Good Bushland Neighbours

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When people think of bats they usually think of flying foxes. Unlike flying foxes microbats use echolocation to see. They are little creatures weighing between 2 and 170 grams depending on the species. They eat a whole range of insects including mosquitoes, beetles, moths and cockroaches. They can sometimes be seen fluttering around street lights.

Report on 'Go Batty' activities in March

In March Newcastle residents were invited to discover local bushland reserves at night as part of a Council's 'Go Batty' community events. Although it was a pretty wet month it didn't deter interested residents who came out in force to three nocturnal habitat hikes. Unfortunately our fourth hike had to be cancelled due to the wet weather. Spotlighting and bat call surveys and Monofilament Harp Trap demonstrations were undertaken at each site.Details of fauna recorded at each site, including observation type and conservation status are shown in Tables 1-3.

Other 'Go Batty' activities included the installation of microbat boxes at four bushland reserves within Newcastle with the assistance of local Landcarers and residents. This project was supported by the NSW Government through its Environmental Trust.

Table 1: Details of fauna recorded at George McGregor Reserve on 20/03/2017.

Species Name Common Name Conservation Status Observation Type
Chalinolobus gouldii Gould's Wattled Bat   Ultrasonic recording
Vespadelus sp. Unidentified Eptesicus   Ultrasonic recording
Miniopterus australis Little Bentwing-bat TSC Act 1995 - Vulnerable Ultrasonic recording
Likely Scoteanax rueppellii Greater Broad-nosed Bat TSC Act 1995 - Vulnerable Ultrasonic recording
Possible Mormopterus ridei Eastern Free-tailed Bat   Spotlighted
Trichosurus vulpecula Common Brushtail Possum   Spotlighted
Pseudocheirus peregrinus Common Ringtail Possum   Spotlighted
Pteropus poliocephalus Grey-headed flying fox TSC Act 1995 – Vulnerable
EPBC Act 1999 - Vulnerable
Spotlighted (Feeding on flowering Red Bloodwoods)
Podargus strigoides Tawny Frogmouth   Spotlighted

Table 2: Details of fauna recorded at Jesmond Park on 21/03/2017.​
Species Name Common Name Conservation Status Observation Type
Chalinolobus gouldii Gould's Wattled Bat   Ultrasonic recording
Vespadelus sp. Unidentified Eptesicus   Ultrasonic recording
Miniopterus australis Little Bentwing-bat TSC Act 1995 - Vulnerable Ultrasonic recording
Possible Scoteanax rueppellii Greater Broad-nosed Bat TSC Act 1995 - Vulnerable Ultrasonic recording
Possible Mormopterus ridei Eastern Free-tailed Bat   Spotlighted
Trichosurus vulpecula Common Brushtail Possum   Spotlighted
Pseudocheirus peregrinus Common Ringtail Possum   Spotlighted
Petaurus norfolcensis Squirrel Glider TSC Act 1995 - Vulnerable Spotlighted. Observed within nest boxes.
Pteropus poliocephalus Grey-headed flying fox TSC Act 1995 – Vulnerable
EPBC Act 1999 - Vulnerable
Spotlighted (Feeding on flowering Red Bloodwoods)
Podargus strigoides Tawny Frogmouth   Spotlighted

Table 3: Details of fauna recorded at Wallsend Brickwork Park on 29/03/2017.
Species Name Common Name Conservation Status Observation Type
Chalinolobus gouldii Gould's Wattled Bat   Ultrasonic recording
Vespadelus sp. Unidentified Eptesicus   Ultrasonic recording
Chalinolobus morio Chocolate Wattled Bat   Ultrasonic recording
Pteropus poliocephalus Grey-headed flying fox TSC Act 1995 – Vulnerable
EPBC Act 1999 - Vulnerable
Spotlighted
Podargus strigoides Tawny Frogmouth   Spotlighted
Egretta novaehollandiae White-faced Heron   Spotlighted
Limnodynastes peroni Striped Marsh Frog   Call heard in wetland
Crinia signifera Common Eastern Froglet   Call heard in wetland

Are you a Good Bushland Neighbour? If you live close to bushland there are a range of things you can do to help Newcastle's bushland thrive.
 
  • Keep your backyard in your backyard. Dumping lawn clippings or green waste in bushland will spread weeds and can create a fire hazard
  • Why not build a nestbox for our furry and feathery friends and install it in your backyard
  • Why not compost your green waste at home in a compost bin or worm farm or use your green bin
  • Leave the bush in the bush. Do not remove dead trees, logs or branches from reserves as these are often homes for our local wildlife
  • Remove any invasive weeds from your garden and replace them with local natives. They require less water and attract native birds and animals to your garden
  • Keep you cats and dogs out of the bush as their instinct is to hunt native wildlife
  • Stay on all designated tracks when using bushland areas and take all your rubbish away with you.