around this time, in her early thirties that she took the name Rengetsu, Lotus Moon and became a Buddhist nun. With the passing of her adoptive father as well as her remaining children, Rengetsu immersed herself in creativity as a means to combat her grief.[1]

The 19th century sake flask recently acquired by the Gallery stands at only eleven centimetres and the delicate nature of the work reflects the sensitivity with which it was made. Rengetsu’s poetry (Waka) wraps around the glazed piece with two maple leaves painted towards the base. The leaves hint to the subject of the poem and translated the uniquely cursive Japanese characters read:

In water flowing

from a bamboo pipe

in a mountain village...

red leaves bring to mind

yesterday's autumn.

It is early winter. The grasses are dead and dry, perhaps frost on the ground. In her small hut in a mountain, Rengetsu spots some red maple leaves carried in the running water, which makes her think of the glorious autumn colours that passed.[2]

Sound is important in Japanese literature in order to evoke an emotional response. Rengetsu found peace from her troubled past by contemplating nature and inscribing her experiences onto her artwork. This work will join two sake cups and a lidded bowl by Rengetsu, also in the collection.

Diarne Wiercinski
Assistant Curator Collection & Exhibitions


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 44, Number 1
February 2013 - July 2013



[1] Black robe white mist: art of the Japanese Buddhist nun Rengetsu National Gallery of Australia, 2007

[2] Translation and interpretation by Chiaki Ajioka







Jacqui Stockdale

Rama-Jaara the royal shepherdess 2012

Lagunta Man, Leeawuleena 2012

Jacquie Stockdale is a Melbourne based artist whose work oscillates between painting, drawing, collage and photography. The recently acquired type-C photographs Rama-Jaara the royal shepherdess 2012 and Lagunta Man, Leeawuleena 2012 explore Stockdale’s ongoing interest in notions of personal and cultural identity - its construction, plasticity and manipulation.

The works are staged in a highly theatrical tableaux in which the use of costume, make up and props - in particular masks picked up in markets and bazaars around the world - are key. Stockdale’s interest lies in how these objects accumulate meanings, how they are invested with both personal and collective memory and then re-activated by the actions and performances built around them. These are powerful impulses across cultures: voodoo and superstition or ritual and religion, and processes for making sense of the world and our place in it.

Both works have an aura of the colonial postcard and the ethnographic record, derived from fact but inevitably laced with fiction. They incorporate the hand crafted with painted back drops and costumes, dominated by fantastical self-possessing characters, all rendered in photographic high definition. They broadcast to the viewer a hyper-real, uncanny quality, the characters drawn out of their historical backdrop to confront and challenge the here and now.

Rama-Jaara the royal shepherdess 2012 depicts the artist’s family property Long Gully, Bendigo after the Black Saturday bush fires three years ago. This setting anchors the work in the specific and the personal for the artist, yet through the title also simultaneously binds them to a wider cultural tradition. ‘Rama’ a term which references Indian deities is also a play on words relating to the ram’s head type hairstyle - a nod to a pastoralist past. ‘Jaara’is the Aboriginal word for the Long Gully region. The young shepherdess stands proud and strong, a reference to Velázquez’s Infanta in Las Meninas and its self-conscious, self-referential composition.

Similarly in Lagunta Man, Leeawuleena 2012 the backdrop is Cradle Mountain Tasmania, or Leeawuleena home of Lagunta, the Tasmanian tiger the now mythic creature long extinct, collateral of the colonial influence. Again the work is tethered to the personal for the artist through her older brother playing the character.

The addition of Stockdale’s work in the collection builds on holdings of contemporary photography by both Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists exploring similar issues. Collectively they enable a counterpoint to the Gallery’s colonial works whose depiction of landscape, while of its time continues to influence our sense of identity both individually and collectively.

Tristan Sharp
Assistant Director


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 44, Number 1
February 2013 - July 2013




Prince of Wales 1938 – 2002

Body marks 2002

Larrakia painter, singer and dancer, Prince of Wales (Midpul) grew up with his mother’s people, the Wadgigiyn on the Cox Peninsular just across the harbour from Darwin. The artist performed a dance for Queen Elizabeth II during her visit to Australia in the 1960s and it is thought that this, as well as his father being known as King George, was how he became known as Prince of Wales.

Prince of Wales was the first contemporary Aboriginal artist from the Larrakia region to gain recognition for his paintings. He took up his craft in 1995 and generally focused on the traditional body designs used in Danggalaba ceremonies. Early in his life his father died, leaving Prince of Wales to eventually inherit his traditional responsibilities to the Larrakia people. It is through his father's legacy that Prince of Wales became a prominent singer, dancer and ceremonial leader in his community.

In the work Body marks 2002, we see the typical use of bold colours, broad dots and linear structures that contribute to his contemporary aesthetic. The symbolism, always present in his work, has been passed on from his ancestors as marks on the bodies of ceremonial participants and is clearly evident.

It was not until after his death that Prince of Wales was recognised artistically. Many of his works were produced painted on scraps of cardboard and other found materials. It was only in the latter part of his career that his materials moved to canvas.

Courtney Novak
Front of House Officer


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 44, Number 1
February 2013 - July 2013




Artist’s studio & practice

Longford is a Georgian era town, a short drive from the centre of Launceston in northern Tasmania- the architecture of the village centre resonating a time gone by. Tucked next to the bakery is an unassuming colonial era building, a former flour mill, painted white and convict built as most structures are in this part of Tasmania. The downstairs is a scattered, maze like appliance repair workshop. Winding your way through the cavernous downstairs, heading up a precarious set of steep wooden stairs, you enter into a discrete light filled space- you enter Philip Wolfhagen’s studio.

Newcastle Art Gallery Curator Sarah Johnson

Considered a ‘painter’s painter’ Philip Wolfhagen is a dedicated and in many ways traditional studio painter. Committed five hours a day, six days a week, his studio is the basis for Wolfhagen’s almost ritualistic art making process. The large studio space is pungent with smells of paint, linseed oil and beeswax – materials Wolfhagen has become renowned for.

In October 2012 Newcastle Art Gallery’s Assistant Director Tristan Sharp and Curator Sarah Johnson traveled to Tasmania to meet with Wolfhagen. After flying from Sydney to Launceston and driving a further 15 minutes to Longford, their hopes to discuss exhibition logistics and catalogue details were surpassed when they were invited into Wolfhagen’s studio and then his home.

These images were taken during this trip and are a unique glimpse of the artist’s usually private world.

This slideshow contains photographs of Philip Wolfhagen's studio in Longford, Tasmania 2012.

 

Philip Wolfhagen studio from Newcastle-Art-Gallery


This slideshow contains photographs of Philip Wolfhagen's journals. Images include drawings, small studies for larger works and writings describing his process, emotions, ideas, and triggers or cues for later reference in his art making process.

Philip Wolfhagen journals from Newcastle-Art-Gallery


Read below as Newcastle Art Gallery staff (NAG) ask Philip Wolfhagen (PW) questions about the process of his art making practice.

Q & A with Philip Wolfhagen: process & materials

NAG: What is the most important stage of your art making process?
PW:
The most important part of the process is the 'end' stage – the act of painting. Up to this point there is a lot of tedious work; making stretcher bars, stretching linen, priming and sanding and generally anticipating the time when I can concentrate on painting. When I start to paint everything has to be prepared carefully; I have usually spent days mixing colour and rehearsing the painting. When the moment finally arrives, however, there are many paths to failure – one’s concentration can be easily broken by a difficult phone call, a power failure, the sudden loss of light if heavy cloud moves in, or most likely a pall of doubt rolls in, then all may be lost. I have learned not to despair in these circumstances; tomorrow things may improve!

NAG: What benefits do you get from keeping journals?
PW:
I use my journal to record the processes at work in the studio. Often I make very detailed colour notes that prove invaluable if I need to return to a painting after an extended period of time. The journal is a map of my progress. If I feel lost I can refer to the journal to help me find my way out of the maze of ideas I carry around in my head.
The journals are also a pragmatic reference manual. I make exact records of the paintings as they are finished, so the journals are a definitive record of titles, dimensions, medium and any information that is relevant to the evolution of a painting. I am trying to make it easier for future research, whether it is my own or that of a curator or historian.




Exhibition Video

This 8 minute short film was created for national tour with the exhibition Illumination The art of Philip Wolfhagen A Newcastle Art Gallery and Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery travelling exhibition.

Produced by Greg Appel.




Influences - Tasmania

In October 2012 Newcastle Art Gallery’s Assistant Director Tristan Sharp and Curator Sarah Johnson travelled to Tasmania to meet with Wolfhagen. After a long day in Wolfhagen’s studio and home, Johnson travelled through the nearby midlands landscape by car. Describing what happened next as a light bulb moment, Johnson recalls the realization that she was seeing Wolfhagen’s paintings in the landscape before her. The land, the trees and the light were all reminiscent of Wolfhagen’s work. These images were taken through the car window in those moments.

Wolfhagen's Tasmania 

 

Wolfhagen's Tasmania 


Influences - Tasmania links

Click on the following links to view articles that explore themes found in Philip Wolfhagen's work. For more information about these themes go to the Illumination The art of Philip Wolfhagen Education kit.

The webpage Australian Government Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency is a reliable source for factual information about the effects of climate change on Australia. Philip Wolfhagen often paints clouds that are ominous, presenting as the dark looming moment before a thunderstorm. Wolfhagen acknowledges that environmental awareness is a global concern and as a result his cloud paintings can be seen as warnings against past and future environmental disasters.

The National Geographic article Species Revival: Should We Bring Back Extinct Animals? features a controversial debate about whether it is appropriate to bring animal species back to life after long periods of extinction. It is thought that Wolfhagen's often empty landscapes express an absence of what was once in Tasmania - the original home of the now extinct Tasmanian Tiger.
 
The article Vandalism of the Lea Tree describes a divisive episode in Australian history when a proposal was forwarded to construct a dam on the Gordon River below Franklin in Tasmania. A suite of photographs by Peter Dombrovskis - an artist whose work has influenced Philip Wolfhagen - was one of the contributing factors that led to the end of the damming at that time.
 

Q & A with Philip Wolfhagen: Influences - Tasmania

NAG: How is your local environment different now to when you were young?
PW: The most noticeable difference is the agricultural land use. The main driver of this change has been the development of irrigation into what was once a dry landscape that was traditionally used for grazing – mainly sheep for wool. In the 17 years since I returned to live in this area an industrial revolution has taken place. A rural landscape of square-hedged paddocks has given way to the big circles of centre pivot irrigators!

When I was young we used to be able to ski every winter in Tasmania - that has changed because of the warming climate.

NAG: What experiences in your life led you to having a heightened awareness of the environment?
PW: I grew up in a relatively isolated valley in a family obsessed with the natural world, and although this included a passion for hunting, it did not seem at odds with our love for every living thing in our environment. As a child it was the arrival of the migratory birds in spring that made me feel connected to place, but it also made me wonder about other places – where had these birds been since I last heard them in the autumn? I still get a thrill when I hear the first Striated Pardalote call around the third week in August, and then I know that the cuckoos will arrive, and that the cycle goes on as it has for untold seasons before.

 




Influences - music and literature

For Philip Wolfhagen the role of music is extraordinarily important in the production of his work. Amongst others the sounds of George Frideric Handel - a British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, anthems, and organ concertos, Ludwig van Beethoven - a German composer and pianist who remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers, and Edward Benjamin Britten - an English composer, conductor, and pianist, all echo throughout the studio.

Wolfhagen explains that classical music in the studio re-focuses his consciousness on painting. He is drawn to music which mimics the fluid troughs and peaks of nature, as well as dark and melancholic compositions. Nature and melancholy are two prevalent themes in Wolfhagen’s body of work.

Wolfhagen is equally inspired by literature, with books ranging from John Gage's seminal book on colour to a publication on Claude Lorrain piled up in his studio. Wolfhagen acknowledges that his interpretation of art history evolves with every book he reads and that this knowledge naturally feeds into his art making process.

 
View the clips below to see performances of classical musicians playing compositions similar to those that inspire Philip Wolfhagen. 









Throughout his years, film, poetry and books have played important roles for Philip Wolfhagen. He acknowledges the list below as having made lasting impressions on him during the different stages of his life.

Books
Metamorphoses by Ovid
An Imaginary Life
by David Malouf
Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse
Colour and Culture by John Gage
Landscape and Memory by Simon Schama
Dirt Music by Tim Winton
The Gormenghast Trilogy by Mervyn Peake
50 Great Curries of India by Camellia Panjabi
Fishes of Tasmania by Last, Scott and Talbot


Films
The Deerhunter by Michael Cimino 1978
The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser by Werner Herzog 1974
Jean de Florette and Manon des Sources, 1986 Claude Berri
Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner, 2001



Read below as Newcastle Art Gallery staff (NAG) ask Philip Wolfhagen (PW) about the influence of music on his art making practice.

Q & A with Philip Wolfhagen: Inspiring music 

NAG: What is your favourite moment in your art making process?
PW:
My favourite moment is the one outlined above; the make or break moment! This part of my process usually involves an intense engagement with a piece of music, and often I am not really conscious of the act of painting. I think my best work comes out of this engagement with listening, so that actually I am not thinking about painting - I think only about sound and colour, about the texture of the music and of the tonality of light and shade, about the materials in my hands, and the rhythms inherent in both mediums.





Influences - artists

Philip Wolfhagen acknowledges references to almost all periods of art history from the 17th century to the present, suggesting his paintings can be seen as a “synthesis of time”.

Wolfhagen’s classical themes and strict linear design can be seen as referencing the enlightenment movement (1600 - 1700’s), his conjuring of mood and concomitant emotion references early romanticism (late1700’s), the flattening of his landscape references modernism (1900 - 1950), and his split horizon lines have been described as post-modern (post 1950).

Discover the work of artists who have inspired Wolfhagen stylistically, historically, and conceptually.


John Constable Clouds 1822
John Constable Clouds 1822
oil on paper on cardboard
National Gallery of Victoria
, Melbourne
Felton Bequest 1938



W B Gould
Flowers and fruit c1840
oil on canvas
Purchased 1961
Newcastle Art Gallery collection


Dombrovskis, Peter. Native pigface, Tarkine Wilderness, Tasmania, 1995
Dombrovskis, Peter, 1945-1996.
Native pigface, Tarkine Wilderness, Tasmania, 1995 [picture]
1995. 1 photograph : col. ; 64.2 x 51.4 cm.
Part of Dombrovskis collection of Tasmanian wilderness photographs, 1978-1995


Dombrovskis, Peter. Morning mist, Rock Island Bend, Franklin River, Tasmania, 1979
Dombrovskis, Peter, 1945-1996.
Morning mist, Rock Island Bend, Franklin River, Tasmania, 1979 [picture]
1979. 1 photograph : col. ; 51.4 x 64.2 cm.
Part of Dombrovskis collection of Tasmanian wilderness photographs, 1978-1995


Dombrovskis, Peter. Morning light on Little Horn, Cradle Mountain-Lake St. Clair National Park, Tasmania, 1995
Dombrovskis, Peter, 1945-1996.
Morning light on Little Horn, Cradle Mountain-Lake St. Clair National Park, Tasmania, 1995 [picture]
1995. 1 photograph : col. ; 64.2 x 51.4 cm.
Part of Dombrovskis collection of Tasmanian wilderness photographs, 1978-1995


Q & A with Philip Wolfhagen: Artistic Influences

NAG: How important is understanding the work of Artist’s who have come before you to your own art making practice?
PW: I think it is critically important to interpret the art of the past in the process of making art in the present. This is why the language of Painting is so full of ripe possibility; each generation builds upon the achievements of the previous one, and the lexicon only broadens. My interpretation of art history evolves with every book I read and every exhibition I see - it is a constantly expanding realm of understanding, and it is natural that this knowledge feeds into processes in the studio. 

NAG: It has been said that your paintings could be seen as a synthesis of time. What does this mean?
PW: This is a more difficult question to answer. You could say that my work is a synthesis - or a condensation – of time in a literal sense because the paintings make reference to the past through quotation of art history, yet they are firmly anchored in the present by their physical presence.

My repeated use of multi panel formats and the split image are metaphors for the passage of time.





Naata Nungurrayi

Untitled 2010

Naata Nungurrayi circa 1932 is regarded as one of the leading Australian Indigenous artists of the Western Desert. Born into the Pintupi people from Northern Territory/Western Australia she is now one of the senior elders of the Kintore women artist movement in the Northern Territory.  

Until April 1964 Naata lived a traditional lifestyle, experiencing vast tracks of her country by foot, first as a child and then as a young mother. After the death of her daughter and her husband during what she described as ‘dry and hot times’ Naata and her family slept on the ground in windbreaks and drank from water holes before moving to the Papunya settlement, Northern Territory. From there Naata spent time at Docker River, later moving back to her country in the early 1980’s when Walungurru (Kintore) was established as an outstation.

Naata began painting in 1994 and throughout her career has developed a distinctive colour palette. White, reds, blacks, yellows, oranges and pinks, with fine dots form bold lines to create the topographical view lines of a country personally travelled.

Naata’s work Untitled 2010 fits a similar description. It is a dense painting rich with layers revealing designs associated with the soakage water site of Unkunya, in Western Australia, an area where women dug for water during ancestral times. This painting offers a privileged glimpse of Naata’s private experiences, memories, stories heard, traditions seen, and so exhibiting her perpetual connection to country.

Jade Hull
Audience Programs Officer


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 44, Number 1
February 2013 - July 2013




Shaun Gladwell

Godspeed verticals: escalator sequence 2004

Shaun Gladwell was missing. Not the artist himself, but his work Godspeed verticals: escalator sequence 2004. For months the members of our art collecting group had searched their homes for the missing video work. While we had a roster of where all the works were supposed to be, the Gladwell didn’t seem to be where it should be. If it had been a painting, a photograph or a sculpture, like most of the other works in the collection, it would have been easy to spot: but this one had come in a box that looked like it should contain a power tool. Sure enough, it was found safely stored with the other power tools in someone’s laundry.

The temporary disappearance of this significant work of contemporary art is perhaps emblematic of the place of video art a decade ago, when Gladwell made the work and our art group bought it. People didn’t quite know how to look at it; where it sat in relation to other contemporary work; how to show it in their homes; how work was editioned; where its value as art lay. Even galleries were finding their way a decade ago: one dealer told us the price of a video work included the projector (it didn’t).

In 2014, video art – and that label seems to stick, irrespective of the digital form the work comes in – has its proper place in galleries and in homes, where it takes so little space to store but creates such an impact when it is shown. As technologies have improved and flat screens have become cheaper, owning and displaying the works has become easier. Some serious collectors build parts of their homes around displaying video works. The three works donated to the Art Gallery collection by Janne Ryan, Mark Wakely and me – the Gladwell, Julie Rrap’s Porous bodies 1999 and TV Moore’s Dead zone 2003 – together include 14 separate screens, enough to fill a small gallery.

Our journey through this world started small and tentatively, as any collecting does. But we applied the same values to video as to any other works: it needs to move us, to make us stop and think, to challenge us, to transport us. Sometimes it might be beautiful, sometimes not. The current exhibition NEW TO VIDEO shows that it’s an art form we should take seriously.

Steven Alward
Art collector and benefactor


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 45, Number 1 (February 2014 - June 2014), to coincide with the exhibition NEW TO VIDEO, 8 March - 27 April 2014

For an earlier interpretation of Godspeed verticals: escalator sequence 2004, read the attached essay by Diarne Wiercinski







Rosalie Gascoigne showcasing works from the collection

18 May – 9 June 2013

A focus on the expanding collection of works by celebrated Australian artist Rosalie Gascoigne. Featuring six works ranging from the 1970s to the late 1990s, including a recent acquisition of a seminal work from 1976 entitled Flora Galop.







Conversations with the Collection

Dallas Bray and Caryn Streeter

 

DALLAS BRAY
Newcastle Region Art Gallery collection

Born in Moree and now based in Newcastle, Dallas Bray often sets his unusual narratives in the familiar landscape of the Hunter region with its unique combination of the rural, urban and industrial. Consistent across all of Bray’s work is his quizzical eye and wry commentary and Burning Bush 2008 is no exception. Both title and subject allude to both the biblical story and to the end of George W Bush’s American presidency. The backdrop for the painting is the city of Newcastle, viewed from Stockton, and the figure who wears a hat made from a feral cat is a reference to the artist himself.

Bray’s works are allegories of human folly - but far from cruel or condescending, Bray sees himself as part of the absurdity that is humanity.


 

Caryn Street Is ignorance bliss? 2009

CARYN STREETER
Is ignorance bliss?
Painting
Kambala

If a tree falls in a forest but nobody is there to hear it, does it make a sound? Should you feel scared or vulnerable for the woman who is unaware of her grave future? Each painting in my series contributes to the overall mysterious story. I have drawn inspiration from the American rural landscapes of Andrew Wyeth with their associated feelings of isolation and vulnerability, and Edward Hopper’s realistic depictions of everyday life which evoke feelings of uneasiness and create a sense of mystery.

 




Noel McKenna

Sea creature 2012 and Favourite deceased artists 2012

The Gallery recently purchased two ceramic vessels by Noel McKenna Sea creature 2012 and Favourite deceased artists 2012 from his recent exhibition, The piano of my brother. The acquisitions will complement two ceramic works the Gallery already holds by the artist titled: Owl cup and saucer 1997 and Skipping cup and saucer 2001 donated to the Gallery in 2011 as well as a number of McKenna’s paintings.

McKenna, a Sydney based artist is well known for his allegorical paintings depicting seemingly ordinary scenes that often create a surreal atmosphere with their peculiar minimal style. Given the Gallery has such an important ceramic collection it is active in collecting visual artists who are not usually known for their ceramics and who use the medium in quite an original and refreshing way.

Standing at almost thirty centimetres each, the two vases are typically McKenna: awkward, naïve, poetic and steeped in his often humorous observations of ordinary life. Sea creature 2012 depicts an off-centre creature vulnerably staring out at the viewer as it tentacles merge with free flowing glaze drips that wrap around the work.

McKenna is a collector of imagery and as he travels, walks through his neighbourhood or surfs the internet, he gathers inspiration for his work. Favourite deceased artists 2012 lists four artists: Paul Klee, James Castle, Philip Guston and Joseph Cornell which gives the viewer an immediate insight into McKenna’s influences.

Diarne Wiercinski
Assistant Curator Collection & Exhibitions


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 44, Number 1
February 2013 - July 2013




Fiona Hall

Burning bright 2010

‘We learned that their homeland is a story place; it is the larder and the medicine chest, the almanac and vast encyclopaedia.’
Fiona Hall [1]

Fiona Hall’s Burning bright suite 2010 is the product of a cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary creative exchange between Yolngu artists from east Arnhem Land and four visiting artists from elsewhere in Australia.

The project, Djalkiri, We are standing on their names, took place at Yilpara, a coastal area in Blue Mud Bay, Northern Territory. Djalkiri is translated as ‘footprint’ or in Yolngu law ‘spiritual foundation of the world’.Hall’s suite of intaglio etchings on paper focus on native flora found in the area. The name of each work is the English word, followed by the Yolngu word.

One in a series of recent purchases, in 2011 the Gallery also purchased the 2006 Insectivorous suite of works by Hall and a 1974 photograph was purchased this year. As a significant Australian contemporary artist, the Gallery is focusing on Hall’s work, which allows us to investigate the artist’s progression, as well as the interplay with the world, artistic trends and the interrelationship with her contemporaries in the art world.  

In Brachychiton – Nanungguwa 2010, Hall’s inclination for precision is evident. Her composition focuses on the branches of the Brachychiton (commonly called Kurrajong tree). The print was made using two plates, and on close inspection you can see the join line down the centre. Birds, green ants and seed pods in varying stages of development are scattered across the page.

Hall is represented in the collection in photography, sculpture, printmaking and ceramics. Regardless of the medium she chooses to employ, her philosophies and perfectionism remain constant. The natural world, connection with the environment and human intervention are recurring themes in her works.

Lauren van Katwyk
Audience Development and Visitor Services Coordinator.


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 44, Number 1
February 2013 - July 2013



[1] Artist’s statement in Djalkiri, we are standing on their names publication (2010). Published by Nomad Art Productions.





Janet Beckhouse

Blue oyster teapot 2012

Following the acquisition of Siren 2011[1] by Janet Beckhouse, Blue oyster teapot 2012 is a fitting addition to the collection of this artist’s work. The Baroque-style teapot is composed of a mass of red coral and dark blue oyster shells, which almost claim victory over the classic form beneath.

The two pieces acquired for the collection have many common features: the playful interpretation of creatures of the sea; ‘horror vacui’ - the obsessive filling of empty space and the influence of a long European tradition of porcelain table ware. With its potent theme of coral and oyster, an aphrodisiac that increases our desire, Blue oyster teapot 2012 alters the clear mythological reference of Siren 2011.  This teapot can be viewed as a three dimensional still life.

Janet Beckhouse emphasises how important the vessel form and the legacy of ceramics are in her art work.[2]  Viewing the pieces, two historical traditions come to mind:  the faïence works of the 16th century by French potter Bernard Palissy c.1510-1590 and European porcelain tableware of the Baroque and Rococo periods.  

Soon after the 18th century discovery of hard paste porcelain in Meissen, Germany, the manufacturer started producing elaborately decorated vessels and figures, which replaced the former table decorations of sugar. The incredible detail and craftsmanship of these porcelain pieces made them a talking point and a feature of an aristocrat’s table.  

The same qualities apply to Janet Beckhouse’s vessels, with the difference that we can now all enjoy them.

Tobias Spitzer
Technical Officer


Originally written for Artemis, the Newcastle Art Gallery magazine, vol 44, Number 1
February 2013 - July 2013



[1] Siren 2011, porcelaneous stoneware and lustre glaze, 28.5 x 26.0 x 18.0 cm, Purchased with the assistance of Newcastle Art Gallery Society 2011, Newcastle Art Gallery collection
Featured in ARTEMIS Vol. 43 No.2 page 7

[2] Janet Beckhouse Private Gladiator 2011 Neon Parc, Melbourne, Interview by Matthew Hanson, produced by Rococo Productions 2012




MICHAEL SHANNON Australian Romantic Realist

30 June - 12 August 2012

An Art Gallery of Ballarat travelling exhibition

Curated by the Art Gallery of Ballart this exhibition is of paintings by artist Michael Shannon, including his compelling cityscapes. Drawn from private collections and Newcastle Art Gallery’s extensive holdings, this exhibition surveys the process and evolution of Shannon’s signature aesthetic. An artist largely overlooked by the mainstream since his death in 1993, this exhibition focuses on the works of a vital artist documenting the changing face of Australian suburbia.

Adult
Exhibition Talk
Saturday 30 June
11.00am

Join Director of the Art Gallery of Ballart Gordon Morrison as he discusses Michael Shannon’s works.
Free

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Family
Quick draw
Tuesday - Fridays
9-13 July
3.00pm – 4.30pm
Drawing workshops for those over 14.
Free

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
**Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




CLEMENT MEADMORE

18 May – 9 June 2013

The unveiling of a new acquisition Hereabout 1971/2001 by celebrated Australian/American sculptor Clement Meadmore. Hereabout is a major sculpture that investigates space, tension, geometry and grace, with the curvature of aluminum as a malleable form.




Spacial Dimension

Designed to enliven Wheeler Place in the Civic Precinct without physically intruding upon it, Spatial Dimension by David Jensz depicts a swirling vortex of movement, implying an expansion and contraction of space. The work uses a purpose built art frame as a two dimensional picture plane with hundreds of pieces of timber creating a mosaic image of distorted and folded space. The repeated shapes also with reference the nearby palm trees.










Kullas Incubator

Wallsend Brickworks was founded in the 1890’s by a “small syndicate of local gentleman of an enterprising turn of mind.” (Newcastle Morning Herald 1 June 1891) The Wallsend Brickworks included a quarry and brickmaking facilities where coal was extracted onsite to fire the brick furnaces that operated from 1891 to 1977. The last buildings were demolished in 1993. Tim Spellman’s design was selected from several proposals for its unique interpretation of the industrial heritage of the Brickworks. Made of brick segments, Kullas Incubator reflects the original buildings and brick kilns of the site. The sculpture was incorporated into the remediation of the site into parkland which serves as a sanctuary for bird life and people.




ART EXPRESS HSC visual arts exhibition

15 May - 1 August 2010

The annual exhibition of HSC works of art includes the outstanding work of Hunter Region ARTEXPRESS students. Selected and curated for the first time by the Gallery, and presented in association with the NSW Department of Education and Training and the Officer of the Board of Studies NSW.

Download the ARTEXPRESS 2010 Education Kit (6.3mb PDF)
Investigate the works of art and their Conversations with the Collection
Read the Curatorial Statement

Check out the Behind the Scenes photos

 

LINKS

New South Wales Department of Education and Training
ARTEXPRESS Board of Studies NSW 
Inside ARTEXPRESS at AGNSW

 

EVENTS

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm - 7.00pm
Tuesday 18 May

Join the Gallery's Public Programs Officer Penelope Finnigan and student artists as they talk on their works of art and their ARTEXPRESS experience.
$20, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Guided tours
11.00am - 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Artsounds
5.30pm - 8.30pm
Friday 16 July

This program brings music and art together. Follow musicians from Hunter St Tafe to Watt Space, The Conservatorium of Music, the Lovett Gallery and culminating at the Gallery at 8.00pm.
Free

Children/Youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am - 12.30pm
Tuesday 6 to Friday 9 July

Ages 5-8 and ages 9-12
$22

Education
Artist forum**
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Friday 11 June
Hear from ARTEXPRESS student artists about the development of their body of work and their inspiration.
Free

Teachers' Professional Development Day
9.00am - 5.00pm
Monday 17 May
Investigate this year's exhibition and expand your understanding of classroom and artists' practice.
$120 (payable to ARTEXPRESS)
Bookings: http://artexpress.pau.nsw.edu.au/workshops

In-depth drawing workshops
3.30pm - 5.30pm
Tuesdays 1, 8, 15 & 22 June

Students investigate drawing materials and techniques by working with professional artists in the Gallery.
For senior students years 10-12
$80 (payable to ARTEXPRESS)
Bookings: http://artexpress.pau.nsw.edu.au/workshops

Focus tour available**
Free

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am – 12.00pm
Wednesday 7 July
The Gallery’s Program Manager Tristan Sharp discusses ARTEXPRESS, which this year features fourteen works of artby Hunter and Central Coast students.
$10 Members/conc., $15 non-members
RSVP: 02 4974 5123

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112

 

ARTEXPRESS Major Sponsor: Integral Energy
Support Sponsors: S&S Creativity unlimited and the University of Western Sydney,
Press Media Partner: The Sydney Morning Herald
Radio Partner: ABC Radio
Official Artexpress Carrier: Grace
Patron:the Sir William Dobell Art Foundation







MATERIAL REALITY Sculpture from the collection

30 June - 12 August 2012

Exploring the tradition of assemblage and the artists’ considered use of objects, materials or techniques out of context. Artists include Alexander Seton with his mastery of traditional stone carving, Kathy Temin’s detailed faux fur landscapes and Danie Mellor’s revival of old travel trunks that all serve to reinvent the use and meaning of objects and materials in contemporary sculpture.

Adults
Curators’ Talk
Friday 3 August
6.00pm – 7.30pm
Join curatorial staff as they discuss sculpture from the collection.
Free

Children / youth
School holiday workshops*
10.30am - 12.30pm
9-13 July
$15

Education
Sculpture Study and Workshop Day**
Thursday 26 July
9.00am – 3.00pm
Open to nominated Year 11 students who are interested in sculptural practice. A partnership with Hunter Street TAFE.
Limited spaces - nominate your student early.
$45

Focus tour available**
Free

Resources
smART space resource centre
Exposure - artist+student+documentary
Primary and Secondary digital education resource


Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
**Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




ALMANAC The gift of Ann Lewis AO

25 August - 11 November 2012

From the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney

 

Organised by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia (MCA) ALMANAC The Gift of Ann Lewis AO provides an extraordinary road map of Australian art practice over the last 50 years, shaped by the vision of one of Australia’s most highly regarded collectors and arts supporters.

The exhibition reflects a collection with depth - it follows changes in taste, influence, styles and ideas. Spanning across time and diverse locations, it comprises paintings, photography sculpture, ceramics and printmaking. The exhibition includes several works which will be on public display for the first time including John Olsen’s work of art commissioned by Ann for her dining room ceiling, The sea sun of 5 bells 1964.

ALMANAC The Gift of Ann Lewis AO is a fitting tribute to the quality of the distinctly personal collection from which it came.


Art Gallery Society
Coffee with art
Wednesday 5 September
10.30am – 12.00 noon
Refreshments included. RSVP essential 4974 5123
$10 members / $15 non-members
Museum of Contemporary Art Australia curator Glenn Barkley talks about the legacy of Ann Lewis AO.


Youth
Quick Draw
For young people 14 and older
Friday 5 and Saturday 6 October
3.00pm – 4.30pm
No bookings required
Free
Join Gallery educators for free life drawing classes inspired by the works on display in Almanac.


Special Event

Directors in conversation
Sunday 14 October
3.00pm - 4.30pm
Free
To celebrate the culmination of the MCA's successful touring exhibition, Newcastle Art Gallery invites the Directors of these institutions who enjoyed the great generosity and friendship of Ann Lewis to tell stories and reflect on their relationships with this extraordinary woman and benefactor.

Speakers:
Ron Ramsey, Director, Newcastle Art Gallery
Elizabeth Ann Macgregor, Director, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia

Regular Programs
Public guided tours
Saturdays and Sundays
11.00am – 12.00am
No bookings required
Free
OR book a guided tour for your group at a time that suits you. Call the Gallery on 4974 5100

Art Cart
For children of all ages and their parents or carers
Saturdays and Sundays
10.30am – 12.30pm
No bookings required
Children must be accompanied by an adult
Free


Education resources
Smart Space
For those who want to know more
Compiled to support the exhibition, Smart Space is located on the first floor gallery and is available through the exhibition. For Almanac, Smart Space features a supporting books, a video resources and children’s activities.

Guided school visits
Gallery Guides are available and cater for educational groups of all ages. Call the Gallery on 4974 5100

Almanac Education Resource
Complimentary hardcopies are available at the front desk, or by mail. Call the Gallery on 4974 5100




RICHARD BROWNE A focus exhibition

30 June - 12 August 2012

A focus exhibition of seven works by Richard Browne, including two recent acquisitions to the Newcastle Art Gallery collection. Richard Browne (1776-1824) was an Irish born artist who lived in Newcastle from 1811-1817. The watercolours in this focus exhibition portray the Indigenous people from the Hunter Region and Sydney. The Newcastle collection works are exhibited in conjunction with holdings from private collections in Australia. Browne’s watercolours are an important part of the growing colonial works on paper in the Newcastle Art Gallery collection

Adults
NAIDOC week Exhibition talk
Saturday 7 July
11.00am
Join an Indigenous academic and Richard Neville, Mitchell Librarian, State Library of NSW as they discuss the convict artist Richard Browne and his subject “Coola benn, Native Chief of Ashe Island”

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with art
10.30am – 12.00 noon
Wednesday 4 July
Businessman Kerry Stokes has an extensive collection of art. Erica Persak, Executive Administrator of the collection will talk about it, including works by artist Richard Browne from the Stokes collection.
$10 members, $15 non-members
payable at the door
RSVP essential 4974 5123 or gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Bookings required for marked events
*Art Gallery 02 4974 5114
**Audience Programs 02 4974 5112

 

Full captions
Left: Richard Browne Coola-benn, Native Chief of Ashe Island Hunters River, New South Wales 1820
watercolour and bodycolour on paper, 47.0 x 36.0 cm
Purchased with assistance from Robert and Lindy Henderson, Newcastle Art Gallery Society,
Newcastle Art Gallery Foundation and the community 2010
Newcastle Art Gallery collection

Right: Richard Browne Cobbawn Wogi, Native Chief of Ashe Island Hunters River New South Wales 1820
watercolour heightened with bodycolour, 33.0 x 27.0 cm
Private collection, Melbourne




Conversations with the Collection

Aleksander Danko and Cathy Xu


ALEKSANDER DANKO

Aleksander Danko is a key figure in the development of Conceptual Art in Australia. Conceptual Art champions idea over object and in 1970 artist and writer Ian Burn offered the following succinct conclusion on Conceptual Art: "Once one understands that art is not in objects but in the completeness of the artist's concept of art, then the other functions can be eradicated and art can become more wholly art".

Danko is interested in both word play and in inverting the utility of an object. Air off the top of my head 1975 consists of altered chairs in varying states of deconstruction. This work plays with scale, creating an absurdist environment for the audience. The letters ‘ch’ are carved into the seats of the chairs, recalling school room phonics and the challenge of acquiring language.

 


Cathy Xu Bird house: Homage to Honeywill, Hall, Le Corbusier and Casebere 2009

 

CATHY XU

Bird house: Homage to Honeywill, Hall, Le Corbusier and Casebere
Sculpture
Sydney Girls High School

These works reflect my interest in traditional mosaic techniques and the mechanics of woodwork, by combining found and constructed objects and adopting aspects of Honeywill’s diverse practice in exploring the concept of ‘home’. Inspired by Hall, I have used fragmented duck eggshells to allude to the fragility and impermanence of Nature in the face of the intervention of man-made constructs. The sculptural book incorporates Le Corbusier’s philosophies on architecture, influencing my approach in arranging images for the camera, simultaneously appropriating Casebere’s postmodern practice as he manipulates the setting to create abstract shadows, patterns, lighting and textures in his photography.

 

 







MATTHEW PERCEVAL Portrait paintings

1 May - 27 June 2010

This exhibition is comprised of portraits produced by Matthew Perceval between 1967 and 1981, while living and working in France and Australia. Perceval’s portraits of fellow artists, villagers, poets, his family and himself are characterised by an expressive and spontaneous approach.  

 

Adults
Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm - 7.00pm
Tuesday 1 June
$20, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.


Guided tours
11.00am - 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

 

Education
General tour available**
Free
 

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am - 12.00pm
Wednesday 2 June
The Gallery's Curatorial Consultant Lisa Slade explores the portraits of Matthew Perceval.
$10 Members/conc., $15 non-members
RSVP: 02 4974 5123

 

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




VIRTUAL ENCOUNTERS Paula Dawson holograms

11 September - 7 November 2010

This survey of Paula’s Dawson’s unique practice, developed in collaboration with Macquarie University, explores how Dawson simulates and evokes complex temporal states of being though holographic imagery.

 

Adults
Artist talk for TINA*
11.00am - 12.00pm
Saturday 2 October
Join artist Paula Dawson as she talks about her work.

Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 19 October
Featuring Exhibition Curator Rhonda Davis.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Public lecture*
5.30pm – 6.30pm
Friday 22 October
Art historian and Fellow of the British Academy Dr John Gage will talk on the meaning of colour, and our notions of 'good' and 'bad' colours.
Free

Art Appreciation lecture series*
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Tuesday 2 November
Dr John Holdsworth, Senior Lecturer in Physics at The University of Newcastle, will talk on the science behind Paula Dawson's work.
$22, $15 Art Gallery Society/conc.

Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

 

Education
Focus tour available**
Free

 

Resources
Catalogue available

 

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
** Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




194-year-old Wallis album unveiled at the Gallery

 

The most significant pictorial artefact to have been made in colonial NSW during the 1810s will go on display, for the first time ever, at Newcastle Art Gallery from 20 to 26 February 2012.

 

The 194-year-old Wallis Album features 35 watercolours and drawings of Sydney, regional views of NSW, portraits of Aborigines and natural history illustrations. It was made in Newcastle by Captain James Wallis, Commandant of the city between 1816 and 1818, and convict artist Joseph Lycett.

 

The album was found in the back of a cupboard in a deceased estate in Ontario, Canada in October last year before the State Library of NSW secured its passage home to Australia for $1.8 million.

 

Director Ron Ramsey says Wallis loved Newcastle and had a great interest in art and drawing.

 

“We’re delighted and honoured that this significant historical document, created in our region in 1818, is having its first ever public outing at Newcastle Art Gallery.”

 

“It’s a remarkable piece of our city’s colonial history and we are thrilled to be partnering with the State Library to share this important example of cultural heritage with the residents of Newcastle.”

 

“It includes painted named portraits of Awakabal Aboriginal people from the Newcastle area, which are incredibly rare records of this community’s ancestors.”

 

While on show, the album will be opened at a Lycett view of Sydney Cove as well as one of Wallis’ portraits of Burgun, an Aboriginal companion with whom he shared many hunting expeditions.

 

In addition, it will be shown with significant historical works from the gallery’s own collection including Inner view of Newcastle 1818 by Joseph Lycett, one of three Lycett paintings held by the Gallery. There will also be two water colour portraits of local Awabakal people, Coola-benn, native chief of Ashe Island 1820 and Burgun 1820 by colonial artist Richard Browne.

 

Newcastle residents will be fascinated to learn that the Wallis album includes early sketches of paintings by Lycett that are featured on the Macquarie Collector’s Chest c. 1818, which Wallis gave to Governor Macquarie to thank him for his patronage.

 

Event details
What: Official unveiling of the Wallis Album
Where: Newcastle Art Gallery
When: Monday 20 February, 10am




Final Artcart Saturday 24 April 2010

 

For the past two years, Newcastle Region Art Gallery has hosted ArtNRG, an arts program for children with a central focus on the popular Artcart weekend program. To date this program has been generously funded by the Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation.

 

However with this funding coming to completion in April 2010 the Gallery will regretfully suspend the program until alternate funding opportunities are secured.

 

The Gallery thanks the Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation for its support of visual arts programs for children and families.







Celebrate your inner Sacred Space with Yoga in the Gallery

 

Novocastrians are invited to retreat from the world and find solace within the tranquility of Newcastle Region Art Gallery on Saturday 1 May 2010, as the Gallery hosts Yoga in the Gallery to coincide with the opening of three new exhibitions celebrating the spiritual in art.

 

The Forum will run the morning yoga class in the Gallery space, surrounded by the works of art in the exhibitions SACRED SPACES The spiritual and the collection, SHIGEO SHIGA A focus exhibition and MATTHEW PERCEVAL Portrait paintings, on display in the Gallery until 27 June 2010.

 

Despite the increasingly secular nature of our society, many artists continue to strive towards an essence or underlying spiritual dimension in their work. In SACRED SPACES The spiritual and the collection a space beyond the world of appearances is revealed.

 

Drawn from the Gallery’s collection, SACRED SPACES features important works of art by Australian artists Marion Borgelt, John Coburn, Margery Edwards, Tim Johnson, Emily Kngwarreye, Gloria Petyarre and Judy Watson.

 

The exploration of the sacredness of art continues in the exhibition SHIGEO SHIGA A focus exhibition. Shiga is considered one of the most significant Japanese ceramists, and his work is underpinned by the philosophy that each object must be individually treated to ensure that it possesses its own personality, spirit and presence.

 

In 1966 Shiga came to Australia where he lived for fifteen years. During this time he experimented with local clay and glazes in response to the Australian landscape and had a profound influence on Australian ceramists. This focus exhibition presents a selection of Shiga’s work from the collection.

 

Finally, in MATTHEW PERCEVAL Portrait paintings, the audience is invited to connect with the artistic vision of Newcastle-based painter Matthew Perceval. Comprising of portraits painted by Perceval between 1967 and 1981, while living and working in France and Australia, this exhibition celebrates artist’s expressive and spontaneous approach.

 

SACRED SPACES The spiritual and the collection, SHIGEO SHIGA A focus exhibition and MATTHEW PERCEVAL Portrait paintings will be opened 5.30pm Friday 30 April 2010, and will be on display in the Gallery until 27 June 2010.  

 

Yoga in the Gallery will be held at 8.30am Saturday 1 May 2010. Cost is $15, and bookings can be made on 4974 5114. For detailed exhibitions and event information www.nag.org.au




Conversations with the Collection

Sarah Smuts-Kennedy & Andrew Edwards

Collection Statement:

Upon her first visit to Newcastle, New Zealand artist Sarah Smuts-Kennedy was confronted by the dominating presence of the large coal ships as they entered and departed Newcastle Harbour. This experience generated a sculptural project that commented on the coal industry in Newcastle whilst acting as an allegory of human folly.

In her practice, Smuts-Kennedy uses intricately moulded synthetic clay plinths to display both gilded and ungilded chunks of coal. The creation of elaborate, hand moulded plinths act as the foundations for such adorned treasures of the natural world. It is in this mode of working that makes the artwork, Pyramid Scheme 2009 reminiscent of the highly precious artifacts and trophies of the Baroque era that also highlights the ever present human desire for trophies of success.

Smuts-Kennedy’s work comments on society’s admiration for treasure, coupled with an underlying environmental message that forces the viewer to question the impact of industry within society.


Andrew Edwards - Blue Catastophe’s and Other Natural Disasters (detail) (2011)

Andrew Edwards
St Aloysius College
Blue Catastrophe's and Other Natural Disasters (detail) (2011)
Ceramics

ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

My body of work explores the textures and surfaces evident in nature; the use of paper clay has allowed me to investigate the naturally-occurring patterns of the Australian landscape, particularly the colours and forms of erosion. My sculpture and ceramics are influenced by the witnessing of natural disasters - their destructive force and creative potential. By making impressions in the clay I have explored contour and form in a style reminiscent of the Papunya Tula artists of the Central Western Desert, but have also made reference to geometric structures.

 

Curriculum Linkages
Frames:
Describe both works of art creating a list of key words. Outline the emotional impact each work has on you considering similarities and differences both physically and conceptually in your response.

Conceptual Framework:
Both artists have created works of art that have multipe pieces. Consider the different methods of display chosen for each work. Write a proposal to a gallery explaining an alternate way of displaying each work.

Practice:
All materials have an inherent conceptual meaning. Analyse the use of gold leaf in Smuts-Kennedy’s work. Does Edwards’ choice of clay add to the conceptual ideas behind his work? Justify your answer.

Download ARTEXPRESS 2012 Conversation with the Collections.




Conversations with the Collection

Cedric Flower & Tegan Baker

Collection Statement:

Through elegant and captivating subtlety, Cedric Flower depicted the urban areas of Sydney and Melbourne contrasted with work by artists directly preceding him. Through his art practice, Flower tried to escape hard edge representations and moved towards creating evocative works that belied extensive interpretation. Sydney Terrace 1966 illustrates his appreciation for the architecture of the post 1850s era. His ability to convey these architectural structures encouraged a greater awareness and artistic appreciation for their unique charm and history.


Tegan Baker - I'm not here, I'm there (detail) - 2011

Tegan Baker
Warners Bay High School
I'm not here, I'm there (detail) (2011)
Painting

ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

During this HSC year I somehow developed a deep affi nity to place - the subject of my artwork, the Italian cities of Cinque Terre. It was a place that I’d never visited. At first, it was the relationship between the textures and architectural form of the buildings that appealed to me, much like Brett Whiteley’s fascination with Paris. But during the creation of my work the free expressive style became a catharsis, untamed by any rule, formula or barrier. It was a symbol of an escape. I wished that I was not here, but there.

Curriculum Linkages
Frames:
Discuss how painters Flower and bakeruse their medium to evoke a time and place. Focus on the romantic perspective that both artists take of their subject matter.

Conceptual Framework:
How have both artists drawn on the world of architecture and imagination to express their ideas about escaping the ‘real’ world.

Practice:
How has Baker incorporated the board on which she paints into her images? Evaluate how the use of this material and her restraint in these painting has contributed to the success of the work.

Download ARTEXPRESS 2012 Conversation with the Collections.




Conversations with the Collection

Peter Speight & Meg Salter

Collection Statement:

Sculptor Peter Speight explores complex social themes through his works of art. The use of recycled wood as the dominant medium intertwines both social and environmental concepts.

Upon first impression, these seemingly naive works appear to hold childish values due to their slightly comical appearance. However, despite this apparent ‘simplicity’ of form, Speight arouses complex issues about the human condition such as violence and hubris. Speight’s use of organic materials is also an allegorical statement about environmental and human destruction.


Meg Salter - Pelicanus Australiensus - 2011

Meg Salter
St Francis Xavier's College
Pelicanus Australiensus (2011)
Sculpture

 

ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

A crowd of twisted things;
A twisted branch upon the beach
Eaten smooth, and polished
As if the world gave up
The secret of its skeleton.’
Rhapsody on a windy night,
T S Eliot.

For my major work I have studied the form of the Australian pelican, exploring its identity and habits through observation.

 

Curriculum Linkages
Frames:
Both Speight and Salter use recycled timber. Found materials are commonly considered a Post Modern idea. How does the choice of found materials impact the effectiveness of the artist’s ideas and messages?

Conceptual Framework:
Descirbe why both artists work would be catergorised as naive? How does this statergy work to express their concepts and show the essence of their subjects?

Practice:
List the process you believe each sculptor went through to create their work. Finish the list by describing the differences between the finishes of each artist work. Discuss these choices.

Download ARTEXPRESS 2012 Conversation with the Collections.




Conversations with the Collection

Lionel Bawden & Stephanie Taylor


Collection Statement:

Sydney based artist Lionel Bawden explores the tangible and sublime growth of ideas within an individual’s imagination achieved through his meticulously crafted organic and sculptural forms.

Bawden’s use of coloured pencils as the dominant sculptural medium contrasts the rigid machine made individual pencils with the elegant and sensual forms of the sculpture. This demonstrates a strong contrast between the confined physical world and the thriving landscape of the mind.

Bawden’s work also explores the transformation from early childhood familiarity to myriad possibilities of the adult imagination. The recurring organic honeycomb motif is reminiscent of beehives, and alludes to the microcosms of cellular organisms existing in our world and the endless possibilities surrounding them.


Stephanie Taylor - Dynamics of Roy - 2011

Stephanie Taylor
Hunter Valley Grammar School
Dynamics of Roy (2011)
Sculpture


ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

Dynamics of Roy is an appropriation of Rhythmic composition in yellow green minor (1919) by Roy de Maistre. My work discovers the dimensions within his two-dimensional work and represents them in a three-dimensional form. This allows viewers to see the many different levels within de Maistre’s work and to explore new angles. As de Maistre’s work evolved a theory of colour harmonisation based on analogies between colours of the spectrum and the musical scale, recreating the work in 3D adds another perspective, where high and low points represent the different tones and the different pitches in music.


Curriculum Linkages
Frames:

Analyse with reference to the structural frame how both artists have used rhythm, colour and form to emphasis the shape of the completed sculptures.

Conceptual Framework:

The coloured pencil has been appropriated by both artists. Is this an attempt to comment upon the changing nature of traditional art materials?
Discuss.

Practice:

Both artists have used coloured pencils as the dominant medium in their work. Discuss how these artists have manipulated their chosen medium in contrasting fashions to express their ideas.


Download ARTEXPRESS 2012 Conversation with the Collections.




Conversations with the Collection

Fiona Hall & Annika Smit

Collection Statement:

Contemporary artist Fiona Hall’s divergent art practice encompasses photography, sculpture, video art, painting and three-dimensional installation. In the 1970s she pursued her art practice in the realm of photography with a specific focus on the natural environment. Having grown up in southern Sydney on the outskirts of the Royal National Park, Hall was drawn to the complexities and hidden dimensions within the natural and organic worlds- a thread that has continued into her contemporary practice. Her three dimensional works have always blurred the boundaries of materiality, of juxtaposing the everyday object such as a sardine tin into a critically engaged piece of art. Her early photographic work such as Leura New South Wales, 1974, confuses normal perceptions of materiality, with the scene blending into a potential bush landscape, with a leaf strewn ‘carpet’ in the foreground. The ‘real’ internal environment of carpet and lounge suite is blurred into a textural landscape that belies its safe and domestic reality. Hall comments on the proliferation of exotic plant species in the natural environment set against the artificial setting of the domestic lounge room as a broader metaphor for the negative impacts of humans on the environment.


Annika Smit - Macro musings (detail) - 2011

Annika Smit
Callaghan College, Jesmond Campus
Macro musings (detail) (2011)
Photomedia

 

ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

My work embodies the things that inspire and interest me … the little things that others are often unable to see … the beauty of our instruments, or the intricacy of the forgotten. I have always felt black and white is a more empowering and inspirational media form when compared to colour, and I aimed to convey the power of the small and beautiful through the use of strong shades and tones. My work is everything the title suggests personal musings on the world that goes unseen around us, revealed through macro (close-up) photography

 

Curriculum Linkages
Frames:
Examine the works of Smit and Hall. Analyse how the close cropping of objects confuses the eye and creates the illusion of a different world.

Conceptual Framework:
Discuss the role of the artist in drawing an audience’s attention to everyday details that are overlooked in order to manipulate or create a specific viewpoint.

Practice:
Analyse how both artists have utilised simple structural elements to frametheir subject and focus the audience’s attention.

Download ARTEXPRESS 2012 Conversation with the Collections.




Conversations with the Collection

Cressida Campbell & Moira Peddie

Collection Statement:

Sydney based artist Cressida Campbell portrays her own environment through the detailed and refined creation of woodblock prints. After travelling to Japan, Campbell developed an interest in the technique of traditional woodblock printing and realised its potential as an effective medium for her work. With precision, Campbell focuses on interiors and still lives, evidenced through acute observation, drawing skills and balanced composition. Despite their contemporary and western subject matter, Campbell’s expertly crafted pieces resonate the traditions of Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, rather than western forms of realism. While she predominately focuses on the everyday, Cressida Campbell uses a primal affinity for form and pattern, a fusion of line, colour and subject, as well as harmony of subtle decoration. These works are discrete enquiries about the self and express a sense of introspection. The colours used within the prints appear to carry greater intensity than traditional watercolours that flood the images with a sense of light.


Moira Peddie - The Art of the Domestic (detail ) - 2011

Moira Peddie
Hunter School of Performing Arts
The Art of the Domestic (detail) (2011)
Painting

ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

The art of the domestic is a representation of my house. A place so familiar to me with many associations. I have painted its interiors, capturing recognisable household objects and colours. Objects from famous artworks have been appropriated into these scenes, becoming details of the everyday in my house, just as they once were before they were immortalised in paint. Through my art I aimed to capture the joy of the domestic and the everyday. I presented my work within four panels as our home is a typical four-sided dwelling.

Curriculum Linkages
Frames:
Research the processes and methodology of traditional woodblock printing. Now using the structural frame discuss how Moria Peddie has captured the essence of a woodblock print using paint.

Conceptual Framework:
Peddie and Campbell both represent scenes of the domestic and everyday home environment traditionally the domain of women. How have these two artists expressed a uniquely feminine gaze?

Practice:
Investigate how Campbell adapts traditional woodblock printing for her own purposes and how the way she works changes the notion of what a print is.

Download ARTEXPRESS 2012 Conversation with the Collections.




Conversations with the Collection

Jasper Knight & Joseph Chun Yin Ku 

Collection Statement:

Contemporary Australian painter, sculptor and installation artist Jasper Knight’s work contains elements of a figurative, expressionistic and a neo pop-art style, which have been compared to American artists of the 1940s.

Inspired by a desire to represent his ideas with this pop aesthetic, Knight embraces the constructed nature of contemporary life with a heightened sense of energy and immediacy. By creating densely layered assemblages incorporating found objects, road signs, coloured perspex and textured wood panels, Knight questions the value of traditional painting and denotes the shift from traditional landscapes to portrayals of the urban-landscape.

Through these seemingly spontaneous constructions and multilayered assemblages, Knight also comments on the lost optimism of the past and highlights the rapid shift from traditional art forms into new stylistic representation of modern built environments.


Joseph Chun Yin Ku - Lost in Transmission (detail) - 2011

Joseph Chun Yin Ku
Normanhurst Boys High School
Lost In Transmission (detail) (2001)
Drawing


ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

With the technological advances in our society almost everybody owns a handheld telecommunications device. Lost in transmission addresses this notion and the impact it has on our daily lives. Have you ever boarded a train during peak hour? Despite the overcrowded spaces, the predominant sources of noise are the screeching of the wheels against the tracks, message alerts and phone calls. All the passengers sit tight facing a uniform direction, immersed in their own individual sphere.

Curriculum Linkages
Frames:
With reference to the Post Modern Frame discuss Chun Yin Ku’s use of pop art style, colour and subject matter.

Conceptual Framework:
Both artists address the changing landscapes of modern life. Evaluate the success of each artist in portraying this concept. Consider the appropriation of a pop art aesthetic in your response.

Practice:
Pegboard is a commerical pre-drilled ready-made board most commonly used to hang tools in workshops and garages. Analyse how both artists have incorporated this material in their work. Does the knowledge of its purpose influence your reaction to the works? Why?

Download ARTEXPRESS 2012 Conversation with the Collections.




Conversations with the Collection

Hikaru Yamada & Kassandra Bangle

Collection Statement:

Hikaru Yamada was among a group of Japanese potters who were seeking to use clay as an expressive medium in its own right without the need to conform to a functional aesthetic. This group collectively exhibited their work as the Sodeisha Group in the 1950s.The Sodeisha Collection held by Newcastle Art Gallery consists of purely sculptural or non-functional objects that still express the particular qualities of clay and glaze which has influenced contemporary ceramics.

In 1978 an exhibition of works by Sodeisha artists toured Australia, organised by Newcastle Art Gallery. On completion of the tour the group donated work to Newcastle Art Gallery in recognition of the its commitment to Japanese ceramics.


Kassandra Bangle - Algorithm of Man 6 - 2011

Kassandra Bangle
Newcastle High School
Algorithm of Man - 6 (2011)
Sculpture

ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

Frigyes Karinthy’s theory of ‘the six degrees of separation’ refers to the idea that everyone is on average approximately six steps away, by way of introduction, from any other person on Earth. So that a chain of, “a friend of a friend” statements can be made, on average, to connect any two people in six steps or fewer. In my work, ‘Algorithm of Man’ I examine the idea of a ‘shrinking world’ and a human web that is created by the six degrees of separation. Also how modern technology caters for social networking, making this theory easily confi rmed. My work also incorporates the questions raised by the song ‘Little Boxes’ by Marvin Reynolds.

Such as the commonalities in mankind, and related this idea to the idea of a shrinking world. ‘Little Boxes’ states, ‘they were put in boxes, And they came out all the same’. In the work I have also used birthdates as a symbol of unique identification in the human race.

 

Curriculum Linkages
Frames:
Evaluate the signifi cance of an individual artist’s world and culture in informing their work.

Conceptual Framework:
Bangle explores the idea of ‘the six degrees of separation’. Use this theory to create your own connection between these two works of art can it be done in six steps or less?

Practice:
How have Bangle and Yamada used materials to express their ideas? Discuss whether materiality and the essence of a material is equally important to both artists.




Conversations with the Collection

Gwyn Hanssen Piggot & Tiarne Mitchell

Collection Statement:

South Australian contemporary ceramic artist, Gwyn Hanssen Pigott’s creative practice follows both Oriental and European traditions of utilitarian and functional ceramics. With clarity of vision and precision, Hanssen Pigott creates harmonised clusters of refined domestic ceramic objects in rhythmic procession. These three dimensional still lives express cohesion and spatial balance through the representation of decorative rather than utilitarian forms. Reminiscent of Giorgio Morandi’s painted assemblages; Hanssen Pigott’s works demonstrate immense skill and technical resolve whilst also encouraging the viewer to meditate on the importance and aesthetic value of everyday objects. Constructed in domestic scale with the use of subtle glazes and tonal harmonies, these works demonstrate control and balance coupled with an elegance of line and proportion. In addition to their immense technical precision, these works are symbolic of the nature of change. They also resonate the importance of materiality and the way that assemblage creates unity as a complete body of work, rather than the sum of their individual pieces.


Tiarne Mitchell - Less is more - 2011

Tiarne Mitchell
Gosford High School
Less is more (2011)
Painting (detail)


ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

My work is influenced by Gwyn Hanssen Pigott’s still-life compositions of hand-crafted porcelain vessels and, like her, by Giorgio Morandi’s subject matter and tone. Like them, my intention is to create still-lifes that examine the simple beauty in everyday objects. I use varying shades of white to demonstrate that only subtle tonal variances and textures are necessary for an audience to distinguish objects within a work. However, my overt purpose is to convey how, in a society where art has become so drenched in social commentary, less is more.

Curriculum Linkages
Frames:
Discuss the tonal qualities and simplicity of Tiarne Mitchell and Gwyn Hansen Pigott work. How do these qualities reference the everyday, the mundane and the ordinary?

Conceptual Framework:
Hanssen Piggot has used porcelain and Mitchell drawing to explore the still life tradition. How does the choice of materials between the two artists influence an audiences understanding and reading of these works?

Practice:
Analyse the challenges these artist have faced using a limited colour palette. How does this self imposed restriction relate to the expression of the artists’ concept?


Download ARTEXPRESS 2012 Conversation with the Collections.




ARTEXPRESS HSC Visual Arts Exhibition

5 May - 1 July 2012

The annual exhibtion, including the outstanding work of Hunter Visual Arts students. Presented in association with NSW Department of Education and Training and the Office of the Board of Studies NSW.

Adults
Guided tours
11.00am – 12.00pm
Saturdays and Sundays
Free

Education
Teachers’ Professional Development Day**
9.30am – 4.00pm
Monday 30 April
Teachers’ Development Day in conjunction with NSW Department of Education and Training.
$50

Student Forum**
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Friday 1 June
Hear from ARTEXPRESS student artists about the development of their final year body of work.
Free

Life after ARTEXPRESS**
6.00pm
Friday 15 June
Join former ARTEXPRESS exhibitors for a discussion of life and art after school.
Free

Focus tour available**
Free

Resources
Education resource: Conversations with Collections
Conversations with the Collection online
Exposure - artist+student+documentary

Art Gallery Society
Coffee with Art
10.30am - 12.00pm
Wednesday 2 May
$10 members, $15 non-members
Assistant Director Tristan Sharp explores the ideas behind ARTEXPRESS.

 

Bookings required for marked events
* RSVP 02 4974 5114
**Contact Public Programs 02 4974 5112




Conversations with the Collection

James Gleeson & Sheree Budworth

Collection Statement:

James Gleeson’s works of art are thematically apocalyptic and organically surreal. The intimacy, detail and highly resolved nature of Gleeson’s suggestive style encourages the viewer to delve into this imagined world.

Meticulous in execution, whilst still containing elements of obscurity, Gleeson’s Baudelaire: The salon of 1895: The governance of the imagination 1976, demonstrates through tonal contrast, the creation of sublime landscapes that highlight the drama of creation. Through use of both ink wash and collage, Gleeson explores his internal imaginings of dream-like reality, biblical creations and the dynamism of nature.


Sheree Budworth - Perfection at Samuri Beach = The Golden Mean (detail) (2011)

Sheree Budworth
Maitland Grossmann High School
Perfection at Samurai Beach = The Golden Mean (detail) (2011)
Collection of works

 

ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

My artwork represents the secluded and accepting naturalist beach Samurai on the south coast of NSW. The work is open to interpretation but in making it I had in mind the feel of the natural environment and the beautiful people who are proud of who they are in their entirety, and the not so confident people who are able to accept them strolling by. I struggled at first, aware that my audience is not always able to look beyond societal perceptions of image to see the perfection of the body and its place in nature. Colour easily became my self-expression.

Curriculum Linkages
Frames:
Discuss the importance of composition in surrealist works to create meaning and narrative.

Conceptual Framework:
Explore the importance of the artist’s and the audience’s personal experiences and the effect these would have on their interpretation of the works.

Practice:
Analyse the function of colour within these works. Compare and contrast the use of vibrant colour in Budworth’s work with the monochromatic style of Gleeson’s work. Propose how colour is both a formal as well as a conceptual strategy used by each artist.

Download ARTEXPRESS 2012 Conversation with the Collections.




Collection Statement:

Brett Whiteley is renowned for his organic depiction of the Australian landscape. Through fluid use of line, iconic imagery and a highly stylised palette, Summer at Carcoar 1977 conveys the radiating Australian heat, the starkness of the landscape and the hidden treasures that reside within.

The sensual contours of the river winding through the length of the painting, parallel with the curvature of road in the upper right hand corner. Whiteley’s signature use of collage and interplay of materials such as stones in the painting, underpin the hidden dimensions of the landscape.

Summer at Carcoar was commissioned by Newcastle Art Gallery benefactor Sir William Bowmore in 1977 and was awarded the Wynne Prize for landscape painting in the same year.


 Samuel Cutcher - Rivers (detail) - 2011

Samuel Cutcher
Chatswood High School
Rivers (detail) (2011)
Collection of works

ARTEXPRESS Artist Statement:

I have lived my whole life in sight of the river, around which lives a spirit: the old man of the river. The banksia is a symbol of this spirit, gnarled and bearded. This also describes my father - as old as men get - who walks and wades in the rocky mountain rivers. Through my chosen media I have attempted to explore the character of these old men.

Curriculum Linkages
Frames:
Both Whiteley and Cutcher use the organic qualities of a curving river as a device with which to construct their images their images. Using the frames discuss the effect this has on the structural and emotive reading of this work.

Conceptual Framework:
Analyse how both works capture the essence of a landscape painting without being photo realistic renderings of a specific location.

Practice:
Assess how effective Whiteley’s choices of colours, tones and techniques are in representing the experience of the Australian landscape. Describe how these choices may have influenced Cutcher’s work.

Download ARTEXPRESS 2012 Conversation with the Collections.

Adults

Sunday, 1 May, 2011

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Every Saturday and Sunday at 11am, the Gallery runs a free guided tour of current exhibitions. Meet gallery guide at front desk.

Children

Sunday, 1 May, 2011

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people. Running both days of the weekend, ARTCART is a great fun way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Sunday, 1 May, 2011

2.00pm
Music in the Gallery
Bookings Not Required


Violinist Susan Collins will present the following pieces:

J.S. Bach - Partita # 2
Allemanda
Corrente
Sarabanda
Giga
Ciaccona

E. Yasye - Sonate #3 (Ballade)

Paganini - Caprice # 24

Music in the Gallery is presented in collaboration with The Conservatorium of Music, The University of Newcastle.
Free

Art Gallery Society

Wednesday, 4 May, 2011

10.30am - 12.00pm
Coffee with Art
Bookings Required


Curator Una Rey provides insight into the language of speaking in colour in Indigenous art.
$10 members/$15 non-members. RSVP4974 5123

Education

Friday, 6 May, 2011

11.00am - 1.00pm
Artist demonstration and discussion


Artists Ivy Pareroultja and Lenie Namatjira from the Ngurratjuta Art Centre will spend the morning painting new works of art in the Gallery.
Curator of Speaking in Colour Una Rey and Iris Bendor from the Ngurratjuta Art Centre will facilitate an informal discussion with the artists while they work. Visitors will have the opportunity to ask questions and interact with the artists.
School groups are encouraged to attend. Book on 02 4974 5114.

Adults

Friday, 6 May, 2011

11.00am
Artist talks and workshops
Bookings Required


Meet Indigenous artists whose work is included in the exhibition Speaking in Colour. A day of talks and demonstrations in conjunction with this exciting exhibition.

Adults

Saturday, 7 May, 2011

11.00am - 1.00pm
Artist demonstration and discussion


Artists Ivy Pareroultja and Lenie Namatjira from the Ngurratjuta Art Centre will spend the morning painting new works of art in the Gallery.
Curator of Speaking in Colour Una Rey and Iris Bendor from the Ngurratjuta Art Centre will facilitate an informal discussion with the artists while they work. Visitors will have the opportunity to ask questions and interact with the artists.
ArtCart activities will also be taking place.

Children

Saturday, 7 May, 2011

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people. Running both days of the weekend, ARTCART is a great fun way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 7 May, 2011

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Every Saturday and Sunday at 11am, the Gallery runs a free guided tour of current exhibitions. Meet gallery guide at front desk.

Adults

Saturday, 14 May, 2011

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Every Saturday and Sunday at 11am, the Gallery runs a free guided tour of current exhibitions. Meet gallery guide at front desk.

Children

Saturday, 14 May, 2011

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people. Running both days of the weekend, ARTCART is a great fun way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Children

Saturday, 21 May, 2011

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people. Running both days of the weekend, ARTCART is a great fun way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 21 May, 2011

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Every Saturday and Sunday at 11am, the Gallery runs a free guided tour of current exhibitions. Meet gallery guide at front desk.

Adults

Thursday, 26 May, 2011

5.30pm
National Sorry Day
Bookings Required


Join us at the Gallery to celebrate and remember this important event.
Free

Children

Saturday, 28 May, 2011

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people. Running both days of the weekend, ARTCART is a great fun way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 28 May, 2011

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Every Saturday and Sunday at 11am, the Gallery runs a free guided tour of current exhibitions. Meet gallery guide at front desk.

Adults

Sunday, 29 May, 2011

2.00pm
Jazz in the Gallery
Bookings Required


Join us for a classical piano program of works once enjoyed by William Rose. This event coincides with the closing of the exhibition WILLIAM ROSE Composing space.
Free

Children

Saturday, 3 March, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Family

Saturday, 3 March, 2012

5.30pm
Late night opening
Bookings Not Required


Join us in celebration of the exhibition of Australian Modern Masterpieces with a late night opening that includes live music and performances. In conjunction with L!VESITES. Free with exhibition entry fee.

Children

Saturday, 3 March, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 3 March, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Adults

Sunday, 4 March, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Art Gallery Society

Wednesday, 7 March, 2012

10.30am - 12.00pm
Coffee with Art
Bookings Required


Director Ron Ramsey discusses the generous donations made by Margaret Olley to the collection, and her support of young and emerging artists.
$10 members, $15 non-members, payable at the door.
RSVP 02 4974 5123

Adults

Thursday, 8 March, 2012

2.00pm
International Women's Day
Bookings Not Required


A Generous Spirit: Margaret Olley Remembered
Olley's close friend art historian Christine France and the Gallery's curator discuss her work as both artist and benefactor.
Free

Children

Saturday, 10 March, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 10 March, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Adults

Sunday, 11 March, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Children

Sunday, 11 March, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 17 March, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Adults

Saturday, 17 March, 2012

11.00am
Curator's talk
Bookings Not Required


Join curator Nici Cumpston for a walk through Desert Country.
Free

Children

Saturday, 17 March, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Children

Sunday, 18 March, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Sunday, 18 March, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Free Event

Thursday, 22 March, 2012

11am
Senior's Week
Bookings Required


The Newcastle Art Gallery will host a Senior’s Week event at 11am 22 March 2012 which will include a free guided tour of the exhibition LEAVING A LEGACY Margaret Olley’s Gifts to Newcastle.

After the tour, enjoy a free lunch in the Gallery space. Bookings are essential. Please phone 4974 5114 to RSVP.

Exhibition Talk

Friday, 23 March, 2012

6pm
Exhibition Talk - Gil Docking
Bookings Not Required


Join previous Director Gil Docking as he reminisces about his wife Shay Docking with the Art Gallery Foundation Committee's Gael Davies and Director Ron Ramsey.


Adults

Saturday, 24 March, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Children

Saturday, 24 March, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Children

Sunday, 25 March, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Sunday, 25 March, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Children

Saturday, 31 March, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 31 March, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Adults

Sunday, 1 April, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Children

Sunday, 1 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Art Gallery Society

Wednesday, 4 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.00pm
Coffee with Art
Bookings Required


The Gallery's recently appointed curator Sarah Johnson introduces the exhibition DESERT COUNTRY An Art Gallery of South Australia Travelling Exhibition.
$10 members, $15 non-members, payable at the door.
RSVP 02 4974 5123

Adults

Friday, 6 April, 2012

Art Gallery closed
Good Friday


Children

Saturday, 7 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 7 April, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Adults

Sunday, 8 April, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Children

Sunday, 8 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Monday, 9 April, 2012

10.00am - 5.00pm
Easter Monday


Adults

Saturday, 14 April, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Children

Saturday, 14 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Sunday, 15 April, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Children

Sunday, 15 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Children/youth

Tuesday, 17 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
School holiday workshops
Bookings Required


These school holiday workshops will focus on landscape painting, inspired by DESERT COUNTRY An Art Gallery of South Australia Travelling Exhibition.  
For ages 5-8.
$15

Children/youth

Tuesday, 17 April, 2012

2.00pm - 4.00pm
School holiday workshops
Bookings Required


These school holiday workshops will focus on landscape painting, inspired by DESERT COUNTRY An Art Gallery of South Australia Travelling Exhibition.  
For ages 5-8.
$15

School holidays

Tuesday, 17 April, 2012

3.00pm - 4.30pm
Quick draw
Bookings Not Required


Join local artists for free drawing classes for participants 14 years and over.
Free

Children/youth

Wednesday, 18 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
School holiday workshops
Bookings Required


These school holiday workshops will focus on landscape painting, inspired by DESERT COUNTRY An Art Gallery of South Australia Travelling Exhibition.  
For ages 5-8.
$15

School holidays

Wednesday, 18 April, 2012

3.00pm - 4.30pm
Quick draw
Bookings Not Required


Join local artists for free drawing classes for participants 14 years and over.
Free

Children/youth

Wednesday, 18 April, 2012

2.00pm - 4.00pm
School holiday workshops
Bookings Required


These school holiday workshops will focus on landscape painting, inspired by DESERT COUNTRY An Art Gallery of South Australia Travelling Exhibition.  
For ages 5-8.
$15

Children/youth

Thursday, 19 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
School holiday workshops
Bookings Required


These school holiday workshops will focus on landscape painting, inspired by DESERT COUNTRY An Art Gallery of South Australia Travelling Exhibition.  
For ages 9-13.
$15

Children/youth

Thursday, 19 April, 2012

2.00pm - 4.00pm
School holiday workshops
Bookings Required


These school holiday workshops will focus on landscape painting, inspired by DESERT COUNTRY An Art Gallery of South Australia Travelling Exhibition.  
For ages 9-13.
$15

School holidays

Thursday, 19 April, 2012

3.00pm - 4.30pm
Quick draw
Bookings Not Required


Join local artists for free drawing classes for participants 14 years and over.
Free

Children/youth

Friday, 20 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
School holiday workshops
Bookings Required


These school holiday workshops will focus on landscape painting, inspired by DESERT COUNTRY An Art Gallery of South Australia Travelling Exhibition.  
For ages 9-13.
$15

School holidays

Friday, 20 April, 2012

3.00pm - 4.30pm
Quick draw
Bookings Not Required


Join local artists for free drawing classes for participants 14 years and over.
Free

Children/youth

Friday, 20 April, 2012

2.00pm - 4.00pm
School holiday workshops
Bookings Required


These school holiday workshops will focus on landscape painting, inspired by DESERT COUNTRY An Art Gallery of South Australia Travelling Exhibition.  
For ages 9-13.
$15

Children

Saturday, 21 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 21 April, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Children

Sunday, 22 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Sunday, 22 April, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Adults

Saturday, 28 April, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Children

Saturday, 28 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Children

Sunday, 29 April, 2012

10.30am - 12.30pm
ARTCART
Bookings Not Required


ARTCART is the Gallery's popular hands-on art activities program for young people and is a great way to get kids making art.
Please be at the Gallery before 12.15pm to ensure you have time to finish your art activities.
Free
Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, The Caledonia Foundation, Sydney, Mega Pacific, Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Sunday, 29 April, 2012

11:00am
Guided tours
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Art Gallery Society

Wednesday, 3 September, 2014

10.30am - 12.00pm
Coffee with art
Bookings Required


Canberra Museum and Gallery Senior Curator Deborah Clark looks at the texture of light in the works of Australian landscape painter Elioth Gruner.

10.30am – 12.00pm
$15 members, $20 non–members

Payable at the door
Call 02 4974 5123 or email gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au

 

Children

Saturday, 6 September, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Drop in any time between 10.30am and 12.00pm, to ensure you have enough time to complete the activity. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

 

Art Cart is a free event, sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle, and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 6 September, 2014

11:00am - 12:00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Adults

Saturday, 6 September, 2014

2:00pm - 3:00pm
Exhibition Talk - Dr Kit Messham-Muir
Bookings Not Required


In April 2013, Dr Kit Messham Muir -aka Studiocrasher met with Carl Andre in his New York home to talk about his art practice. In this special talk, Kit will explain the significance of the 1978 exhibition of Andre’s work at Newcastle Art Gallery, before discussing other artist’s works in the exhibition. 

Free, bookings preferred, call 02 4974 5100

Children

Sunday, 7 September, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Drop in any time between 10.30am and 12.00pm, to ensure you have enough time to complete the activity. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

 

Art Cart is a free event, sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle, and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Sunday, 7 September, 2014

11:00am - 12:00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Adults

Sunday, 7 September, 2014

2:00pm - 3:00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Art Gallery Society

Thursday, 11 September, 2014

6.45pm for 7.00pm start
Dinner with friends
Bookings Required


Offsite Event
Enjoy an informal three course dinner with Gallery Society friends at Clydesdale Restaurant, Hamilton TAFE Parry Street Newcastle West

 

$30 payable on booking (drinks purchased at dinner)
RSVP essential, call 02 4926 2867 by 4 September 2014
Limited to 50 members

Children

Saturday, 13 September, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Drop in any time between 10.30am and 12.00pm, to ensure you have enough time to complete the activity. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

 

Art Cart is a free event, sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle, and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 13 September, 2014

11:00am - 12:00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions. During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Adults

Saturday, 13 September, 2014

2:00pm - 3:00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Children

Sunday, 14 September, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Drop in any time between 10.30am and 12.00pm, to ensure you have enough time to complete the activity. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

 

Art Cart is a free event, sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle, and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Sunday, 14 September, 2014

11:00am - 12:00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions. During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Adults

Sunday, 14 September, 2014

2:00pm - 3:00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Art Gallery Society

Thursday, 18 September, 2014

7.30pm - 9.00pm
Music With Art
Bookings Required


Postcards featuring the Gallery’s Stuart and Sons piano
The music of Bach, Mendelssohn and Schumann feature in a postcard from Leipzig

$30 members/concession, $40 non–members.

Bookings Required. Call 02 4974 5123 or email gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Children

Saturday, 20 September, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Drop in any time between 10.30am and 12.00pm, to ensure you have enough time to complete the activity. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

 

Art Cart is a free event, sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle, and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 20 September, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Adults

Saturday, 20 September, 2014

2.00pm - 3.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Children

Saturday, 20 September, 2014

6.00pm - 7.30pm
Torchlight Tours
Bookings Required


For children and their families
Explore the exhibition One from none: The minimal aesthetic in art

See the Gallery in a whole new light in this great, free family program. Enjoy kids art making, snacks and guided tours by torchlight. A range of glow in the dark items will be available for purchase, with all income generated funding future Torchlight Tour events.

Free, bookings required call 02 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au

 

Children

Sunday, 21 September, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Drop in any time between 10.30am and 12.00pm, to ensure you have enough time to complete the activity. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

 

Art Cart is a free event, sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle, and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Sunday, 21 September, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Adults

Sunday, 21 September, 2014

2:00pm - 3:00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Adults

Sunday, 21 September, 2014

3.00pm - 4.00pm
Sunday Music - Life is a Cabaret
Bookings Required



RESCHEDULED: Due to unavoidable circumstances, this concert has been rescheduled for Sunday 12 October 2014, 3.00pm - 4.00pm

Held in the exhibition Elioth Gruner: the texture of light, and taking inspiration from Gruner's visit to Europe as a young man in 1923, visit the Gallery for two special performances of European cabaret featuring soprano Kathleen Moore with Erin Sweetman on the Gallery's Stuart and Sons piano. 

 

Free with exhibition entry.

(General: $8, Concession/Members: $5, Children under 12: Free)

Call 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Children (School Holidays)

Tuesday, 23 September, 2014

Workshops Daily
School Holiday Workshop
Bookings Required


For children 5 – 8 years old:
10.30am – 12.30pm 

For children 8 – 12 years old:
2.30pm – 4.30pm 

$15 per child, includes all materials
Bookings and payment required. Call 02 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by works in the exhibition Elioth Gruner: the texture of light. Younger children (5-8 classes) will make landscape dioramas while older children (8-12 classes) will create 2D landscapes using colour theory and compositional techniques.

 


THIS EVENT IS FULLY SUBSCRIBED

Children (School Holidays)

Wednesday, 24 September, 2014

Workshops Daily
School Holiday Workshop
Bookings Required


For children 5 – 8 years old:
10.30am – 12.30pm 

For children 8 – 12 years old:
2.30pm – 4.30pm 

Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by works in the exhibition Elioth Gruner: the texture of light. Younger children (5-8 classes) will make landscape dioramas while older children (8-12 classes) will create 2D landscapes using colour theory and compositional techniques. 

$15 per child, includes all materials 
Bookings and payment required, call 02 4974 5100

 


THIS EVENT IS FULLY SUBSCRIBED
  

Children (School Holidays)

Thursday, 25 September, 2014

Workshops Daily
School Holiday Workshop
Bookings Required


For children 5 – 8 years old:
10.30am – 12.30pm 

Sibling friendly, 5 – 12 years old:
2.30pm – 4.30pm  

Join Gallery educators for workshops inspired by works in the exhibition. Younger children will make landscape dioramas while older children will create 2D landscapes using colour theory and compositional techniques. 

$15 per child, includes all materials 
Bookings and payment required, call 02 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au

 


THIS EVENT IS FULLY SUBSCRIBED
 

 

Art Gallery Society

Friday, 26 September, 2014

10.30am - 11.30am
Books with art
Bookings Required


Over morning tea, discuss books with art–related themes.
Moroccan Idyll Art and Orientalism by Jeanette Hoorn
The Miegunyah Press Melbourne University Publishing Ltd 2012 

$10 members only (includes morning tea)
Bookings required call 02 4974 5123 or email gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Limited to 12 places per session
Limited copies of the books will be available at the Gallery Shop

Adults

Friday, 26 September, 2014

from 6.30pm
Anniversary Piano Recital
Bookings Required


Anniversary Piano Recital

featuring Australian jazz musician Terence Koo with The Terence Koo Trio 

 

Terence Koo: piano
Peter Gray: bass
David Richardson: drums

 

Celebrate with us the acquisition of Newcastle Art Gallery’s Stuart & Sons Studio Grand Piano veneered in Tasmanian blackheart sassafras with 102 keys


Cost $50 per person

Includes wine and refreshments  

RSVP: 02 4974 5100 or at the Gallery Shop

by Wednesday 24 September 2014

Payment to be made at time of booking

Children

Saturday, 27 September, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Drop in any time between 10.30am and 12.00pm, to ensure you have enough time to complete the activity. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

 

Art Cart is a free event, sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle, and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Saturday, 27 September, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Adults

Saturday, 27 September, 2014

2.00pm - 3.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.
During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Children

Sunday, 28 September, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Drop in any time between 10.30am and 12.00pm, to ensure you have enough time to complete the activity. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

 

Art Cart is a free event, sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle, and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Adults

Sunday, 28 September, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Adults

Sunday, 28 September, 2014

2.00pm - 3.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11am and 2pm.

Adults

Sunday, 28 September, 2014

3.00pm - 4.00pm
Life is a Cabaret
Bookings Required



RESCHEDULED: Due to unavoidable circumstances, this concert has been rescheduled for Sunday 12 October 2014, 3.00pm - 4.00pm

 

Held in the exhibition Elioth Gruner: the texture of light, and taking inspiration from Gruner's visit to Europe as a young man in 1923, visit the Gallery for two special performances of European cabaret featuring soprano Kathleen Moore with Erin Sweetman on the Gallery's Stuart and Sons piano. 


Free with exhibition entry. 

(General: $8, Concession/Members: $5, Children under 12: Free)

Call 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Children

Tuesday, 30 September, 2014

2:30pm - 4:30pm
School Holiday Workshop
Bookings Required


For children 5 – 8 years old:
10.30am – 12.30pm 

For children 8 – 12 years old:
2.30pm – 4.30pm 

$15 per child, includes all materials
Bookings and payment required. Call 02 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au 

 

Join Gallery educators for clay making workshops inspired by works in the exhibitions: Absurdia: Noel McKenna - a focus and Legacy: a tribute to Gwyn Hanssen Pigott and Marea Gazzard. Younger children will make pinch pot cups and saucers and older children will explore slab construction and joining techniques to make vases decorated with text.

 


THIS EVENT IS FULLY SUBSCRIBED

Gallery Society Event - Coffee with Art

Wednesday, 1 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.00pm
Coffee with Art - morning tea followed by informative talks
Bookings Required


Freelance curator and writer Christine France OAM reflects upon the legacy of ceramicists Marea Gazzard and Gwyn Hanssen Pigott.

 

$15 members, $20 non–members

Payable at the door

Call 02 4974 5123 or email gallerysociety@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Children's School Holiday Workshops

Wednesday, 1 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm AND 2.30pm - 4.30pm
School Holiday workshops
Bookings Required


For children 5 – 8 years old:
10.30am – 12.30pm 

For children 8 – 12 years old:
2.30pm – 4.30pm

$15 per child, includes all materials

Bookings and payment required. Call 02 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au

 

Join Gallery educators for clay making workshops inspired by works in the exhibitions: Absurdia: Noel McKenna - a focus and Legacy: a tribute to Gwyn Hanssen Pigott and Marea Gazzard. 
Younger children will make pinch pot cups and saucers and older children will explore slab construction and joining techniques to make vases decorated with text.

 


THIS EVENT IS FULLY SUBSCRIBED
 

 

Children's School Holiday Workshops

Thursday, 2 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm AND 2.30pm - 4.30pm
School Holiday workshops
Bookings Required


For children 5 – 8 years old:
10.30am – 12.30pm 

SIBLING FRIENDLY CLASS - For children 5 – 12 years old:
2.30pm – 4.30pm

$15 per child, includes all materials

Bookings and payment required. Call 02 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au

 

Join Gallery educators for clay making workshops inspired by works in the exhibitions: Absurdia: Noel McKenna - a focus and Legacy: a tribute to Gwyn Hanssen Pigott and Marea Gazzard. 
Younger children will make pinch pot cups and saucers and older children will explore slab construction and joining techniques to make vases decorated with text.

 


THIS EVENT IS FULLY SUBSCRIBED
 

Free Children's Art Activity

Saturday, 4 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Children must be accompanied by an adult during Art Cart, and parents are encouraged to support younger children in their art making.

 

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Free Guided Tours

Saturday, 4 October, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm AND 2.00pm – 3.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery Guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11.00am and 2.00pm.

Free Children's Art Activity

Sunday, 5 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Children must be accompanied by an adult during Art Cart, and parents are encouraged to support younger children in their art making.

 

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Free Guided Tours

Sunday, 5 October, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm AND 2.00pm – 3.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery Guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11.00am and 2.00pm.

Free Children's Art Activity

Saturday, 11 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Children must be accompanied by an adult during Art Cart, and parents are encouraged to support younger children in their art making.

 

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Free Guided Tour

Saturday, 11 October, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm (2.00pm Tour cancelled to accomodate 'In Conversation: Noel McKenna')
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery Guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Free Artist Talk

Saturday, 11 October, 2014

2.00pm - 3.00pm
In Conversation: Noel McKenna
Bookings Required


Free, bookings required
Call 02 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Join artist Noel McKenna in conversation with Newcastle Art Gallery Curator Sarah Johnson, discussing McKenna’s art practice and works in the Gallery collection. 

Free Children's Art Activity

Sunday, 12 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Children must be accompanied by an adult during Art Cart, and parents are encouraged to support younger children in their art making.

 

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Free Guided Tours

Sunday, 12 October, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm AND 2.00pm – 3.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery Guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11.00am and 2.00pm.

Music Performance - Free with exhibition entry

Sunday, 12 October, 2014

3.00pm - 4.00pm
Life is a Cabaret
Bookings Required


Featuring soprano Kathleen Moore, and Erin Sweetman on the Gallery's Stuart and Sons piano. Visit the Gallery for this special performance of European cabaret, held in the exhibition Elioth Gruner: the texture of light, and taking inspiration from Gruner's visit to Europe as a young man in 1923.

 

Free with exhibition entry.
(General: $8, Concession/Members: $5, Children under 12: Free)
A viewing area is also available from the First Floor Gallery,
however seating will not be available.

Call 02 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au

Gallery Society Event - Art Crawl

Sunday, 12 October, 2014

4.00pm - 7.00pm
Art Crawl - a tour of private art collections in the Hunter
Bookings Required


Gallery Society members open their homes to share their art collections.
Venues to be revealed upon payment.

$50 (Members only event)
Limited numbers
Bookings required, call 02 4929 5867

Access professional appraisals advice

Wednesday, 15 October, 2014

10.00am - 5.00pm
Appraisal Day with certified valuers
Bookings Required


$5 per 15 minute appointments

Bookings required, call 02 4974 5100

Please bring the piece you would like to have evaluated with you on the day.
Good photographs are also fine if a work is too big to transport.

 

Bring your artworks, curios and prized ornaments to the Gallery for this appraisal day held annually in October each year.

Book a 15 minute appointment to speak directly to a certified valuer to discover the true value of your artworks and objects. Appraisal days are exciting events not just for the owners, but also the valuers, as they never know what they are going to discover. It is important to remember that values are not just down to a monetary return, but just as much to historical and sentimental appeal. A family heirloom might not be worth much at auction, but can be priceless for future generations.

Access professional conservation advice

Wednesday, 15 October, 2014

10.00am - 5.00pm
Conserve and Preserve with Duncan Harty
Bookings Required


$5 per 15 minute appointments

Bookings required, call 02 4974 5100

Please bring the piece you would like to have evaluated with you on the day.
Good photographs are also fine if a work is too big to transport.

 

Book an appointment with professional conservator Duncan Harty to receive advice on how to restore damaged photographs, prints and paintings and learn the best way to display or store them for longevity.   

Free Children's Art Activity

Saturday, 18 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Children must be accompanied by an adult during Art Cart, and parents are encouraged to support younger children in their art making.

 

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Free Guided Tours

Saturday, 18 October, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm AND 2.00pm – 3.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery Guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11.00am and 2.00pm.

Free Children's Art Activity

Sunday, 19 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Children must be accompanied by an adult during Art Cart, and parents are encouraged to support younger children in their art making.

 

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Free Guided Tours

Sunday, 19 October, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm AND 2.00pm – 3.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery Guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11.00am and 2.00pm.

Gallery Society Event- Poetry Reading

Sunday, 19 October, 2014

5.00pm - 7.00pm
Remembering Dylan Thomas
Bookings Required


$10 per person, includes refreshments.
Call 02 4974 5123 


This year marks one hundred years since the birth of Welsh poet, playwright and author Dylan Thomas. Excerpts from his enchanting Under Milk Wood, A play for voices will be read by Gordon Weiss. 

 

Dylan Thomas wrote prolifically from a very young age, with his first poem being published in his school magazine. Under Milk Wood, A play for voices was first published in book form in 1954, and has never been out of print. The first broadcast of the whole work, with a distinguished Welsh cast, was given on 25 January 1954.

Gordon Weiss
is an author, businessman and former UN official who last read with Tilda Swinton, Simon Callow and Stephen Fry in The Moby Dick Big Read - www.mobydickbigread.com

Free Exhibition Talk

Wednesday, 22 October, 2014

3.00pm - 4.30pm
In Conversation: Brett Stone and Christopher Hodges
Bookings Required


Free, bookings required
Call 02 4974 5100 or email artgallery@ncc.nsw.gov.au

 

Speakers:

Sarah Johnson, Curator Newcastle Art Gallery

Brett Stone, Manager Olsen Irwin Gallery

Christopher Hodges, Director Utopia Art Sydney

 

Listen to curator of the exhibition Sarah Johnson, in conversation with Hanssen Pigott and Gazzard’s long standing Gallerists.

Free Children's Art Activity

Saturday, 25 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Children must be accompanied by an adult during Art Cart, and parents are encouraged to support younger children in their art making.

 

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Free Guided Tours

Saturday, 25 October, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm AND 2.00pm – 3.00pm
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery Guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

During the Elioth Gruner: the texture of light exhibition, Guided Tours will occur at both 11.00am and 2.00pm.

Free Children's Art Activity

Sunday, 26 October, 2014

10.30am - 12.30pm
Art Cart
Bookings Not Required


Art Cart engages children with exhibitions and artists on display through discussion and art making. Every weekend the program engages with different works of art, grounding the child’s experience of the Gallery with tactile, hands–on experiences. Children must be accompanied by an adult during Art Cart, and parents are encouraged to support younger children in their art making.

 

Sponsored by BMT Quantity Surveyors Newcastle, Mega Pacific Newcastle and S&S Creativity unlimited.

Free Guided Tour

Sunday, 26 October, 2014

11.00am – 12.00pm (2.00pm Tour cancelled to accomodate 'An Afternoon in the Sunlight')
Guided Tour
Bookings Not Required


Join our Gallery Guides for a free tour of current exhibitions.

Jazz Music and Hunter wine produce tasting

Sunday, 26 October, 2014

1.00pm - 4.00pm
An Afternoon in the Sunlight - presented in partnership with Pepper Tree Wines
Bookings Required


Event Program:  

When we think of Elioth Gruner we think of land and light. To mark the end of this exhibition come to the Gallery for an elegant afternoon sampling produce from our local land while mellowing with jazz music in the spring sunlight.

1.00pm: Guided tour of the exhibition Elioth Gruner: the texture of light (optional)

2.00pm: Wine & produce tasting, with music

3:30pm: Jazz continues until 4:30pm with a complimentary glass of your favourite wine

$30 per person, bookings required

call 02 4974 5100


Presented in partnership with Pepper Tree Wines

AFTER FIVE: Fashion from the Darnell Collection

14 September – 10 November 2013

AFTER FIVE Fashion from the Darnell Collection is a major exhibition of fashion presenting over thirty garments and accessories from around the world by iconic designers including Christian Dior, Mary Quant, Oscar de le Renta, Bruce Oldfield, Adolpho, Emilio Pucci, Emanuel Ungaro, Christopher Essex and Franco Moschino.

The exhibition is drawn from The Darnell Collection of International Vintage Couture. Now considered Australia’s largest private collection of fashion, the collection has an intriguing provenance. The core of the collection was put together by Doris Darnell, a Quaker from Pennsylvania, who from the 1930s gathered together items of clothing worn by her wealthy friends and acquaintances. The glamorous garments worn for special occasions were of particular interest.

In 2004 Doris bequeathed half her collection to an American university, and the other half to her goddaughter, Charlotte Smith. Since inheriting the collection, Charlotte has continued to develop and refine her holdings, which now numbers over 6000 items. New acquisitions by Charlotte have resulted in many of the works bearing an Australian provenance.

With gowns by some of the greatest names in fashion, as well as some talented but little-known designers, the exhibition illustrates stylistic moments in fashion, and explores how and why evening wear has changed for women over the years.

Commencing in the 1920s and spanning the decades up to the 1990s, the exhibition presents garments originally worn to cocktail soirees, balls, opening nights at the theatre, charity events, graduation parties and red carpet galas, and for dancing at nightclubs and discotheques.

First shown at Hazelhurst Regional Gallery & Arts Centre in early 2013, Newcastle Art Gallery is working with Charlotte Smith to expand the range of material on display and curate a new exhibition experience just for Hunter audiences.

General admission: $8
Members/concession: $5
Children under 12 and pre-booked education groups are free.

A  Hazelhurst Regional Gallery & Arts Centre travelling exhibition made possible through the assistance of Charlotte Smith of the Darnell Collection.